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  • #31
    I prefer the look of no grain filler on porous woods with True Oil personally.



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    • #32
      Ok, so heavy TO, wait over night, wet sand, wait over night, repeat.

      Those are nice Atrox, I just can't get into the porous look. I don't really care for the Gibson Faded Specials that much either.
      Squier Standard Telealvarez PD80-SC

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      • #33
        Ok, so heavy TO, wait over night, wet sand, wait over night, repeat.

        Those are nice Atrox, I just can't get into the porous look. I don't really care for the Gibson Faded Specials that much either.


        Fair enough. "To each his own" as they say. As for the Gibson faded series... well, they are some of the worst guitars I have had in my shop.
        My various guitar build • repair • maintenance threads

        My Custom Guitar page

        Some of my motion graphics ****************

        My metal band, Sulaco
        Download Sulaco, "Build and Burn" for free or pay in any format you want

        My instrumental Prog band, BML

        1981 Marshall 2203
        Marshall DSL50

        Comment


        • #34
          Maybe my memory is playing tricks on me, but I think you should be sure to really wash your rags/paper towels after oiling with them and crumpling them up in the trash. I seem to recall something about them catching on fire randomly otherwise.



          I could just be retarded, but it seemed worth mentioning if I'm not mistaken.

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          • #35
            Yeah, I played an SG with the worst fret ends on any guitar I have ever played. Those things almost cut me. Ironically the GFS neck I got for $40 has some of the best fret ends I have ever seen/felt.
            Squier Standard Telealvarez PD80-SC

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            • #36
              Maybe my memory is playing tricks on me, but I think you should be sure to really wash your rags/paper towels after oiling with them and crumpling them up in the trash. I seem to recall something about them catching on fire randomly otherwise.



              I could just be retarded, but it seemed worth mentioning if I'm not mistaken.





              Yep, I'm not crazy; **************** is spontaneously combustable. Should probably read all of it, but section 7 is the important bit about your rags lighting on fire randomly.


              Tru-oil Hazard .pdf

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              • #37
                This trip back in time is brought to you by the letter G and the new hunk of ash I just cut for a tele project. I've never worked with ash before and would like to discuss the finishing of the body. I'm thinking tru-oil, and I'm thinking filling the grain. Seems like much less of a pain not to fill it and polish it, but I think I would be happier with a high polish. Discuss.
                1 Jay Turser JTLT standard
                1 Vox AD30VT
                1 Alvarez Koa Acoustic
                No job, 3 kids, a wife, and a mountain of debt.

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                • #38
                  Uhhh... I don't think they are mutually exclusive. I think if your desire was to start off with a non-sanded and non-filled ash body and end up with a smooth feeling, dead flat glossy surface where you could still see the unfilled grain on the ash, but have it feel perfectly smooth and high gloss, I think you can do that with Tru Oil. I've only done one mahogany body and several maple necks with Tru Oil, but based on the mahogany project, I think you could keep building up the Tru Oil until it has filled in the grain to the point where it is polish-able.




                  If I'm understanding your goal correctly.
                  Originally Posted by Doctor Morbius:

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                  • #39
                    Yes, and that is covered in this thread. I just wondered if there was other advice regarding finishing out ash.
                    1 Jay Turser JTLT standard
                    1 Vox AD30VT
                    1 Alvarez Koa Acoustic
                    No job, 3 kids, a wife, and a mountain of debt.

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                    • #40
                      ... I'm thinking tru-oil, and I'm thinking filling the grain. Seems like much less of a pain not to fill it and polish it, but I think I would be happier with a high polish. ...

                      Doing a flat mirror finish with Tru Oil is a major pain, or better put, a time consuming exercise in patience. While you say that you would be happier with a high polish, ultimately its up to you to decide if your willing to invest the time.

                      If I was committed from the start to go mirror flat, I'd personally do a grain fill with some Zpoxy Finishing Resin. On ash its going to take at least 2 sessions. The first will get 99% and the second to get the spots you missed.
                      I use a squeegee to apply it like in this vid. Also more info at this LMI link http://www.lmii.com/CartTwo/thirdproducts.asp?CategoryName=Filler&NameProdHead er=Z-poxy

                      .


                      .
                      For the undecided, or on the fence approach, you could just start applying TO without any grain fill. After about 5 - 6 coats in you will know if its headed in a direction you like. If not, you can still fall back to the sand with Tru Oil / slurry technique to fill the grain and continue on from there.
                      This was filled with the sand / slurry method.

                      .
                      My Name is Tom Pettingill ... I build Hand Crafted Custom Lap Steel Guitars
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                      • #41
                        Doing a flat mirror finish with Tru Oil is a major pain, or better put, a time consuming exercise in patience. While you say that you would be happier with a high polish, ultimately its up to you to decide if your willing to invest the time.

                        If I was committed from the start to go mirror flat, I'd personally do a grain fill with some Zpoxy Finishing Resin. On ash its going to take at least 2 sessions. The first will get 99% and the second to get the spots you missed.

                        This was filled with the sand / slurry method.

                        .


                        Do you use anything to color the grain?
                        1 Jay Turser JTLT standard
                        1 Vox AD30VT
                        1 Alvarez Koa Acoustic
                        No job, 3 kids, a wife, and a mountain of debt.

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                        • #42
                          I can speak from the one time I did it and it turned out just like I hoped for. I like the feel of feeling the grain but knowing it's protected and durable. I sanded carefully and with graded sand paper using latex gloves to make sure I don't "contaminate" the wood with skin oil. I did not fill the grain. I applied ten or twelve coats of tru oil with light "steel wooling" in between coats.







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                          • #43
                            The easiest grain fill is brush-on polyurethane (oil based, not the newer water based materials). I pour some in a cup and leave it out a few hours to thicken. Brush it on heavy and then wipe across the grain. Follow with a green scotchbrite after dry and then start your Tru-Oil. Nice thing about using the Poly is that it does not change the character of the wood because it is clear. All grain fillers, unless perfectly color matched to the finished wood's color, leave the wood pores looking like they are filled with paste.
                            "I've got a briefcase of thin air. I can play some tricks on you, pretend that I don't care." The Contrast

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                            • #44
                              I can speak from the one time I did it and it turned out just like I hoped for. I like the feel of feeling the grain but knowing it's protected and durable. I sanded carefully and with graded sand paper using latex gloves to make sure I don't "contaminate" the wood with skin oil. I did not fill the grain. I applied ten or twelve coats of tru oil with light "steel wooling" in between coats.




                              That looks really good. Can you still feel the grain.
                              1 Jay Turser JTLT standard
                              1 Vox AD30VT
                              1 Alvarez Koa Acoustic
                              No job, 3 kids, a wife, and a mountain of debt.

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                              • #45
                                The easiest grain fill is brush-on polyurethane (oil based, not the newer water based materials). I pour some in a cup and leave it out a few hours to thicken. Brush it on heavy and then wipe across the grain. Follow with a green scotchbrite after dry and then start your Tru-Oil. Nice thing about using the Poly is that it does not change the character of the wood because it is clear. All grain fillers, unless perfectly color matched to the finished wood's color, leave the wood pores looking like they are filled with paste.


                                This sounds interesting and makes a lot of sense. Have you actually done this? Has anyone else done this? And, if you're covering it in poly already, then is the tru oil even necessary? How does that work?
                                1 Jay Turser JTLT standard
                                1 Vox AD30VT
                                1 Alvarez Koa Acoustic
                                No job, 3 kids, a wife, and a mountain of debt.

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