Harmony Central Forums
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Head + Cabinet in the 2000$ range for blues, 70s rock, etc

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse









X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Head + Cabinet in the 2000$ range for blues, 70s rock, etc

    Hey guys,

     

    I guess the title pretty much sums it up. I have a bad back and a sharp ear so I want to stay away from heavy combo amps and don't want to settle for a small one. What Head + Cabinet would you recommend ? Again, I'm into blues, early rock, warm tubesque tones, overdriven P90s, single coils, I dig my SGs too but don't really know what to expect from those humbuckers at this point.

    To be honest, I am a newbie when it comes to amplifications even though I have a more than decent guitar collection (American Strats, Japanese Teles, American SGs and P90 Les Paul, Epi 339, Squier strat and Jazzmaster). I guess I just build pyramids from bottom to top. What amp and cabinet would produce great tones with these fine instruments and some elbow grease from yours truly?

    As a bluesy oriented guy, I'm naturally interested in the Fender Supersonic head. But I wouldn't know what to match it with, and what else to consider.

    The money is not an issue at the moment, but I'd be happy to stay in the 2000$ range unless something really stands out and makes it worthwile to spend a little more. Again, I'd like to stay away from extremely heavy units.

    Just to keep an open-mind, I'd be interested in a light combo if you know of one which doesn't weigh much but sounds ballsy nonetheless.

    Thanks for your help melodic community of the world!

    "The blues is the recognition of a tragedy, and the optimism to deal with it" (Fruteland Jackson)

    "You may think you're playing your instrument, but what you're really playing is the audience" (anonymous)

  • #2
    You could put a Tiny Terror on top of a cab and you will get some awesome overdrive tones.

    For Fender amps, the only one that I've used and really liked was the Bandmaster.
    Guitars: 3 Fender Strats, Fender Jazzmaster, Squier Bullet, 2 Gibson Les Pauls, Gibson ES-339, Gibson Les Paul Jr. Special, Epiphone Les Paul, Epiphone Dot, Epiphone SG, PRS SE Custom 24, Ibanez AS73, Hamer Duotone, Larrivee D-03R, Takamine EG5013S, 1951 Epiphone Devon, Ibanez SR305 (bass)Pedal Chain: BBE Green Screamer -> MXR Distortion III -> Boss CE-5 -> EH Stereo Pulsar -> Boss DD-20 -> BBE Boosta GrandeAmps: Vox AC4, AC15, AC30, Pathfinder 10, DA5SoundCloud

    Comment


    • #3

      If you want something custom built, you might look up a Valvetech Hayseed. They have a 25 and 50 watt and would be well below your price range for a head version. These are designed on the Vox platform. Heard nothing but excellent things about them and their customer service years after the sale.

      A couple of guys that post here own them. When I move up to a custom built amp, I'm definitely going to give them a consideration.

      Comment


      • isuck
        isuck commented
        Editing a comment
        Mesa Mini Rectifier and two mini cabs. Don't let the name fool you. This little amp does an awesome job at those early electric blues tones.

    • #4

      I think you can get better answers if you are more specific in the sound you want (bands and guitarists names).... With your budget you should definitely be able to get something you are happy with.  I know you said no combos, but for classic blues sounds it is going to be hard to beat an old Fender or something based of one.  For 70s blues/rock tones something like a Marshall JMP would do the trick.  There is a lot of stuff out there being made by smaller companies that is really nice, but it's hard to get your hands on it to play it before buying. 

       

      In your price range you will end up with something that will last you a lifetime.  You are in great shape.

      http://www.reverbnation.com/thedubiouscapture

      Comment


      • mschafft
        mschafft commented
        Editing a comment

        Thanks guys. Here are a few names : John Frusciante, Eric Mc Fadden, Popa Chubby, Rory Gallagher, The Kinks, Oasis, Springsteen, Queens of the Stone Age, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, ZZ Top, Muddy Waters, Ry Cooder, SRV, The Last Shadow Puppets, Keef Richards, Chuck Berry, Angus Young, etc.

        So basically more overdrive than distortion, juicy tones rather than excessively heavy tones, dynamics, power-blues from muffled gritty rhythm to bright yet round sounding fenderish treble.

        Does it help narrowing things down a little ?

