Harmony Central Forums
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

best Les Paul copy

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse









X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • best Les Paul copy

    I'm pretty sure it'll b na epiphone but thought I'd ask, tbh I'm going through a pretty long GnR stage and really fancy a slash style LP, don't have unlimited money so an actual Gibson signature is out the question

     

    what would you recommend ?


  • #2
    Check out the Japanese copies - burny, tokai, etc. Someone like soundcreation on here can hopefully chime in and tell you a lot more. Used is the way to go. Good luck with your search!
    INTERNET stands for: Inter-connected Network of Tools Endlessly Regurgitating Negatively Energized Tantrums

    My Guitars | ... but can he play? | Currently a Gold Trader +6

    Use extreme caution when attempting to interact or transact with IndianScout.

    Comment


    • mercury2
      mercury2 commented
      Editing a comment

      cheers, will take a look at those names

      I'm in the UK btw, incase that affects choice/availability


    • GreatDane
      GreatDane commented
      Editing a comment

      GreatDane wrote:
      Check out the Japanese copies - burny, tokai, etc. Someone like soundcreation on here can hopefully chime in and tell you a lot more. Used is the way to go. Good luck with your search!

      also look into Edwards, Orville, Bacchus, Greco.  all pretty top-notch, from what i hear and read.


  • #3
    The best LP clone I've seen, heard, and played is certainly the ESP/LTD EC-1000 Deluxe. The amber burst one has a Duncan JB/59 combo which is nice. There's a bit more flash, with its flamey top and abalone appointments, but it's a top notch clone.

    IMO, Epiphones aren't copies, as they were endorsed by Les Paul, they say Les Paul on the headstock, have the correct shape, mostly the correct specs, etc. They are the real deal, but cheaper. You can probably score a secondhand Epi for a low price, and you'll have most of what you're looking for. They even make an Epi Slash model or two, if you keep an eye out.
    Guitars: 3 Fender Strats, Fender Jazzmaster, Squier Bullet, 2 Gibson Les Pauls, Gibson ES-339, Gibson Les Paul Jr. Special, Epiphone Les Paul, Epiphone Dot, Epiphone SG, PRS SE Custom 24, Ibanez AS73, Hamer Duotone, Larrivee D-03R, Takamine EG5013S, 1951 Epiphone Devon, Ibanez SR305 (bass)Pedal Chain: BBE Green Screamer -> MXR Distortion III -> Boss CE-5 -> EH Stereo Pulsar -> Boss DD-20 -> BBE Boosta GrandeAmps: Vox AC4, AC15, AC30, Pathfinder 10, DA5SoundCloud

    Comment


    • Dougy
      Dougy commented
      Editing a comment

      kayd\_mon wrote:
      They even make an Epi Slash model or two, if you keep an eye out.

       

      I always liked the look of those, the cherry red one with the 'Snakepit' logo.

      slash LP.jpg

      Attached Files

  • #4
    @soundcreation

    Isn't Orville the Japanese market Gibson? As in totally licensed, etc?
    Guitars: 3 Fender Strats, Fender Jazzmaster, Squier Bullet, 2 Gibson Les Pauls, Gibson ES-339, Gibson Les Paul Jr. Special, Epiphone Les Paul, Epiphone Dot, Epiphone SG, PRS SE Custom 24, Ibanez AS73, Hamer Duotone, Larrivee D-03R, Takamine EG5013S, 1951 Epiphone Devon, Ibanez SR305 (bass)Pedal Chain: BBE Green Screamer -> MXR Distortion III -> Boss CE-5 -> EH Stereo Pulsar -> Boss DD-20 -> BBE Boosta GrandeAmps: Vox AC4, AC15, AC30, Pathfinder 10, DA5SoundCloud

    Comment


    • soundcreation
      soundcreation commented
      Editing a comment

      kayd_mon wrote:
      @soundcreation

      Isn't Orville the Japanese market Gibson? As in totally licensed, etc?

      Was.   They stopped making them in the late 90's I think?  The lower end "Orville" models basically turned into the Epiphone Elitist, and the higher end "Orville by Gibson's" were just discontinued.

      At the time it was Gibson's attempt to get back Japanese domestic sales that had been lost to companies like Greco, Burny, and Tokai.  They contracted a couple factories over there to build them with permission to use the name.  But somebody in japan had already registered the "gibson" name so they just chose to use his first name. 


