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Did dick (yes, with a small "d") Cavett show Hendrix proper respect?

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  • Did dick (yes, with a small "d") Cavett show Hendrix proper respect?



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4Gc0B3vNVo
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  • #2
    American media in the 60s treated rock musicians with contempt - although Mike Douglass and Ed Sullivan were notable exceptions. Dick Cavett was always pretentious - not just to Jimi Hendrix, but to everyone.
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    • #3
      Didn't seem like a dick to me. OTOH Hendrix seemed like he was truly wrapped up in that 60s hippy trippy mumbo jumbo.
      I one day hope to be the man my dog thinks I am.WORDS OF WISDOM FROM VARIOUS MEMBERS"most often the guitar will rise or fall to the level of the player""people overthink ****************""Sometimes you gotta know when to shut the **************** up and have a little class. Not you, you're special.""If it sounds good to you then it sounds good"The bull**************** and myths in the guitar world are stacked very high.

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      • #4
        That was Cavett's shtick. The band backed Jimi nicely.
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        • #5
          meh....I don't know....I don't think it was that bad. Cavett's "comedy" just clashed with Jimi's flakiness. Jimi was probably so high he didn't know what he was being asked.



          song was sweet though.

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          • #6
            It reminds me very much of our Jonathan Ross, to be honest I think Cavett comes over pretty well, and ahead of it's time






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            • #7
              Yeah, he was pretty dry and could definitely come off as being a pretentious prick but more in the 'elitist university professor' way rather than just a dismissive sort of way.



              My guess is if you could have asked Jimi what he thought of Cavett three days after that show, he'd probably have responded, 'Seems nice enough on the tube but I've never met him so I don't really know.'



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              • #8
                Seriously? I think Dick was pretty cool. He is much less "snarky" than people like Letterman. In fact Dick kind of reminds me of being a cross between Bob Newhart and David Letterman.
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                • #9
                  Dick Cavett was very well-liked by musicians who considered Cavett cool--which is why so many musicians appeared on his show, even though they seemed to, otherwise, eschew appearing on TV.

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                  • #10
                    I thought both were pretty cool.
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                    • #11
                      I remember the Dick Cavett show from being a kid. Miss that type of 'dry' wit.



                      Looks like Jimi's playin' thru an Ampeg flip top Portaflex bass amp.



                      Dick's orchestra playing Purple Haze at Jimi's into at 75 is hysterical!

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                      • #12
                        I did not sense any disrespect at all. That was Cavett's sense of humor. At that time, he was the "hip" talk show host. If I remember correctly, Jimi only appeared on The Dick Cavett Show. I think Jimi appeared again after Woodstock.
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                        • #13






                          Quote Originally Posted by Cobalt Blue
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                          Dick Cavett was very well-liked by musicians who considered Cavett cool--which is why so many musicians appeared on his show, even though they seemed to, otherwise, eschew appearing on TV.




                          Another cool appearance is a very young Frank Zappa on the Steve Allen show. While Allen definitely had fun with the idea of Zappa playing a solo on the bicycle, it was clearly with the understanding that Zappa was having fun with it himself, and there was never an air of condescension toward his guest. In fact, right after Zappa's performance, Allen mentioned that it reminded him of the work of Alwin Nikolais, describing him as a very gifted composer.
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                          • #14
                            Jimi's appearance on Dick Cavett is one of my earliest memories.



                            Dick Cavett comes across as high falutin', that's just who he is. He has a dry wit, but he comes across as pretentious at times.



                            Bob Costas is kind of like a milder version of Dick Cavett, today.



                            But Cavett could get out the rhetorical dukes, too. He had a notable on-air battle with Norman Mailer once, where he brought Mailer down a couple of pegs.
                            Originally Posted by csm


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                            • #15






                              Quote Originally Posted by GREC
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                              Dick's orchestra playing Purple Haze at Jimi's into at 75 is hysterical!




                              i think that would be foxy lady, band sounded great, drummer was brill and stuck right with jimi when they played , i think jimi may have pissed dick off by saying the art of words mean nothing.
                              Consternoon Aftable

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