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Does more gear equal more talent?

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  • #46
    Funny he keeps "forgetting" to present clips to you.

    He can't hide his flawed logic on tape no matter how much distortion or reverb he uses.

    If he plays like a hack,, he will sound like a hack.


    My first thought runs to this as well '8pm, blues jam, downtown, show me'.

    Not that there aren't valid points to trying out tons of gear, or having better gear, but mainly because I am so sick and tired of the debate, opinions, self appointed experts, and all the other bull****************...so put up or shut up.
    http://sites.google.com/site/bizflyer/

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    • #47
      So why are you so mad at the guy? Do you think he's going around the internet saying he's better than you?


      Well... I have caught him passing off a couple of my songs as his...
      That problem usually solves itself. The dispute lies in why we both have so much gear. With regard to his ability, I consider six guitars, three mid-sized amps and a 4x12 stack for practice at home a little excessive. I have twice as many guitars (though some of them are, admittedly, unnecessary) and two amps (1x10 35W and 2x12 100W).

      I think the general consensus is practice. Different guitars make me practice different styles. Different guitars make his one style sound different.

      To get an idea of his ability, just a few weeks ago we had a group lesson. A drummer friend who is interested in guitar, myself and him. The drummer is actually very good, and he's progressed a lot in the time I've been teaching him. He's perfectly capable of picking up on a riff I'm playing and keeping in time with me. Mr. Expensive Gear... Not so much. We both went through the rhythm with him - just some simple power chords. A to C to G to F to G and repeat. Tempo was given at 128bpm, and the chords are just root notes of the lead, which the drummer would duet with me. He couldn't keep time with us, let alone get the right chords
      Originally Posted by Fork Man


      The answer is, of course, onions.









      Originally Posted by MyNameIsMok...


      Blasphemer! I'll bite your nipples off.









      Originally Posted by nicholai


      All guitars suck. Except for mine. They rock.

      Comment


      • #48
        +1

        By the same token, use the gear you like - not what's "proper" for the genre. One of my peeves, are mindsets such as:

        Teles are only good for country, blues, or classic rock





        Teles can do just about anything.
        Visit Crash Pad at:
        http://CrashPadBand.com
        CONSUME!:
        http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/crashpad
        Gear List/Pics:
        https://sites.google.com/site/briankrashpad/

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        • #49
          Gear doesn't equal talent.
          dharmaforone.bandcamp.comListen to my music and such.Strat - Jazzmaster - Bunch of fuzz and delay pedals - map.

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          • #50

            His reasoning:
            He believes that the more gear he has and the better the quality of it (i.e. how much it's worth or how much it cost), the better his sound will be. The better the sound, the more he can get away with. For example, speedy, accurate lead work can be sloppy so long as there's enough distortion to hide it. Chord work can be sloppy so long as there's a good amount of reverb (which I don't quite understand), and cleans can be sloppy so long as there's a large use of effects like chorus, flange, delay etc etc.


            It's generally the other way around : the more expensive the gear the easier it is to hear every note, which makes mistakes more obvious.
            "The blues is the recognition of a tragedy, and the optimism to deal with it" (Fruteland Jackson)

            "You may think you're playing your instrument, but what you're really playing is the audience" (anonymous)

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            • #51
              Actually, once I got rid of my excessive gear I became a better player. Less time time trying to buy the perfect sound and more time practising to find my perfect sound.
              One MIA Fender Strat, one Gibson Les Paul, one Martin Acoustic, what more do you need?

              http://i1099.photobucket.com/albums/...ps92b32f13.gif

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              • #52
                Actually, once I got rid of my excessive gear I became a better player. Less time time trying to buy the perfect sound and more time practicing to find my perfect sound.
                That's a great point. I've recently sold off a lot of guitars I didn't play much, and a few years ago I sold all but two of my amps. I've really enjoyed finding new tones in my main amp, and really learning how to play it. I've had that amp for ten years, but it wasn't until I downsized that I really started exploring what it could do. Same for my guitars (right now I have one strat and one lp) - there's a whole world in those tone and volume knobs, and since I got down to just a coupe of guitars I spend more time with each. Not that I don't always want more guitars and amps, but there's something to be said for really delving deep into what you already have.
                Multiple award winning blues/rock/country at http://www.zeyerband.com or http://www.reverbnation.com/zeyer.Check my solo (instrumental rock) projects at: http://www.reverbnation.com/vincedickinson"Music is like the English language - it's just full of rules that need to be broken or you aren't hip.""It doesn't take talent to upgrade your playing. It takes patience" - Kenny Werner

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                • #53
                  More distortion does not make bad lead playing anything that it isnt.

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                  • #54
                    If more gear equals more talent, I'm one of the best guitarists that the world has ever seen or heard.

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                    • #55
                      I am proof that you are both wrong.

                      .
                      Please visit my website www.treeguitarworks.com

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                      • #56
                        We're getting a bad impression of your friend. Common sense tells us, justifying playing thru great gear so it can mask his sloppiness is ridiculous. You're serious? As for your guitar for every genre, I can see some worth in that. A big part of growing is being able to cop as many different musical situations as you feel necessary. Hearing that a Les Paul wouldn't work for a Hendrix vibe is.... well, necessary. On the other hand, a guy who doesn't particularly want to SOUND just like Hendrix, Jimmy Page or Alex Laiho, can get the licks on an Ibanez or SG. If by buying different guitars, you were inspired, that's all you can ask for. When I was starting on my musical path, playing gigs and eventually making a decent living, all I could afford was a Strat. My backup was usually owned by the bass player or other guitarist. I HAD to learn different styles on one guitar. All the while though I could HEAR the tonal difference from one genre or artist to another. As I got older and more successful I bought more guitars to 'fit' the Artist or genre. Bottom line is, if I want a Beano vibe, only my Les Paul will do, The Wind Cries Mary begs for a Strat, I wanna hear Taxman on a Casino. Having said all this, my desert island guitar, the 'You can only have one' guitar, is a Tele. It's all we REALLY need!

