Harmony Central Forums
Announcement
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Chord based soloing

Collapse



X
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Chord based soloing

    I've been using this lately and it gives you a different approach.

    Been doing it for a couple weeks now over jazz tunes and I'm getting some new lines from it. Can only play slowly so far but it sounds nice in a chord melody type way. Real purty. You need to think of several things at the same time.

    I'm kind of meshing drop 2 chords, full jazz chords and underlying major scale notes and melody.

    I have always admired guitarists who can seamlessly combine chords, melody, and improvisation while playing like Kenny Burrell or Joe Pass.

    _____________________________________________
    Serious about playing but not much else.

  • #2
    Jazz?? that's some scary ****************.
    Originally Posted by Jimmy James


    You're the British SAS of Metal.









    Originally Posted by Phlat Phive


    You're a man of refined taste and strong opinions.









    Originally Posted by goodusername



    Mosiddiqi is a prick, btw.



    Some Tunes:

    http://www.box.net/shared/zbo8hrncu2
    http://www.box.net/shared/dnlnkn3g44
    http://www.box.net/shared/th4tv5noyi

    Comment


    • #3
      Nigel Tufnel: "Jazz is when you play all the wrong notes on purpose."
      Thinking too much produces exactly the opposite of the intended outcome.

      Comment


      • #4
        Damn, re-read my post and had some typos there. Oops! Fixed them hopefully.

        Remember, Mos (Jon already knows this) when you play jazz you are allowed to make all kinds of musical typos and as long as you wear a cool hat and have a serious expression it's all good.

        But you can't make typos when writing. If you do Sister Winifred will hit you over the head with a three sided ruler. Ouch!

        But I am so disheartened by the lack of serious responses to my deeply sincere post. The hell with it. I quit. I will never play my guitar again and will now take up the harmonica.
        _____________________________________________
        Serious about playing but not much else.

        Comment


        • #5
          Knopfler is the DADDY when it comes to this stuff. Check out the Sultans of Swing solo, that's got some awesome chordal playing in it.
          LEARN TO MASTER THE BLUES - CLICK HERE

          Comment


          • #6
            The master of this approach, of course, was Charlie Christian. If Knopfler is the Daddy, then CC was the great grandaddy. :-) Have you guys read through this resource? http://www.music-open-source.com/source/Charlie-Christian-guitar-method-eBook/fichier/%28ebook%29%20Charlie%20Christian%20-%20Legend%20of%20the%20Jaz%20Guitar.pdf

            I use chord-shape soloing from time to time, and what I like about it is that it gives you intervals in your playing that you wouldn't typically use when basing your solo off of arpeggios or scale/scale fragments. Drop-2 shapes seem to work real well; because they are 4-note constructs, you can use any of a host of rhythmic motives to play those 4 notes and end strongly on a chord tone. Drop-3s also work, but I find that they are a bit too spread out for my taste.

            Comment


            • #7
              I do this a lot, but in blues rather than jazz. I'm not yet up to the mental task of (for example) coughing up an Eb11-5 chord in position 6 within the time allowed by 16th note triads...

              But I'm starting to get fairly proficient at finding 7th & 9th chord inversions of any key in any position in that manner, which works well for blues.

              Comment


              • #8
                I do this a lot, but in blues rather than jazz. I'm not yet up to the mental task of (for example) coughing up an Eb11-5 chord in position 6 within the time allowed by 16th note triads...

                But I'm starting to get fairly proficient at finding 7th & 9th chord inversions of any key in any position in that manner, which works well for blues.


                That's pretty much all you need. The chord forms I use are simple, and unless the chart I'm playing on has a lot of specific chord alterations called out, I just simplify to one of {maj7, dom7, min7, min7b5, dim7} and use that shape. After I "state" the tonality with that shape, I just let my ear guide my fingers to other tones, with the aim of nicely connecting to the next chord.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Great replies, guys. Thanks!
                  _____________________________________________
                  Serious about playing but not much else.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I think I
                    "Me and a book is a party. Me and a book and a cup of coffee is an orgy."
                    - Robert Fripp

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I wasn't quite sure what you meant to start with by "chord-based soloing". I thought at first you meant chord-melody style (like Joe Pass), playing 2 or more notes at the same time.
                      But now I'm guessing (from FatJeff's reply at least) that we're talking about basing your single-note lines off chords - chord tones and arps.

                      If so, I've always done this right from the beginning and considered it a no-brainer (no offence, virg! ). I never played "scales"; I'd begin by learning the chord progression (these would really simple in the early days of course!), and maybe the melody, and just work with that stuff: embellishing the chord tones with a few passing notes that sounded OK.
                      Typically I'd end up with what I later found - many years later! - was the major pent of the root (or minor pent if it was a minor chord), plus some bluesy chromatic approach notes - because that was what I heard people on records doing. (People like Chuck Berry, that is, not any of those fancy jazz dudes I'd never heard of back then. First jazz player I copied was Django Reinhardt, and whaddya know, he was doing the same thing.)

                      It wasn't hard, and it sounded right. Scales? Theory? Who needs that s***?
                      ...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Jon,

                        Chord based soloing is like this:

                        http://www.scribd.com/doc/387675/chord-based-solo

                        FatJeff's Christian site is about this too. Very cool site.

                        All these methods ultimately comeback to the same thing which is playing some combination of the 12 notes available in a melodically pleasing fashion. It's just a different mental approach to navigating.
                        _____________________________________________
                        Serious about playing but not much else.

                        Comment


                        • #13

                          What kind of a hat would be best suited for playing jazz?
                          Here's a fashion expert modelling a few options:
                          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RkHNkxzZp4k&feature=related
                          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hIkmNNmAnAM&feature=relmfu
                          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6EyotKt10pc (and a few more here in some passing photos)
                          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MI1tW-YykWQ
                          #4 gets my vote.

                          The beard is an optional extra.
                          ...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Dizzy has the style...

                            _____________________________________________
                            Serious about playing but not much else.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Chord based soloing is like this:

                              http://www.scribd.com/doc/387675/chord-based-solo
                              Yes, that looks pretty much as I understand it. More advanced than I was doing when I was copping from Chuck, of course but pretty much the way I play now (and have done for some time now): embellishing chords, playing occasional double or triple stops, and adding passing notes.
                              Looks quite comforting to see the way I naturally play (after a few decades growing into it) plotted out neatly like that, as if it's a "method"!

                              Damn, if only I'd copyrighted it....
                              ...

                              Comment









                              Working...
                              X