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les paul G-string goes sharp on lower frets.

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  • les paul G-string goes sharp on lower frets.

    Hey guys i got this annoying problem with my guitar. When i play A, F, D or E on the lower basic position, the chord sounds like crap. C and G sound fine because i'm pressing on the g-string. I filed the nut down a little and does not make a difference. On the upper frets, all chords sound good. i notice on the 2nd fret on the g-string, i can almost go up a full step by just pressing down hard on the string. What can be the problem? Replace the nut?

  • #2
    Just read my post above, TYPO, should read***** "C and G sound fine because i'm NOT pressing on the g-string." *******

    Comment


    • #3
      Just read my post above, TYPO, should read***** "C and G sound fine because i'm NOT pressing on the g-string." *******

      Comment


      • #4
        Does it have tall frets? Perhaps you are just pressing too hard when playing lower position chords. Tall frets require some technique adaptation.

        Comment


        • #5
          Does it have tall frets? Perhaps you are just pressing too hard when playing lower position chords. Tall frets require some technique adaptation.

          Comment


          • #6






            Quote Originally Posted by Chad
            View Post

            Does it have tall frets? Perhaps you are just pressing too hard when playing lower position chords. Tall frets require some technique adaptation.




            I play low, wide frets and I still fall back on old habits and press too hard making something go sharp. And a sharp G string sounds painful!

            SRS if it's only doing it on yer G string it could be a nut slot not deep enough. You always want yer nuts real deep
            There can never be a perfect plan. What's perfect for one human bean ain't perfect for the next one. Cuz he's a lentil.

            Comment


            • #7






              Quote Originally Posted by Chad
              View Post

              Does it have tall frets? Perhaps you are just pressing too hard when playing lower position chords. Tall frets require some technique adaptation.




              I play low, wide frets and I still fall back on old habits and press too hard making something go sharp. And a sharp G string sounds painful!

              SRS if it's only doing it on yer G string it could be a nut slot not deep enough. You always want yer nuts real deep
              There can never be a perfect plan. What's perfect for one human bean ain't perfect for the next one. Cuz he's a lentil.

              Comment


              • #8
                sounds like a nut issue. the angle of the string gets worse the closer you get to the nut... so the you're pulling on the string to fret it.



                Try this...



                1. look at the strings above the first fret without fretting anything....



                2. then fret the strings on the first fret and look at the second fret... that distance should be identical to #1. If #1 is a lot higher than #2, then you're nut is the issue.



                3. if you dont have the tools or experience filing a nut, take it to a tech. Its a $20 job.
                Gibson Les Paul Jr. / Rockinbetter 330, Rickenbacker 360
                Fender '59 Bassman RI / Sovtek mig100h / VHT lead 40
                Russian Big Muff / DIY FY-2 "companion fuzz"







                Originally Posted by donnie_combat


                G&L's are the most un creative stupid pieces of crap on the planet. if you want something decent and real go for fender~

                Comment


                • #9
                  sounds like a nut issue. the angle of the string gets worse the closer you get to the nut... so the you're pulling on the string to fret it.



                  Try this...



                  1. look at the strings above the first fret without fretting anything....



                  2. then fret the strings on the first fret and look at the second fret... that distance should be identical to #1. If #1 is a lot higher than #2, then you're nut is the issue.



                  3. if you dont have the tools or experience filing a nut, take it to a tech. Its a $20 job.
                  Gibson Les Paul Jr. / Rockinbetter 330, Rickenbacker 360
                  Fender '59 Bassman RI / Sovtek mig100h / VHT lead 40
                  Russian Big Muff / DIY FY-2 "companion fuzz"







                  Originally Posted by donnie_combat


                  G&L's are the most un creative stupid pieces of crap on the planet. if you want something decent and real go for fender~

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Pardon my asking : is it properly intonated at the bridge ?
                    "The blues is the recognition of a tragedy, and the optimism to deal with it" (Fruteland Jackson)

                    "You may think you're playing your instrument, but what you're really playing is the audience" (anonymous)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Pardon my asking : is it properly intonated at the bridge ?
                      "The blues is the recognition of a tragedy, and the optimism to deal with it" (Fruteland Jackson)

                      "You may think you're playing your instrument, but what you're really playing is the audience" (anonymous)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Intonation on the bridge is good.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Intonation on the bridge is good.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Maybe you have bigger frets and are used to smaller ones. Bigger frets take a soft touch.
                            "The blues is the recognition of a tragedy, and the optimism to deal with it" (Fruteland Jackson)

                            "You may think you're playing your instrument, but what you're really playing is the audience" (anonymous)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Maybe you have bigger frets and are used to smaller ones. Bigger frets take a soft touch.
                              "The blues is the recognition of a tragedy, and the optimism to deal with it" (Fruteland Jackson)

                              "You may think you're playing your instrument, but what you're really playing is the audience" (anonymous)

                              Comment



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