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Best Backing Tracks?

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  • Best Backing Tracks?

    Hey everybody,

    I'm trying to work out a firmer practice schedule and get in more soloing practice. Anybody have any reccomendations for cheap, quality backing tracks? I'm mostly into rock and blues, and I'd like a variety of keys. Thanks guys.
    My Gear:
    1995 Epiphone SG
    2002 MIM Strat
    2008 Squier Affinity Tele
    2009 Epiphone Les Paul Ultra (Car crash tested)
    1979 Harmony Flying V
    2006 Epiphone Korina Explorer
    2006 Squier '51
    Yamaha F-310 Acoustic
    Crate V50
    Digitech RP255

  • #2
    Hey I'm new here but I saw your post and I think I can help you.

    I recently bought a Blues backing track CD from a guy on eBay and it has helped me a great deal so I thought I would pass it on to you.

    Right now he only has one CD for sale but he does sell them often and the price is pretty reasonable at about $7.99 plus shipping costs.

    Here is the link for you and hope its what you are looking for.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/Blues-jam-tracks-guitar-play-along-CD-backing-tracks_W0QQitemZ120075936487QQihZ002QQcategoryZ417 80QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

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    • #3
      may not be "the best" but if you do a jazz thing you will get a lot out of these.

      http://www.jimmybruno.com/midi.htm

      Comment


      • #4
        The best backing track you'll ever have are the ones you make yourself. The equipment doesn't matter. If all you have to record on is a regular tape recorder (God, that's old now, right?) that's just fine. I have a Boss Loop Station and I use it to make throw away backing tracks to try things out.

        I've tried all other kinds of backing tracks, this is by far the best way becasue you're not wasting one second, you're playing music all the time.
        Terje Larsson

        inbox is full, send e-mail instead

        Hey, wanna look at my comics? Come here then http://terjelarssonserier.blogspot.com/

        Ah, sorry, it's all in swedish, but you can always look!

        You can also check out my crazy friend Dan's crazy website where he'll teach you to master the guitar in 8 minutes (or days... or whatever).

        http://spytunes.co.uk/

        Comment


        • #5
          The best backing track you'll ever have are the ones you make yourself. The equipment doesn't matter. If all you have to record on is a regular tape recorder (God, that's old now, right?) that's just fine. I have a Boss Loop Station and I use it to make throw away backing tracks to try things out.

          I've tried all other kinds of backing tracks, this is by far the best way becasue you're not wasting one second, you're playing music all the time.


          Now this is some great advice!
          " Music Is the space between the notes "

          Comment


          • #6
            guitarbt.com

            Comment


            • #7
              The best backing track you'll ever have are the ones you make yourself. The equipment doesn't matter. If all you have to record on is a regular tape recorder (God, that's old now, right?) that's just fine. I have a Boss Loop Station and I use it to make throw away backing tracks to try things out.

              I've tried all other kinds of backing tracks, this is by far the best way becasue you're not wasting one second, you're playing music all the time.


              This is great advice; and I suppose I was just too lazy to realize it in the first place. I suppose this gives me even more reason to finally plunk down some money for a USB connector (or to have my mom bring down my tape recorder). One question though: any way to improve the impedence connecting straight to a recorder? Or should I mic the amp instead?
              My Gear:
              1995 Epiphone SG
              2002 MIM Strat
              2008 Squier Affinity Tele
              2009 Epiphone Les Paul Ultra (Car crash tested)
              1979 Harmony Flying V
              2006 Epiphone Korina Explorer
              2006 Squier '51
              Yamaha F-310 Acoustic
              Crate V50
              Digitech RP255

              Comment


              • #8
                This is great advice; and I suppose I was just too lazy to realize it in the first place. I suppose this gives me even more reason to finally plunk down some money for a USB connector (or to have my mom bring down my tape recorder). One question though: any way to improve the impedence connecting straight to a recorder? Or should I mic the amp instead?


                Not sure what you mean by impedence in recording? For a cheap usb recording interface: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Behringer-UCONTROL-UCA202-USBAudio-Interface?sku=702540.
                Also, you can mic your amp if you have a mic. For better recordings you are going to want a preamp; so to stay simple just use what you already have and deal with it! I have made decent backing tracks using just the microphone from my headset and an acoustic; but I also have recording knowledge, so I know how to get the levels correct.