  • #5

    I'd definitly try/check out the Vintage brand guitars. Decent prices and great quality.

    This is the Paradise model.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=PnW3_qqy_r0#!

     

    If you're in the UK and have an epiphone price range I personally only trust Epi (I love mine) and Vintage. Any  other one may be, too pricey, too cheap quality, or too different to what you're after.

    I'm Me.Guild GAD M120E2006 50s Classic series MIM Fender Stratocaster 2 tone sunburst.2004 Epi LP Standard in Trans Blue With Tonerider Alnico 297 Epi LP Junior Red with pots, caps and the magnets in the pickup repleaced.Vox pathfinder 15RVox VT 15

    Comment


    • #6

      The best Les Paul copy is more expensive than most Gibsons, so thats not the answer.

       

      You'll need to factor in a pickup and electronic swap into almost any Asian built LP copy you buy, which using Irongear or Tonerider work aout to between 60-80 quid, then four new CTS pots and two caps and a bit of soldering.

       

      Your chassis could be a Vintage, the stock pups are OKish, but the LP clones vary in weight from heavy to bloody heavy. There a lot of used Japanese LPs out there at the moment and seemingly going for around 450 stock, so factor in the upgrades/improvemenst you're looking at around 550ish

       

      In your position with that money I'd be looking at a PRS SE245

       

      Make an offer on this one

       

      Also check out these ESP/LTDs, but be prepared for slender necks

       

      Edwards was mentioned earlier, and this one is from a few years ago, very likely to be a nice weight and with Seymour Duncan pickups which will allow you to seel the pickups if you don't like them and get something you like (I'm not a fan of the JB bridge pickup)

      You should get it for around

      Music is a moral law. It gives soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination, and charm and gaiety to life and to everything. - Plato

      Comment


      • #7
        The OP wants "the best LP copy", but it has to be less $$ than a Gibson. The best LP copies cost as much or more than a Gibson, so this should say "best budget LP copy".

        "Yes - I'd like the best wine you have. I have $15 to spend."

        Comment


        • Bucksstudent
          Bucksstudent commented
          Editing a comment

          koiwoi wrote:
          The OP wants "the best LP copy", but it has to be less $$ than a Gibson. The best LP copies cost as much or more than a Gibson, so this should say "best budget LP copy".

          "Yes - I'd like the best wine you have. I have $15 to spend."

          The thread is almost a year old. I think the OP is beyond it by now.

          ...and you can buy good LP copies for far less than a Gibson, as well as good wine for under $15 dollars.


      • #8
        Captain obvious saves the day...

        He said best, not good.

        Comment


        • Bucksstudent
          Bucksstudent commented
          Editing a comment

          koiwoi wrote:
          Captain obvious saves the day...

          He said best, not good.

          If it was so obvious, then why do you even care what the OP wants? It's been almost a year. I've never seen that member post in this section since.


      • #9
        Agile al 3xxx mahog body and neck, ebony fb some even have ss frets. Alnico pups good pots wires hardware and nut. Hand polished frets. Beatiful finishes. Perfect return policy Cant go wrong.
        Even the new gibson lpj, lpm and studios now have maple necks

        Comment


        • elantric
          elantric commented
          Editing a comment

          Epi\_Classic US Goldtop

          epi2

           

          epi3

          epi4

           

          This Epiphone Custom Shop "Classic US Goldtop" was priced right = $400 back in 2009 and in flawless shape. Its typically never seen in the USA - they are targeted for the Japanese market. 

          Setup was better than my Dark fire, and due to the 1958 neck profile  - I feel right at home.

          The rumor is these are "Slash" models - without the "Slash" trussrod cover, and need to pay Slash a royalty.

          I never played an Epi  Slash - so I can not compare it to this "Classic US Goldtop".  But I can tell you this one has a FAT Neck profile  - chunkier than any Asian Epiphone i ever played. 

            
          Ironically,  these rare Epiphone's with vintage geometry specs are not commonly available here in the USA, because the current generation of young guitarists who visit Guitar center want a slim JEM Wizard neck -and frown on any guitar with a thick baseball bat /  "horse leg" neck profile. So much so that Epiphone USA does not sell this "Classic US Goldtop" model here in the USA(?). Although this may have more to do with not competing with the Epi Slash model.

