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Gibson ES-335 Rubber Neck?

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  • Gibson ES-335 Rubber Neck?

    I have a 335 I bought in 2011, from the moment I got it the neck had way too much relief (bends were fretting out, and the action was too high, when i lowered the bridge, the higher notes would just fret out)

    I got a tech to straighten it. It came back playing a lot better, and later i bought my own truss rod tool to avoid further unnecessary visits to a tech

    However for some reason the action seemed to creep up on me (i wasn't moving the bridge) and the neck always seemed to not want to stabilize,

     
     and I would always be tightening the truss rod to compensate.
     
    I read 
    and it actually seemed to have a similar problem, is this common in gibsons? my tele, schecter, and ric 330 have never had this issue at all.
     
     
    Right now the action is fairly low, but the truss rod won't budge now (except in the opposite direction adding relief) so i have made no efforts to tighten it anymore, but i fear soon the action will inevitably rise again....

  • #2

    Sorry to hear that and no I don't believe it's a common problem with Gibsons.  My experience with my Studio Lite has been nothing but stellar - set up once in the two years I've had it with no truss adjustments.  I hope you can get it sorted out.

    The most important thing I look for in a musician is whether he knows how to listen --Duke Ellington

    Comment


    • *BLEEP*
      *BLEEP* commented
      Editing a comment

      Let me see... ES-335?  A rather thin profile (speed) neck???  Meat = Stability.  

       


  • #3

    PuerAeternus wrote:

     and later i bought my own truss rod tool to avoid further unnecessary visits to a tech

     


    Unless you have real skills, I wouldn't do that.

    <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot;It's all sratched up, Zuzu&quot;</div><br><br>Your wattage may vary

    Comment


    • PuerAeternus
      PuerAeternus commented
      Editing a comment
      I don't see what I could have done wrong; I only adjusted it when I saw the gap at the 7th fret when using the E string as a straight edge pressed down (the gap should be very small or almost non-existent for a straight neck, which gives the lowest possible action with minimal buzzing and easy bends that don't fret out)
      every time i saw the gap got wider and the action felt higher, i adjusted the truss rod ( i already had the bridge set up where i wanted it, so i knew any action change has to be the truss rod)

      don't see how a tech would do this differently

    • billybilly
      billybilly commented
      Editing a comment

      akapuli wrote:

      PuerAeternus wrote:

       and later i bought my own truss rod tool to avoid further unnecessary visits to a tech

       


      Unless you have real skills, I wouldn't do that.


       

      Adjusting a truss rod is guitar tech 101.  Everyone should be able to do it and it's not hard.  Just turn 1/8 at a time and let it settle, it's not rocket science.


  • #4
    I have four Gibsons, and I've not needed to adjust the truss rods on them. I would definitely call Gibson and explain the problem to them.
    <div class="signaturecontainer"><b>Guitars:</b> 3 Fender Strats, Fender Jazzmaster, Squier Bullet, 2 Gibson Les Pauls, Gibson ES-339, Gibson Les Paul Jr. Special, Epiphone Les Paul, Epiphone Dot, Epiphone SG, PRS SE Custom 24, Ibanez AS73, Hamer Duotone, Larrivee D-03R, Takamine EG5013S, 1951 Epiphone Devon, Ibanez SR305 (bass)<br><br><br><br><b>Pedal Chain:</b> BBE Green Screamer -&gt; MXR Distortion III -&gt; Boss CE-5 -&gt; EH Stereo Pulsar -&gt; Boss DD-20 -&gt; BBE Boosta Grande<br><br><br><br><b>Amps:</b> Vox AC4, AC15, AC30, Pathfinder 10, DA5<br><br><br><br><a target="_blank" href="http://soundcloud.com/andrewalderman">SoundCloud</a></div>

    Comment


    • #5
      How much did you turn the rod at once? I believe that the "proper" way to do it is a quarter turn at a time, and then give the neck time to settle.
      <div class="signaturecontainer"><b>Guitars:</b> 3 Fender Strats, Fender Jazzmaster, Squier Bullet, 2 Gibson Les Pauls, Gibson ES-339, Gibson Les Paul Jr. Special, Epiphone Les Paul, Epiphone Dot, Epiphone SG, PRS SE Custom 24, Ibanez AS73, Hamer Duotone, Larrivee D-03R, Takamine EG5013S, 1951 Epiphone Devon, Ibanez SR305 (bass)<br><br><br><br><b>Pedal Chain:</b> BBE Green Screamer -&gt; MXR Distortion III -&gt; Boss CE-5 -&gt; EH Stereo Pulsar -&gt; Boss DD-20 -&gt; BBE Boosta Grande<br><br><br><br><b>Amps:</b> Vox AC4, AC15, AC30, Pathfinder 10, DA5<br><br><br><br><a target="_blank" href="http://soundcloud.com/andrewalderman">SoundCloud</a></div>

      Comment


      • PuerAeternus
        PuerAeternus commented
        Editing a comment

        I basically have a Schecter C-1 that has the straighest neck ever with the best playability, I just turned the truss rod till i got the playabaility of the gibson around the same as the schecter, without too much buzzing on the lower frets. 
        given the schecter will probably play slightly easier because of the larger radius and lighter strings (9's compared to 10's) ---- just trying to get the actions more similar

         

        The schecter action is always constantly low and playability is the best out of my guitars, so every time i felt the action of the gibson was getting too far away from the schecter i tweaked the truss rod to get them to match closer

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