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  • #76






    Quote Originally Posted by Steadfastly
    View Post

    I am soooo with you on this. As Mr. Keller says about hand/thumb position, I prefer having my thumb on the back of the guitar regardless of what I'm playing. I also have been thinking about a telecaster for my next guitar. Have you thought about buying a telecaster, even a good used one and ordering a wide neck from someone like Warmoth? It would be a lot less expensive than having a luthier build you one.




    I'm playing an American Standard Telecaster now. It's a 2009 and I had to play a lot of them, but I found one with a neck carve that is fairly comfortable. The variance among the necks is amazing, even on a production guitar, I guess since the neck still has some final hand shaping.



    But yes, I have considered buying a Tele wide neck from Warmoth. I've never done this before, but in reading up on the subject, most people found that these replacement necks need a bit of final fret work done, they are rarely good to go. So I'm back to the luthier search, and the two I've used in the area were less than advertized.



    Plus, if I go replacement neck, I really want to try stainless steel frets, so that would make it even harder to get a luthier, as it seems that not all of them will do SS fret work.

    Comment


    • #77






      Quote Originally Posted by Steadfastly
      View Post

      I am soooo with you on this. As Mr. Keller says about hand/thumb position, I prefer having my thumb on the back of the guitar regardless of what I'm playing. I also have been thinking about a telecaster for my next guitar. Have you thought about buying a telecaster, even a good used one and ordering a wide neck from someone like Warmoth? It would be a lot less expensive than having a luthier build you one.




      I'm playing an American Standard Telecaster now. It's a 2009 and I had to play a lot of them, but I found one with a neck carve that is fairly comfortable. The variance among the necks is amazing, even on a production guitar, I guess since the neck still has some final hand shaping.



      But yes, I have considered buying a Tele wide neck from Warmoth. I've never done this before, but in reading up on the subject, most people found that these replacement necks need a bit of final fret work done, they are rarely good to go. So I'm back to the luthier search, and the two I've used in the area were less than advertized.



      Plus, if I go replacement neck, I really want to try stainless steel frets, so that would make it even harder to get a luthier, as it seems that not all of them will do SS fret work.

      Comment


      • #78
        Oh, how I love women that play a musical instrument...



        I like big fat necks because small necks make my hands cramp. I can play small necks, they just hurt.
        MIA Fender Strat / Gibson Les Paul Studio / Custom Telecaster / Washburn WI66 / Custom Stratocaster / Martin D15S / Guild D55 / Simon & Patrick Cedar

        Comment


        • #79
          Oh, how I love women that play a musical instrument...



          I like big fat necks because small necks make my hands cramp. I can play small necks, they just hurt.
          MIA Fender Strat / Gibson Les Paul Studio / Custom Telecaster / Washburn WI66 / Custom Stratocaster / Martin D15S / Guild D55 / Simon & Patrick Cedar

          Comment


          • #80
            I have small hands, but I prefer 1-11/16 or 1-3/4. I don't like 1-5/8. It does feel really cramped. I also like a flatter fretboard radius.

            Comment


            • #81
              I have small hands, but I prefer 1-11/16 or 1-3/4. I don't like 1-5/8. It does feel really cramped. I also like a flatter fretboard radius.

              Comment


              • #82






                Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Friendly
                View Post

                I'm playing an American Standard Telecaster now. It's a 2009 and I had to play a lot of them, but I found one with a neck carve that is fairly comfortable. The variance among the necks is amazing, even on a production guitar, I guess since the neck still has some final hand shaping.



                But yes, I have considered buying a Tele wide neck from Warmoth. I've never done this before, but in reading up on the subject, most people found that these replacement necks need a bit of final fret work done, they are rarely good to go. So I'm back to the luthier search, and the two I've used in the area were less than advertized.



                Plus, if I go replacement neck, I really want to try stainless steel frets, so that would make it even harder to get a luthier, as it seems that not all of them will do SS fret work.




                IMHO, SS frets are the only way to go if it's at all possible.
                Foul language is the sign of a weak mind trying to express itself forcibly. * Thankfully, my computer program masks all the foul language and changes it to @&%)7#

                Comment


                • #83






                  Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Friendly
                  View Post

                  I'm playing an American Standard Telecaster now. It's a 2009 and I had to play a lot of them, but I found one with a neck carve that is fairly comfortable. The variance among the necks is amazing, even on a production guitar, I guess since the neck still has some final hand shaping.



                  But yes, I have considered buying a Tele wide neck from Warmoth. I've never done this before, but in reading up on the subject, most people found that these replacement necks need a bit of final fret work done, they are rarely good to go. So I'm back to the luthier search, and the two I've used in the area were less than advertized.



                  Plus, if I go replacement neck, I really want to try stainless steel frets, so that would make it even harder to get a luthier, as it seems that not all of them will do SS fret work.




                  IMHO, SS frets are the only way to go if it's at all possible.
                  Foul language is the sign of a weak mind trying to express itself forcibly. * Thankfully, my computer program masks all the foul language and changes it to @&%)7#

                  Comment


                  • #84
                    I picked up a wide-neck from RT Customs this summer. Lovely guitar, but if I had got to do it again I would go with typical Les Paul width 1.695".



