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  • Arpeggios - Charts & Exercises

    It may take a minute to load this page. All these charts are gif images of materials I created for my students. Feel free to download and print.

    Have Fun!!!

    Brett

    _____________________________

    Gray Circles = All notes in the key.
    Black Circles= Notes In Arpeggio.
    Numbers= Scale Tone Numbers.

    Notice that there is one arpeggio for each chord in the scale. If the lowest tone of the arpeggio is 3, then that represents the III chord of the key.





    _____________________________

    Gray Circles = All notes in the key.
    Black Circles= Notes In Scale Position.
    Squares= Notes in Arpeggios that lie over the scale.
    Numbers= Scale Tone Numbers.




    And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years. - Abraham Lincoln


    MySite - MyTube - MySpace

  • #2









    And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years. - Abraham Lincoln


    MySite - MyTube - MySpace

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    • #3
      Very nice. I've done similiar charts for my students.

      In getting them to "visualize" the fretboard I charted out intervals and suggested drills so they can "see" the distance needed to go, lets say to the minor or major 3rd from any note or string, including skipping strings and playing the octave of that note.

      Once they know the chord chemistry, stacking the intervals comes easy.

      The most common difficulty students seem to have is seeing the notes on the fretboard. Once I explain the intervals and how it's based on 4ths from the 6th to 1st string (except the b string) the light bulb goes on

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      • #4
        thanks, this is perfect
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        • #5
          Brett,

          even though I have these layouts 'per position' it is nice to have them laid out in a linear fashion along the fretboard.

          many thanks

          Russ T

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          • #6
            Funky,
            I posted this same question in Jimmy James' arpeggio thread, but I'd like to ask you as well. In my limited theory knowledge, I believed an arpeggio was when you fingered the chord, then played each individual string from the sixth to the first and back. I am obviously missing something here. I have saved all your diagrams on my hard drive, in the hopes that someday they will make more sense to me. Could you give a beginers description of arpeggios for some of us slower folks? Thanks.
            RIP Ironmonger







            Originally Posted by lawboy


            The day you find an Axl Rose song on my iPod will be the day pigs fly and Republicans tell the truth.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Cat
              Very nice. I've done similiar charts for my students.

              In getting them to "visualize" the fretboard I charted out intervals and suggested drills so they can "see" the distance needed to go, lets say to the minor or major 3rd from any note or string, including skipping strings and playing the octave of that note.

              Once they know the chord chemistry, stacking the intervals comes easy.

              The most common difficulty students seem to have is seeing the notes on the fretboard. Once I explain the intervals and how it's based on 4ths from the 6th to 1st string (except the b string) the light bulb goes on


              I agree with everything you've said here and use the exact same techniques. It's great to see that light bulb. Happened just earlier today.
              And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years. - Abraham Lincoln


              MySite - MyTube - MySpace

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by 335clone
                Funky,
                I posted this same question in Jimmy James' arpeggio thread, but I'd like to ask you as well. In my limited theory knowledge, I believed an arpeggio was when you fingered the chord, then played each individual string from the sixth to the first and back. I am obviously missing something here. I have saved all your diagrams on my hard drive, in the hopes that someday they will make more sense to me. Could you give a beginers description of arpeggios for some of us slower folks? Thanks.


                An arpeggio is simply playing the notes of the [chord] it does not really have to be in order or in a common chord fingering.

                Picking each note of a chord is an arpeggio, but mostly arpewggios are used more in soloing, playing the notes closer to eachother in the scale. like in C, youd be playing C E ang G notes for a C major arpeggio. And this would sound good obviously over a C chord, or a D# [since C is 3 half steps below d# making it the minor of D#].

                If you notice, a lot of fingertappin is done in arpeggios. Examples are the main tapping in eruption and Mr Big's Green tinted 60;s mind intro.
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by 335clone
                  Funky,
                  I posted this same question in Jimmy James' arpeggio thread, but I'd like to ask you as well. In my limited theory knowledge, I believed an arpeggio was when you fingered the chord, then played each individual string from the sixth to the first and back. I am obviously missing something here. I have saved all your diagrams on my hard drive, in the hopes that someday they will make more sense to me. Could you give a beginers description of arpeggios for some of us slower folks? Thanks.


                  Arpeggio: The notes of a chord played in successsion to one another, rather than simultainously. A broken chord.

                  Arpeggio - A term used to describe the pitches of a chord as they are sung or played one after the other, rather than simultaneously.

                  These are a few definitions I've pulled from guitar web sites. Hope this helps.
                  And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years. - Abraham Lincoln


                  MySite - MyTube - MySpace

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks, guys. Got the definition down. Now how the hell do you turn something so simple into something that sounds so complex?
                    RIP Ironmonger







                    Originally Posted by lawboy


                    The day you find an Axl Rose song on my iPod will be the day pigs fly and Republicans tell the truth.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 335clone
                      Thanks, guys. Got the definition down. Now how the hell do you turn something so simple into something that sounds so complex?


                      That's a nice piece of work from Funky. He's shown one of the most important parts of good playing. Try this for your practice sessions.....work on each arpeggio one octave at a time. It breaks it up into more manageable pieces, and at the same time, you learn where those thirds, fifths, and sevenths are on the fretboard. Set your METRONOME for a slow, easy tempo, and play from the root up to it's octave and down twice, hold the root for four beats, then start from the third, up to it's octave and down (to the third) twice, hold the third for four beats, then from the fifth up to it's octave etc . When you reach the highest available note in the position, just reverse the sequence, and don't forget to include the notes that are below the root note you started on. Take a short rest, then move on to the next arp. Work on the major, major seventh, dom seventh, minor seventh, minor seven flat five, and diminished. It's a lot of work to do, so I recommend working on only one position a day, alternating positions each day until you can play them a little faster and a lot more comfortably. In time, with some patience and persistence, they won't be such a mystery. Once you have learned them, play them all every day as part of your warm up routine.
                      You play guitar with your ears; your fingers just do the work.

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                      • #12
                        very nice!!! thanks for taking the time and effort!!!
                        " he wept from his six eyes, and down three chins the tears ran mixed with bloody froth and pus. in every mouth he worked a broken sinner between his rake-like teeth. thus he kept three in eternal pain at his eternal dinner. "

                        - the inferno

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                        • #13
                          Could we see those charts again please? I am trying to learn all my arpeggio's...thank you....
                          "The story of life is quicker than the wink of an eye,
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                          Until we meet again." --- Jimi Hendrix

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                          • #14
                            All I see are red x's. Could someone put these charts up again? Thanks.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by stevehollx


                              An arpeggio is simply playing the notes of the [chord] it does not really have to be in order or in a common chord fingering.


                              Huh, I had a piano teacher who insisted that that was NOT an arpeggio.

                              An arpeggio, he insisted, had to, "cross the octave boundary". If it didn't it was a "broken chord".

                              BTW, the pictures are missing!!??!!

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