         


    • #5
      A swart ast pro or space tone combo one weighs around 30lbs and come in right around 2k. That's lighter than a lot of heads by themselves. Or the Carr mercury is another great sounding combo that won't be a back buster.

      Comment


      • Ratae Corieltauvorum
        Editing a comment

        kit_strong wrote:
        A swart ast pro or space tone combo one weighs around 30lbs and come in right around 2k. That's lighter than a lot of heads by themselves. Or the Carr mercury is another great sounding combo that won't be a back buster.

        I endorse this post, I plugged my R7 into a friends SWART at his studio a few weeks back and it sounded like a full sonic makeover, astounding amps

         


    • #6
      HiWatt

      Comment


      • #7
        According to Noel Gallagher, he always used AC30 heads into Marshall cabs. I think that most of your list uses Marshall.
        Guitars: 3 Fender Strats, Fender Jazzmaster, Squier Bullet, 2 Gibson Les Pauls, Gibson ES-339, Gibson Les Paul Jr. Special, Epiphone Les Paul, Epiphone Dot, Epiphone SG, PRS SE Custom 24, Ibanez AS73, Hamer Duotone, Larrivee D-03R, Takamine EG5013S, 1951 Epiphone Devon, Ibanez SR305 (bass)Pedal Chain: BBE Green Screamer -> MXR Distortion III -> Boss CE-5 -> EH Stereo Pulsar -> Boss DD-20 -> BBE Boosta GrandeAmps: Vox AC4, AC15, AC30, Pathfinder 10, DA5SoundCloud

        Comment


        • #8
          @prawnheed
          Hiwatts are awesome.
          Guitars: 3 Fender Strats, Fender Jazzmaster, Squier Bullet, 2 Gibson Les Pauls, Gibson ES-339, Gibson Les Paul Jr. Special, Epiphone Les Paul, Epiphone Dot, Epiphone SG, PRS SE Custom 24, Ibanez AS73, Hamer Duotone, Larrivee D-03R, Takamine EG5013S, 1951 Epiphone Devon, Ibanez SR305 (bass)Pedal Chain: BBE Green Screamer -> MXR Distortion III -> Boss CE-5 -> EH Stereo Pulsar -> Boss DD-20 -> BBE Boosta GrandeAmps: Vox AC4, AC15, AC30, Pathfinder 10, DA5SoundCloud

          Comment


          • Special J
            Special J commented
            Editing a comment

            kayd_mon wrote:
            @prawnheed
            Hiwatts are awesome.

            After playing through one quite a bit lately, I have to agree that Hiwatts are pretty awesome, but not what I'd recommend in his situation. They aren't particularly light at all, and not terribly versatile either. I think most of the great classic tones that people associate with Hiwatts are either coming from Rangemasters or Big Muffs.


            Unfortunately with good amp tone and quality construction also often comes some weight. Big power transformers, tube circuits, alnico speakers, birch cabinets - all heavy stuff.

             

             

             

             


        • #9

          For $2000 you have a huge range of options sonically. If I were you I would start considering how complex you want this rig to be. For example, are you interested in all the versatility of a Mark V, or even a Triaxis running into a Tech 21 Power Engine? Or do you just want a solid amp with two channels and a very responsive three-band tone stack?

          Comment


          • mschafft
            mschafft commented
            Editing a comment

            Okay thanks. If most of my list play Marshall, that has to be a sign... A Marshall Cab it could be then. I wouldn't mind an amp and preamp if that gives more versatility to the combination. I'm really grateful for your suggestions guys. Could you please name the brand names because I can't figure out what is what based on the models names only, I'm that new to it. Cheers

             


        • #10
          IMO, you can get the tones of your whole list pretty easily with an Orange. A Dual Terror plus a nice cab (an Orange 4x12 or even a Marshall one) can do what you're describing. The Orange Tiny Terror and Dual Terror are really great at getting nice, thick overdrive, whether it's just breakup or full on. It can do the on-the-edge clean/crunch of Frusciante, the fat crunch of AC/DC, the full-tilt overdrive of Oasis, and more. They are a series of amp almost dedicated to awesome overdrive. They can go clean, but they break up fast.
          Guitars: 3 Fender Strats, Fender Jazzmaster, Squier Bullet, 2 Gibson Les Pauls, Gibson ES-339, Gibson Les Paul Jr. Special, Epiphone Les Paul, Epiphone Dot, Epiphone SG, PRS SE Custom 24, Ibanez AS73, Hamer Duotone, Larrivee D-03R, Takamine EG5013S, 1951 Epiphone Devon, Ibanez SR305 (bass)Pedal Chain: BBE Green Screamer -> MXR Distortion III -> Boss CE-5 -> EH Stereo Pulsar -> Boss DD-20 -> BBE Boosta GrandeAmps: Vox AC4, AC15, AC30, Pathfinder 10, DA5SoundCloud

