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Tom Anderson vs. Suhr: Let's start the year with a debate!

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  • #61






    Quote Originally Posted by Guitar Heel
    View Post

    I agree that no human has ever been able to explain this in any coherent way. I guess that's why I think it's absurd.




    I think it comes down to being inspired by the feeling of the instrument in your hands. So, like most other things guitar-related, it comes down to personal preference.









    Quote Originally Posted by Steadfastly
    View Post

    What makes them better than others? Pickups are very easy to replicate so you could take it apart and create the same thing, could you not?




    Pickups are not easy to replicate. Ask anyone who has ever made a set. Ask Jason Lollar what he thinks...ask Bryan Gunsher if he thinks his product could be 'easily replicated' or Jim Wagner. Maybe Lindy Fralin. Ask them all and report back with what you find.



    ...and finally, IF pickups were easily replicated, I'd have no brand name pickups at all because they would have been replicated by the companies that sell them cheap and I would have bought them all from there.
    President and CEO of The Foundation Of Right
    Also President and CEO of The Foundation Of Wrong






    Originally Posted by StankNasty


    the dream isn't in your parents' basement

    Comment


    • #62
      Had both and loved the Suhrs far more.

      The best however, imho, is Vigier. They do things to their guitars that no one else does, and every one gets the same treatment.



      Never played an anderson or Suhr that has a better feeling, more stable, and straight neck, and the Vigiers don't need to use baked maple to keep their necks absolutely stable in all climatic conditions. Also, among a lot of other things they do, Vigier is the only one that uses totally air-dried woods that they have had for years prior to building, and it's all grown in their home country.



      Also, they have their own bridges, not Japanese Gotoh bridges like everyone else uses. They are the best I've ever used. They pivot on ball bearings, not a knife edge that can dull, or six screws in the body at the bridge fulcrum point as older Fenders have.



      In Europe, they are very well respected. No american bolt-on guitar can touch them.
      Two of the nicest gentlemen, and most talented people: Mssr's Diezel and Krampe.
      Je préfèrerais mourir sans un sou dans une rue en Europe que de vivre en Amérique sous l'administration actuelle. Alizée est la meilleure. Vous, les princesses pop américaines, n'avez aucun talent, aucune classe, et vous sonnez comme de la merde. Sarkozy et le reste de l'Europe se moquent de notre président dans son dos.

      Comment


      • #63






        Quote Originally Posted by mistersully
        View Post

        can you give examples?.... i'm interested in your opinion as to which are the top japanese strats in particular... i've seen you mention momose before yeah?




        Sure....Yeah momose are fantastic guitars...If you want strat style guitars then I'd personally take any Navigator, Momose, Freedom guitar works, Scoop, or Van Zandt...just too name a few. Les Paul style Momose, and Navigator are the mains ones I'd look at but there are others. Other companies do more hybrid models like Crews guitars or a company called Combat.

        Comment


        • #64






          Quote Originally Posted by Chad
          View Post

          I've heard the "no soul", "no mojo", "no vibe" comments about these two brands along with other boutique brands on other forums as well. I wonder if it comes down to the "Jack White" theory? He likes a guitar that isn't perfect and requires him to work at playing it.



          Most of these boutique brands are as close to perfect as humanly possible.....excellent wood selection, quality components, excellent finish work, often have contour cuts and so forth to make them more ergonomic, flawless setups including fret leveling/crowning, etc. Perhaps that perfection takes the "vibe" or whatever out of the instruments for a lot of people?




          I appreciate jack white's music and love the Raconteurs in particular (and the stripes.)(dead weather... ) but this idea irks me. i understand enjoying taking a guitar that needs work to play it or has that "resistance" factor, SRV comes to mind, but the thought of not liking an instrument because it's a good instrument is weird.

          Comment


          • #65
            I'm not religious, but I believe in mojo.
            New stuff every day on Gain!

            Comment


            • #66






              Quote Originally Posted by mosiddiqi
              View Post

              They're both great guitars, I prefer the Suhr..just a feel thing..here's a quick vid with my S4 I did this morning..just warming up wankage






              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sAqRFWcKS68




              Wankage or not, I enjoyed that! Thanks!
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              Comment


              • #67






                Quote Originally Posted by frankie pajamas
                View Post

                Wankage or not, I enjoyed that! Thanks!






                I bet he could make my $250 MIM Strat sound exactly the same. Just sayin..
                Signature...

                Comment


                • #68






                  Quote Originally Posted by C-4
                  View Post

                  Had both and loved the Suhrs far more.

                  The best however, imho, is Vigier. They do things to their guitars that no one else does, and every one gets the same treatment.



                  Never played an anderson or Suhr that has a better feeling, more stable, and straight neck, and the Vigiers don't need to use baked maple to keep their necks absolutely stable in all climatic conditions. Also, among a lot of other things they do, Vigier is the only one that uses totally air-dried woods that they have had for years prior to building, and it's all grown in their home country.



                  Also, they have their own bridges, not Japanese Gotoh bridges like everyone else uses. They are the best I've ever used. They pivot on ball bearings, not a knife edge that can dull, or six screws in the body at the bridge fulcrum point as older Fenders have.



                  In Europe, they are very well respected. No american bolt-on guitar can touch them.




                  Took a look; do they all have zero frets?
                  Originally Posted by Hopeless


                  I wouldn't recommend them for metal, but then I also wouldn't recommend playing metal.









                  Originally Posted by Django Sentenza


                  When you've founded an entire branch of science dedicated to quantifying taste, get back to me.

                  Comment


                  • #69






                    Quote Originally Posted by Alecto
                    View Post

                    Hate to bring logic into a thread, but at that price point it's less about straight-up quality and more about whose vision of the instrument you think is better. I've played instruments from both makers and I love them both. Sad, ain't it?