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                        • #57
                          We're getting a bad impression of your friend. Common sense tells us, justifying playing thru great gear so it can mask his sloppiness is ridiculous. You're serious? As for your guitar for every genre, I can see some worth in that. A big part of growing is being able to cop as many different musical situations as you feel necessary. Hearing that a Les Paul wouldn't work for a Hendrix vibe is.... well, necessary. On the other hand, a guy who doesn't particularly want to SOUND just like Hendrix, Jimmy Page or Alex Laiho, can get the licks on an Ibanez or SG. If by buying different guitars, you were inspired, that's all you can ask for. When I was starting on my musical path, playing gigs and eventually making a decent living, all I could afford was a Strat. My backup was usually owned by the bass player or other guitarist. I HAD to learn different styles on one guitar. All the while though I could HEAR the tonal difference from one genre or artist to another. As I got older and more successful I bought more guitars to 'fit' the Artist or genre. Bottom line is, if I want a Beano vibe, only my Les Paul will do, The Wind Cries Mary begs for a Strat, I wanna hear Taxman on a Casino. Having said all this, my desert island guitar, the 'You can only have one' guitar, is a Tele. It's all we REALLY need!


                          It all makes sense. You certainly have a gift for words, sir. And I agree with you... A Tele will do anything you ask of it!

                          As for my friend (can I just call him Dan from now on? Getting kinda tired ), I think he means well. But he lacks experience and discipline. Like many members of my generation, he's lazy and refuses to value wisdom over pride. He's jumped right into accumulating gear and after one refresher lesson from me, he thought he was ready to jam along with me even though when we originally took lessons, he stopped after a few months. Having observed his behaviour, he's generally more interested in computing and gaming than he is in the guitar. The guitar to him is something for other people to observe and revere, not as an extension of himself.

                          Personally, I was playing for twelve years before I started buying more guitars. So I suppose that in my initial statement, I was wrong. I learned most genres on one Squier Strat (I had a Bullet as well, but alas, it was dead until very recently). It wasn't until I could afford more guitars that I started matching the guitar to the genre for an authentic sound. Having those more suitable guitars opened up new worlds for me and made me want to practice a wider range of music. Really motivated me. For instance, I love the sound of a neck pickup on a Strat for certain music, but for more Alexi-orientated shredding, it's gotta be a high-output bridge humbucker.

                          My desert island guitar? I honestly couldn't decide. I love them all and play them all. At a push... Washburn KC, if it had some new pickups. It's versatile, but it lacks in certain areas.
                          Originally Posted by Fork Man


                          The answer is, of course, onions.









                          Originally Posted by MyNameIsMok...


                          Blasphemer! I'll bite your nipples off.









                          Originally Posted by nicholai


                          All guitars suck. Except for mine. They rock.

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            There's a guy in my wife's band that is a worse player than me by far, has to watch the other guitarists hands, has no concepts of scales, doesn't learn on first try, vs me who doesn't have to be told anything and has a perfect ear and can play anything back, but his gear is right, his sound is flawless. My wife yelled at the band for letting him in over me, but truth is, his sound owned mine, whether my solos were better or not technically, and whether my melodies were better and more complimentary and interesting, his off solos sounded better with the right sound. Sigh. I just learned a hard lesson last week. They asked me if I was willing to play Lap steel. Lol. I haven't played lap in over 2 years.

                            Im not saying gear>talent, but sometimes talent is knowing which knob to turn.
                            Originally Posted by csm


                            You get a limited-edition self-relic'ing guitar at no extra cost and you're COMPLAINING?



                            [Insert religious affiliation political party and or spiritual belief here]

                            57 Gibson Cg-530, 66 Teisco Mosrite "clone", 78 Rickenbacker something or other, 80's St. Blues, Classic Vibe 60's strat, Fender Blacktop HH strat, Switch Sig Stein, Switch Tele style, Austin SG, Yamaha something, lol.
                            Vox Ampeg Peavey Hartke Bogen and Bugera amps, every tube pedal i can find. Muff. Loopers.

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                            • #59
                              Obviously you guys seem to have different points of view on gear and playing. I do not know how anyone can think they only have to see a technique or tab once and fifteen minutes later will master it. I do not like to spend forever on a song I have to learn, but if I am going to learn it I will learn it right. I have seen a lot of guys who do a tab and have the right chords and notes, but do not have the groove or the flow of the solo remotely correct.Also the best way to practice something new is clean! The more gain and distortion that is used is going to mask a lot of clams and if you practice with bad habits it will eventually carry over into your playing.

                              My most productive period of woodshedding was 15 years with 2 guitars -a tricked out MIJ Tele with stacked humbuckers and an acoustic. I still love that ax though it has been long retired,but no other guitar I own will ever come close to having the hours logged onto it as that one has. Both of you guys seem to have been at this for sometime and you both have different approaches to gear and playing. From what you have written I would say you are going down the right path while your partner seems to opt for short cuts as well as sounding like he has a pretty big ego lol. Yes it is nice to have the best gear that suits your needs, but if you are in this for the love of playing that should be priority #1. I am certain there is some friendly rivalry to all of this but in the world of guitar playing there is no cut and dry right or wrong to anything. Just keep doing what your doing and let your playing do your talking for ya!

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                              • #60
                                i've crunched the numbers, yes it's true

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