          This Epiphone "Classic US Goldtop" has real 1958 specs, a Long Neck Tenon, factory equipped with Seymour Duncan Alnico II PAFS, Nickel Hardware(!!)  and although its Polyester - it feels 1000\% better than the "plasticy" new $900 2009 Epiphone '59 LP standard i almost bought.

          You would think the pots/switch/jack would require replacement prior to gigging, but this one has very high quality electronics, all equal or superior to CTS/switchcraft IMHO.

           Compared to my 1973 LP, Its rather light at 8.3 lbs  - it appears to be genuine materials - NOT plywood  , and sounds great!!

          What i've discovered is that you cant trust the "Neck Profile description" on most ebay Gibsons and Epiphones.
          there are a few exceptions - like the Jeff Beck Oxblood, or the "ES335 Fat Neck" - but most ebay sellers seem to think its important to include in the description "slender 1960's profile"  - when in fact the profile on the actual instrument is indeed a fat 1958 Neck profile. 

          And i found a few folks advertise they have a "2002 Gibson LP Studio with a "'chunky 59 Neck Profile" - that is nothing more than just the regular Gibson USA  production CNC machine cookie cutter 1962 slim Neck Profile they use on 90\% of the current USA standard production models build on Massman Ave, Nashville, TN.

          I know a few pro players who ordered a $5K Warren Haynes Custom shop LP  - just to have a Gibson LP with that proper fat 1950's neck. 


          By contrast the regular production Gibson USA LPs all have a "too thin" neck on them. i cant play them, because I get  nothing but shooting pains in my forearm if i should be forced to play a slim neck for a whole 3 hour gig. 

          Seems to be a specifically designed plan - if you want a new 2010 Gibson Les Paul with an authentic 50's fat neck profile, you must pony up $4k-8k and order from the Custom Shop .  I had an opportunity to work as a consultant to Gibson USA for a couple weeks, must have played every Gibson guitar in the main Gibson USA plant on Massman Ave. - Flying Vee's, Explorers,    Firebirds, Les pauls, SGs, Eye Guitar,  etc - i found most Gibsons USA models have a near identical thin 1960's neck profile. A few have the assymetrical neck - ( Dark Fire, LP Standard, LP Access, the beefiest  standard production neck in the Gibson USA building was on the basic "non Joan Jett" Melody Maker. 

          But having played lots of 1950's and 1960's Gibsons, I can tell you, back then each  Gibson from specific years had a very particular "vibe" - the 1964 Firebird, had an extremely resonant tone, and bright from the all Mahogany Neck thru construction, and massive Neck = massive tone.

          While the 1962 SGs' had just the opposite - - a too slender neck prone to going out of tune if you grabbed it too hard below the 5th fret. no Bigsby required - just have a listen to the shimmering chords as a result of on stage antics -  Typical exemplified by Pete Townsend on "the Who Live at leeds.

          But my point was that when I was working that week at Massman Ave - it was like all the guitars had been run through a "common denominator" machine, and like a big cookie cutter -sure you can order any body style you like, but for the most part - they all have a Common Neck profile =, which feels a bit like a 1962 SG standard.  I suppose there's nothing wrong with that, but for my taste - I was disappointed.  I  much prefer a 1956 LP Junior. If you Ever get a chance to play "the real deal"  - its worth a drive. The typical pro Player in 1953 was used to playing a 1940's jazz box - a Stromberg, or  D'Angelicoo, or ES150 "charlie Christian." - Find a vintage guitar shop - and if they will not let you play a vintage guitar, at least see if they will let you judge the neck geometry and wrap your hands around one of those fat neck tone machines.   

          I asked the engineers why all the Gibson USA guitars have a common slim 1962 neck profile, an they said because of market research by Guitar Center. They are Gibson's biggest customer, and based on market research they told Gibson  - "no more fat necks on the regular production run guitars - leave those for the Custom Shop".

          bummer.

          So instead - back in 2009 I bought this Epiphone, Classic US Goldtop and have a 50's Neck Profile and great tone.

           

          ====

          The review above was written in 2009 - and in the past 4 years, it appears Gibson has expanded thicker neck offerings to the regular production line. IMHO The Neck contributes a lot to a guitar's tone, and I'm happy my new 2013 Gibson SG 50's Tribute has a beefy neck I enjoy playing.   

           

          http://www.harmonycentral.com/t5/Electric-Guitars/2013-Gibson-SG-50-s-Tribute-with-Min-Etune/m-p/36237313#M4216917 

           

          Attached Files


      Working...
      X