                    That's it right there - at that level, it becomes more about your personal fit with the design than the execution of the design itself. Anderson, Suhr, and others do what they're trying to do about as perfectly as it can be done. It's just a question of whether you're on board with what they're trying to do.



                    I would argue there is a bit of a "mojo" aspect to a guitar. Once upon a time I had a high-end Ibanez RG with some hot DiMarzios in it. To me, it had no "vibe" because it produced a tone that was neutral to the point of being sterile/clinical sounding. It didn't have a particularly defining sonic signature in the way that many classics like a Strat, Tele, 335, etc have. Of course, IMO the neutral sound was the point of the guitar - for a high gain player, it was a neutral, powerful platform that played great and would let a high gain amp like a Boogie, etc take over the tone. For a clean/mid-gain player, it would sound very flat. If you're that kind of player, you could interpret a lot of modern/shreddy guitars that way. Although while I haven't played one, I'm guessing a Suhr T with traditional woods, pickups, and a 3-barrel bridge would have plenty of Tele "soul".
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                    • #70
                      This is not a knock on Suhr at all so I don't want people to get that impression but from everything I've heard on the internet I haven't been impressed with them. They could be the greatest guitars in the universe since I haven't played one in person but I haven't heard anything that impresses me yet. But honestly I don't know why, on paper a Suhr guitar would be my ultimate guitar, in fact I was going to purchase one for the hell of it before I bought a deluxe strat a while ago but then I was watching any video I could find on youtube of Suhr guitars and there was not one video where I was like "that is the tone I'm looking for!".



                      What it may come down to are their pickups, I don't know if their single coils are all noiseless and that's why they lose that strat warmth or what the deal is. But like anything it's a matter of taste and I support a small business owner trying to stick it to the big guys.

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        headstock decides all...I now suhrs are horrible so Anderson by default.
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                        • #72






                          Quote Originally Posted by Hardvalve
                          View Post

                          Suhr for me, but I own one. Picked it over a lot of good guitars at Make N Music in Chicago, including Anderson.




                          LOL

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Here's some clips using my $2100 '99 Tom Anderson Hollow Drop Top Classic:



                            http://www.soundclick.com/bands/defa...songID=5803803

                            http://www.soundclick.com/bands/defa...songID=5736046

                            http://www.soundclick.com/bands/defa...songID=7176655

                            http://www.soundclick.com/bands/defa...songID=6382397



                            Here's some clips using my $250 PRS SE :



                            http://www.soundclick.com/bands/defa...songID=6526404

                            http://www.soundclick.com/bands/defa...songID=6449646

                            http://www.soundclick.com/bands/defa...songID=6411222

                            http://www.soundclick.com/bands/defa...songID=6346712



                            You decide if the price of the guitar makes a big enough difference in tone.I will say that I really like the overall feel of the Anderson over the PRS SE. I haven't spent big dollars on any guitar since buying the Anderson. Only pawnshop guitars for me. Buy them cheap and fix them up. Tone is in the hands and the amp.Just my .02
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                            http://www.soundclick.com/bands/defa...&content=music

                            Comment


                            • #74






                              Quote Originally Posted by smorgdonkey
                              View Post

                              I think it comes down to being inspired by the feeling of the instrument in your hands. So, like most other things guitar-related, it comes down to personal preference.





                              Pickups are not easy to replicate. Ask anyone who has ever made a set. Ask Jason Lollar what he thinks...ask Bryan Gunsher if he thinks his product could be 'easily replicated' or Jim Wagner. Maybe Lindy Fralin. Ask them all and report back with what you find.



                              ...and finally, IF pickups were easily replicated, I'd have no brand name pickups at all because they would have been replicated by the companies that sell them cheap and I would have bought them all from there.




                              Smorgey: Watch some of the videos on how they are made. It's not a difficult thing if you have mechanical ability. You simply take them apart and copy them. Manufacturers do it with a lot more sophisticated products than pickups. Regards, Steadfastly
                              Foul language is the sign of a weak mind trying to express itself forcibly. * Thankfully, my computer program masks all the foul language and changes it to @&%)7#

                              Comment


                              • #75






                                Quote Originally Posted by skipstar59
                                View Post

                                Here's some clips using my $2100 '99 Tom Anderson Hollow Drop Top Classic:



                                http://www.soundclick.com/bands/defa...songID=5803803

                                http://www.soundclick.com/bands/defa...songID=5736046

                                http://www.soundclick.com/bands/defa...songID=7176655

                                http://www.soundclick.com/bands/defa...songID=6382397



                                Here's some clips using my $250 PRS SE :



                                http://www.soundclick.com/bands/defa...songID=6526404

                                http://www.soundclick.com/bands/defa...songID=6449646

                                http://www.soundclick.com/bands/defa...songID=6411222

                                http://www.soundclick.com/bands/defa...songID=6346712



                                You decide if the price of the guitar makes a big enough difference in tone.I will say that I really like the overall feel of the Anderson over the PRS SE. I haven't spent big dollars on any guitar since buying the Anderson. Only pawnshop guitars for me. Buy them cheap and fix them up. Tone is in the hands and the amp.Just my .02




                                Skip, that wasn't a fair test and you used different amps for the two guitars. I liked the $250.00 PRS on three and one was tied with the Anderson but to be fair, you need to have the same song, same amp, same settings, etc. to be able to compare. I agree that most of the tone is in the amp, though. And, BTW, nice playing!
                                Foul language is the sign of a weak mind trying to express itself forcibly. * Thankfully, my computer program masks all the foul language and changes it to @&%)7#

                                Comment



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