          Comment


          • Danhedonia
            Danhedonia commented
            Editing a comment
            What's the possible uses of the amp? Gigging? Rehearsal? Blasting the basement walls? If you're looking for a half stack, I assume you're playing out ....

            ... and you keep talking about Fenders - why not get one? Find a nice used Bandmaster. Also, would suggest that careful strategizing with casters will open up cab options for you ...

            I just played a new Supersonic combo and really liked it for LOUD, slightly overdriven to insanely overdriven sounds - but thought the speakers and cab on the combo lacked balls. Maybe a SS head?

            The Marshall JMP is also a good suggestion.

            Then again, you could offer me any of those, and the only one I'd trade my Egnater Rebel 30 for would be the Bandmaster. just sayin'.

        • #11
          Is the Marshall good with single-coil guitars too?
          "The blues is the recognition of a tragedy, and the optimism to deal with it" (Fruteland Jackson)

          "You may think you're playing your instrument, but what you're really playing is the audience" (anonymous)

          Comment


          • Mister Zero
            Mister Zero commented
            Editing a comment

            mschafft wrote:
            Is the Marshall good with single-coil guitars too?

            Jimi sure thought so.


        • #12

          Had the chance to play a recent black face Deluxe Reverb this afternoon. Liked it well. If the blues deluxe has the same kind of warmth and headroom I think Thomann's discount might help me close the deal there. Plus I suppose a tweed blues deluxe is probably not too hard to sell if I need to change in a few years. So that's basically the blues part covered, right. I plan to have fun with that before ordering some Orange stuff for the heavier riffs. If any one has something to say against the purchase of a Fender Tweed Blues Deluxe combo let them speak now... ;-)

          "The blues is the recognition of a tragedy, and the optimism to deal with it" (Fruteland Jackson)

          "You may think you're playing your instrument, but what you're really playing is the audience" (anonymous)

          Comment


          • #13
            Right, thank you, and that's ruling out the Blues Deluxe because it's too loud? Or not suited for rock tones? The blues reverb was powerful enough I guess, but I definitely wouldn't like anything quieter. The BD is cheaper, more powerful, and possibly easier to sell without a big loss, that's why I'm asking.
            "The blues is the recognition of a tragedy, and the optimism to deal with it" (Fruteland Jackson)

            "You may think you're playing your instrument, but what you're really playing is the audience" (anonymous)

            Comment


            • Mad Tele
              Mad Tele commented
              Editing a comment

              mschafft wrote:
              Right, thank you, and that's ruling out the Blues Deluxe because it's too loud? Or not suited for rock tones? The blues reverb was powerful enough I guess, but I definitely wouldn't like anything quieter. The BD is cheaper, more powerful, and possibly easier to sell without a big loss, that's why I'm asking.

              well i only played one in a store, and couldnt really crank it. But the supersonic, and deluxe reverb are mucb better amps IMO. Its all subjective though. But it is hard to beat a 65 deluxe reverb. That is an iconic Fender amp for a reason. 

              this guy is using a deluxe reverb straight in. 


          • #14

            Thanks everyone!

            "The blues is the recognition of a tragedy, and the optimism to deal with it" (Fruteland Jackson)

            "You may think you're playing your instrument, but what you're really playing is the audience" (anonymous)

            Comment


            • mschafft
              mschafft commented
              Editing a comment

              A 65 Reverb Deluxe it will be.

               


          • #15
            ... I played a Super Sonic 22 this afternoon. Might be the ticket.
            "The blues is the recognition of a tragedy, and the optimism to deal with it" (Fruteland Jackson)

            "You may think you're playing your instrument, but what you're really playing is the audience" (anonymous)

            Comment



            Working...
            X