                Go with something easy, and make up a nice little chord progression; try starting here for chord progressions: http://www.chordmaps.com/part3.htm

                Comment


                • #9
                  The best backing track you'll ever have are the ones you make yourself.


                  I agree to a certain degree. Musicians Institute had a Workshop Series, which included sheet music for all the instruments in particular songs. I have the blues edition which has 10 blues songs.
                  I learned a lot by looking at the parts, programming the drums, playing the bass, some keyboard, harmonica, and guitar. I even started to record sax and trumpet with a GR-33. But it is very time consuming.

                  While I enjoyed the experience, in some cases it

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Yeah, making your own tracks is great--and you can sample MINE at the link below.

                    For blues tracks, I still give props to this cat named Wayne Riker, a guitarist who puts out blues materials with Alfred Publishing. His Urban Blues Stand Alone Tracks are way cool, patterned after a variety of blues styles, not just the generic shuffles we first learn.
                    www.keith-moore.net
                    All things guitar: Blog, jam tracks,
                    articles, lessons, stuff!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I've used the Aebersold series a lot. I still use them now and then for quick reference. I've tried other backing tracks too. Some come with books that give you lots of good ideas. I've used BIAB to write my own backing tracks and have the computer play it for me.

                      It's all good.

                      But, and I really think it can't be stressed strongly enough, making your own is so much better. You really learn the song. As a guitarist you'll also learn the thing you're most likely to be asked to do, comp. Also, many of the best ideas to base a solo on comes from the rhythm part.

                      Making your own also makes it easy if you think "Hey, how would this tune sound if I played it like this?" and then you just do it. The only thing that sometimes is easier in a notation program is to change it to another key, but if you know the guitar well enough, and if you keep doing this you will, it's not a problem for you to transpose.

                      Example: I have St. Thomas on an Aebersold record. The rhythm section sounds pretty close to the original recording, I like that. I jam with this track now and then. But recently I thought about how it would be for me to solo on this tune if it was really slow. So, I just recorded one chorus, made a loop, and tried it. It was eye-opening!
                      Terje Larsson

                      inbox is full, send e-mail instead

                      Hey, wanna look at my comics? Come here then http://terjelarssonserier.blogspot.com/

                      Ah, sorry, it's all in swedish, but you can always look!

                      You can also check out my crazy friend Dan's crazy website where he'll teach you to master the guitar in 8 minutes (or days... or whatever).

                      http://spytunes.co.uk/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hi -

                        A guitar mag published in the UK named "Guitar Techniques" has some excellent BT on the accompanying CD (not cheap midi cops), plus many different topics related to guitar. The mag can be obtained at Borders and other stores stateside. I live in PA and we carry it locally. I think the mag costs about 10 bucks but you get some really great instruction plus the additional CD.

                        Hope this helps,

                        Geno
                        Enjoy the moments 'cause they rip by way too fast . . .

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I do agree that making your own backing tracks is a good idea. However, sometimes you want to focus on practicing other things. I have two discs with backing tracks. Jam Tracks has 41 backing tracks in a variety of styles. The tracks are arranged by the scale/mode used. If you use it on your PC you will have access to software that displays the scale patterns that fit with each track. The discs also work as audio CD's.
                          Jam Tracks 41 backing tracks arranged by scale type that can be used with interactive software or as an audio CD.
                          Jam Tracks Exotica Learn and play 10 exotic scales.
                          www.UnderTheGroove.com

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                          • #14
                            http://guitarchaos.com/index.php?act=SR&f=98
                            _____________________________________________
                            Not to be taken seriously most of the time.

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                            • #15
                              Hey everybody,

                              I'm trying to work out a firmer practice schedule and get in more soloing practice. Anybody have any recommendations for cheap, quality backing tracks? I'm mostly into rock and blues, and I'd like a variety of keys. Thanks guys.


                              Some great advice by others to be sure. You can check out my backing tracks in the interim while you figure out whether you want to make your own, or buy BT's already done for you. The link is in my signature.

                              Have fun!

                              Lawrie
                              Mr. Lawrie Mann: Toronto, Canada
                              My Gear

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