Harmony Central Forums
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Cherry wood for guitar body

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse









X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Based on the stuff I read here, it should be perfect for a solidbody.

    I also wonder, if you have a whole tree at your disposal, is it possible to get a wood piece that big to do both neck and body out of it? I mean with no glue or bolts for connection.
    It stimulates, regenerates
    It's therapeutic healing
    It lifts our feet up off the ground
    And blasts us through the ceiling

    HEAVY METAL

    Comment


    • #17
      There are a lot of perfectly good hardwoods that aren't customarily used for guitars (e.g. walnut, myrtlewood, redwood, olive, etc.) because they aren't what Fender and Gibson used in 1950. Again, it goes to show how amazingly conservative (as a group) guitarists are. If everybody were like this, we'd all still be driving Model Ts and watching television on our 7" Motorolas...
      You have the right to free speech, as long as you're not dumb enough to actually try it. -- Joe Strummer

      Comment


      • #18
        redwood is really really soft, i used it for a laminate top before, it dents easier than pine, myrtle wood is used for acoustics all over the place, and walnut is pretty widely used, but severely expensive for good material.
        HCAF's resident meathead.

        Comment


        • #19
          redwood is really really soft, i used it for a laminate top before, it dents easier than pine, myrtle wood is used for acoustics all over the place, and walnut is pretty widely used, but severely expensive for good material.


          Yeah - but I mean on mass-produced instruments. The market still pretty much demands ash-alder-mahogany. Even Poplar (which sounds fantastic in teles, in my experience) was pretty much rejected by the market.
          You have the right to free speech, as long as you're not dumb enough to actually try it. -- Joe Strummer

          Comment


          • #20
            Yeah - but I mean on mass-produced instruments. The market still pretty much demands ash-alder-mahogany. Even Poplar (which sounds fantastic in teles, in my experience) was pretty much rejected by the market.


            my MIM Precision is poplar. sounds good to me, especially for $200.
            The Common Sense Mets Fan

            There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there always has been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge." - Isaac Asimov, Newsweek (21 January 1980)

            Comment


            • #21
              Based on the stuff I read here, it should be perfect for a solidbody.

              I also wonder, if you have a whole tree at your disposal, is it possible to get a wood piece that big to do both neck and body out of it? I mean with no glue or bolts for connection.



              Bright, long sustain and heavy all sound good to me. I'm 6'6'' and a big guy myself. So a heavy guitar would counter balance maybe lol. Just need a thick strap.

              I do have the whole tree at my disposal.. if the ****************er isnt rotten inside. I have heard of people doing that. But honestly.. this is my first guitar/luthier project ever. So I am not that skilled I dont think to make a guitar out of one solid piece lol.
              "I bet Jaymz Hetfield gives out a loud bellowing "OH YEAH!!!" when he takes poo".

              Comment


              • #22
                Tim and terrys has been in business in gainesville for longer than I can rember, several decades. I was talking with tim and he said cherry is about the workability of maple, the weight of poplar, and the sound of mahogany with extra high end. Said that cherry and poplar are the two most under utilized tonewoods.
                Came from a discussion about the T-45 they had in there that was made of oak(beast, but sounded great).
                There's a few folks who have made "barncasters" out of cherry on the TDPRI, so i'd ask there.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Also, Let this wood dry for a god 2+ years if you're getting 2 inches thick anywhere on it.
                  Meanwhile, get pallets folks are throwing away and practice on all the pine and oak you can get for free making bodies and necks. You'll be way happy gearing up to use this undoubtedly gorgeous wood for a 1 piece body/neck type build than basically wrecking it in an early build.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    The hard part is going to be drying it out. You have to stack it in a way that air will circulate though it for years for it to stabilize.

                    Here you go, though:

                    Originally Posted by DToad:

                    Lets face it- today's GOP is all about the richest one percent exploiting the dumbest fifty percent.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Bright, long sustain and heavy all sound good to me. I'm 6'6'' and a big guy myself. So a heavy guitar would counter balance maybe lol. Just need a thick strap.

                      I do have the whole tree at my disposal.. if the ****************er isnt rotten inside. I have heard of people doing that. But honestly.. this is my first guitar/luthier project ever. So I am not that skilled I dont think to make a guitar out of one solid piece lol.


                      Well, then make it neck-through: bolting-on or setting-in the neck with proper angle should be a bit of extra work and provide room for more errors, AFAIK... Never went with a project myself, so don't quote me on this; but I really think that using a whole tree for a short neck (and destroying the fret access on a V with a heel) would be a waste.

                      Although you can use the spare planks to create some bodies to place completed bolt-on necks on... I see cheap Strats with good necks all the time, but rarely with decent, one or two piece bodies. Especially from heavier woods.
                      It stimulates, regenerates
                      It's therapeutic healing
                      It lifts our feet up off the ground
                      And blasts us through the ceiling

                      HEAVY METAL

                      Comment


                      • #26

                        I also wonder, if you have a whole tree at your disposal, is it possible to get a wood piece that big to do both neck and body out of it? I mean with no glue or bolts for connection.
                        Most luthiers and wood workers would recommend against that as that configuration would tend to warp. Also it wouldn't be a strong.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Most luthiers and wood workers would recommend against that as that configuration would tend to warp. Also it wouldn't be a strong.


                          Even a truss rod won't save it? Or you mean that the body would warp?

                          What about a neck-through with a single-piece neck then? I see most of the manufacturers using three to five pieced necks, is it for added strength?
                          It stimulates, regenerates
                          It's therapeutic healing
                          It lifts our feet up off the ground
                          And blasts us through the ceiling

                          HEAVY METAL

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            The wood would warp(if it were to warp) during drying as a board, but you could compensate for that upon the carving out of the body/neck from the block so long as it isn't totally ****************ed.
                            As for strength, grain aligned close to how it is in the tree tends to do well. if the tree is large enough a whole body/neck could be made from the heartwood, there won't be any stability problems. And you would need a truss rod regardless.

                            It's totally possible, the wood is the main limitation.

                            As for the reason a lot of neck throughs are multi-pieced is the fact they're copying rickenbacker.

                            Basically(depending on design) your neck/body 1 piece blank would have to measure about 2"x14"x35"(at time of cutting). You could use the parts you carve off when making the neck portion for 2-piece bodies and/or 1-piece necks.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Good point. It's not the worth the risk to their milling tools.


                              No it's not worth the risk of a nail or what ever flying off a saw blade and killing a worker.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                No it's not worth the risk of a nail or what ever flying off a saw blade and killing a worker.


                                Reclaimed lumber places are springing up more commonly around the US, and they generally run over the trees with a metal detector and mill things a bit differently in general.

                                Comment



                                Working...
                                X