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Old time strings vs what we have today?

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  • #16
    Sets of strings were more $$ in the 60's and 70's than they are now.

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    • #17
      When I found my dad's old Silvertone, there was a set of Gretsch "medium" guage strings in the box. Look like 12s to me.

      EG
      We're not in Kansas anymore.

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      • #18
        Back in the old days, you couldn't get "light" strings, I think the lightest gauge for electric guitars was 12s. A lot of the '60s blues players (like Jimmy Page) would substitute a banjo string for the High E and lose the 6th string in the set. The first "light" gauge strings to become available in England were Fender 10-38 sets (10-13-15-26-32-38 mm). People had to use those for a long time. Rory Gallagher, Albert Collins, and Jimi were users of those gauges.

        I like the GHS Boomers LXL set, which are 10-38 gauge strings, I use them on my 25.5" scale guitars. I'm not too fond of Fender strings. I'm glad that GHS has a set like that available, so does Dean Markley.

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        • #19
          I like to think of them as a "weight-relieved" set of 10s

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          • #20
            Back in the 70's we'd break a string, go down the the music store and buy a single string to replace it. Can you even do that now?

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            • #21
              csm, you've been playing a long time.

              What brands of strings did you use in your early years?

              What was available on your side of the big pond?


              Back in the late '70s, my band was 'auditioned' for a Rotosound endorsement. This meant that they gave us a bunch of strings to use on a tour just in case we ever got successful eough to make it worth their while to use us in ads. As it happened, we didn't ... but the strings barely lasted two gigs* per set. I then switched to Ernie's, which I've been (happily) using ever since. I've occasionally tried Rotos since ... and they still die and/or break unacceptably quickly.

              In fairness to Rotosound, their bass strings are a great deal better ... my bass-playing ex-wife used them for almost fifteen years -- before switching to Maxima Golds, which cost more but retained tonal life a LOT longer.

              *As an opening act, we were doing 40-minute sets ... which meant that a new pack of Rotos were good for less than an hour and a half of playing.
              http://charlesshaarmurray.com/







              Originally Posted by Spike


              He's got his crust all stiff and upper with that nancy-boy accent. You Englishmen are all so ... bloody hell ... sodding, blimey, shagging, knickers, bollocks ... oh no, I'm ENGLISH!









              Originally Posted by Lucio


              everyone has different gear and stuff like this tends to be quite subjective.









              Originally Posted by Captain Jack Sparrow


              Gentlemen, I wash my hands of this weirdness.



              Honorary Granddaughter: FerdinandStrat

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              • #22
                Back in the 70's we'd break a string, go down the the music store and buy a single string to replace it. Can you even do that now?
                I haven't been to a brick and mortar music store in ages

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                • #23
                  re: Black Diamond... When I started playing, 1987ish, the old dudes used to rave about how good Black Diamonds were. Since I was 13 or so, throwing $10+ at a set of strings wasn't exactly a frequent occasion, so I made them last. I remember that I kept one set on there for so long that the wraps on the E string began to separate. I could fit a Fender medium pick between them when I finally changed strings. They sucked, but they worked, plus they were the only thing you could get in the little 1/2 horse town I grew up in. I took my daughter to buy strings for her new guitar on Saturday and she picked a pack of light blue Ernie Ball for $3.50.. Couldn't have done that when I was her age!
                  Signature...

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                  • #24
                    I haven't been to a brick and mortar music store in ages


                    Of course, truth be told, I haven't broken a string in a long time. They're a lot better made than they used to be.

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                    • #25
                      Of course, truth be told, I haven't broken a string in a long time. They're a lot better made than they used to be.
                      I stick with GHS and D'Addario.

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                      • #26
                        D'addario over here. XL120s for the last 20 years. I do like Elixirs for the acoustic though, but those super cheap pure bronze Martins sound amazing. Too bad they last about a week, if that.
                        Signature...

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                        • #27
                          I like my slinkys.
                          dharmaforone.bandcamp.comListen to my music and such.Strat - Jazzmaster - Bunch of fuzz and delay pedals - map.

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                          • #28
                            I started out by trying to play an old Harmony Arch-top strung with Black Diamonds and it was not a good experience.

                            By comparison, we live in Guitar Heaven. No kidding!
                            Mymindsok


                            For Sale/Trade: Brand New Butler Tube Driver! (http://acapella.harmony-central.com/...-SALE-OR-TRADE! )




                            You know, a long time ago, crazy meant somethin. Now-a-days.... Hell, everybodys crazy!

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                            • #29
                              Back when I first started playing, you bought strings in a music store and many of those were mom and pop stores.
                              You were luckey if they had more than one brand and more than heacey medium and light strings.
                              You had better selections if you went to a major city to buy. Labella were popular. they are still and excelent string.
                              Black Dimonds were the big acoustic strings. I dont even think they made electrics then. Fender strings were the big seller
                              because they came in the lightest gauges. Then GHS started making thin strings in the 70's. You could buy 7's which were
                              popular for awhile. Most rock guitarists were using 8's though. They just got the sound that was popular then. Anything heavier
                              sounding like your granpas jazz guitar. 9's and 10's just were perfected gauges yet.

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                              • #30
                                Lots of options these days.

                                Black Diamond strings were about the only ones available in the town where I lived. They were bad!



                                Yep, and you bought them at the hardware store.
                                HCGB Trooper #24

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