                    Barred chords or fingering the 5th and 6th strings at the 10th fret and above is less than comfortable.
                    "No one ever goes to heaven deservingly
                    and no one ever goes to hell unwillingly."
                    -CS Lewis

                    Comment


                    • #85
                      I picked up a wide-neck from RT Customs this summer. Lovely guitar, but if I had got to do it again I would go with typical Les Paul width 1.695".



                      Barred chords or fingering the 5th and 6th strings at the 10th fret and above is less than comfortable.
                      "No one ever goes to heaven deservingly
                      and no one ever goes to hell unwillingly."
                      -CS Lewis

                      Comment


                      • #86
                        I like 1 5/8" or slightly bigger (1.650") myself, easier for me to wrap around my thumb around and fret with. My hands aren't that big, and 1 5/8" is comfortable. I don't like necks thinner than that - I've played a few and it's too cramped. My LP is 1 11/16" and I do really like that guitar's neck for many things, but it does make some things more difficult and uncomfortable. The thickness (and profile) of the neck plays a big part in comfort, though, as well as fretboard radious and fret type. Super thin necks don't jell with me, and neither do baseball bats. All these dimensions work together - I haven't found any hard and fast rule, it's more a general tendency of what I like. On any particular guitar, who knows...








                        What do you think the reason is for this?



                        Tradition is probably a big reason. I'd also guess than on mass produced guitars they want to stick with necks that are easier to play for most people. I'm not sure an internet poll with less than 150 responses is really a valid judge of the guitar-buying public.
                        Multiple award winning blues/rock/country at http://www.zeyerband.com or http://www.reverbnation.com/zeyer.Check my solo (instrumental rock) projects at: http://www.reverbnation.com/vincedickinson"Music is like the English language - it's just full of rules that need to be broken or you aren't hip.""It doesn't take talent to upgrade your playing. It takes patience" - Kenny Werner

                        Comment


                        • #87
                          I like 1 5/8" or slightly bigger (1.650") myself, easier for me to wrap around my thumb around and fret with. My hands aren't that big, and 1 5/8" is comfortable. I don't like necks thinner than that - I've played a few and it's too cramped. My LP is 1 11/16" and I do really like that guitar's neck for many things, but it does make some things more difficult and uncomfortable. The thickness (and profile) of the neck plays a big part in comfort, though, as well as fretboard radious and fret type. Super thin necks don't jell with me, and neither do baseball bats. All these dimensions work together - I haven't found any hard and fast rule, it's more a general tendency of what I like. On any particular guitar, who knows...








                          What do you think the reason is for this?



                          Tradition is probably a big reason. I'd also guess than on mass produced guitars they want to stick with necks that are easier to play for most people. I'm not sure an internet poll with less than 150 responses is really a valid judge of the guitar-buying public.
                          Multiple award winning blues/rock/country at http://www.zeyerband.com or http://www.reverbnation.com/zeyer.Check my solo (instrumental rock) projects at: http://www.reverbnation.com/vincedickinson"Music is like the English language - it's just full of rules that need to be broken or you aren't hip.""It doesn't take talent to upgrade your playing. It takes patience" - Kenny Werner

                          Comment


                          • #88
                            A lot of modern guitars are based on old designs. Fender designed his Tele and Strat in the 50's for country players. They played a lot of cowboy chords. As did the early rock-n-rollers. Some people think narrow nut-widths make chording easier - I don't personally.



                            AFAIK the Les Paul was based on neck shapes off Gibson's acoustic guitars at the time. Les Paul must have liked the way the neck played because he allowed his name to be attached.



                            As much as guitarists claim to be individualists, they tend to be a fairly conservative lot. When it comes to gear, anything that deviates from the Fender/Gibson "norm" is generally viewed with suspicion in my experience.



                            I lean towards iconoclasm, personally.
                            --------------------------------
                            www.VerneAndru.com

                            Comment


                            • #89
                              A lot of modern guitars are based on old designs. Fender designed his Tele and Strat in the 50's for country players. They played a lot of cowboy chords. As did the early rock-n-rollers. Some people think narrow nut-widths make chording easier - I don't personally.



                              AFAIK the Les Paul was based on neck shapes off Gibson's acoustic guitars at the time. Les Paul must have liked the way the neck played because he allowed his name to be attached.



                              As much as guitarists claim to be individualists, they tend to be a fairly conservative lot. When it comes to gear, anything that deviates from the Fender/Gibson "norm" is generally viewed with suspicion in my experience.



                              I lean towards iconoclasm, personally.
                              --------------------------------
                              www.VerneAndru.com

                              Comment


                              • #90






                                Quote Originally Posted by 1001gear
                                View Post

                                Necks should extend at least a half inch beyond the outside strings. For bending of course.




                                Uhm no.



                                You bend your top string up, not down... and your bottom string down, not up.
                                Information is not knowledge
                                Knowledge is not wisdom
                                Wisdom is not truth
                                Truth is not beauty
                                Beauty is not love
                                Love is not music.
                                Music Is The Best.

                                - Frank Zappa

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