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How to hold a pick (plectrum) and what size to use?

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  • How to hold a pick (plectrum) and what size to use?

    Hey guys,



    Before we start reading music and playing we're going to take a quick look at the world of picks, a brief video on what picks to start with and how to progress with different sizes,



    http://youtu.be/GkfbRZLSHOs



    What size picks do you use and what brand?

    I'm a 1.8mm gel planet waves user, love em,



    Pat
    www.youtube.com/patdavidmusic free worldwide music tuition program,
    this week's video's - buying your first guitar and learning about guitar set ups m/

  • #2
    I'm using Dunlop Tortex jazzIIIs:







    and



    my website - free licks - some of my musicmy new EP 'Sonic Sketches' is out now (instrumental progressive Metal)

    Comment


    • #3
      Dunlop Delrin 2.0mm



      Originally Posted by Jimmy James


      You're the British SAS of Metal.









      Originally Posted by Phlat Phive


      You're a man of refined taste and strong opinions.









      Originally Posted by goodusername



      Mosiddiqi is a prick, btw.



      Some Tunes:

      http://www.box.net/shared/zbo8hrncu2
      http://www.box.net/shared/dnlnkn3g44
      http://www.box.net/shared/th4tv5noyi

      Comment


      • #4






        Quote Originally Posted by PatrickDavid
        View Post

        Hey guys,



        Before we start reading music and playing we're going to take a quick look at the world of picks, a brief video on what picks to start with and how to progress with different sizes,



        http://youtu.be/GkfbRZLSHOs




        Nice video. I particularly agree with starting with thin ones, for the reasons given, although I'm not sure I'd recommend as low as .30 or .40.

        IMO, 0.60 is fine for beginner strumming: bendy enough to give when striking the strings (won't break or bounce out of your hand), strong enough to get a reasonable tone and volume if you want it.

        (Of course, the best advice is buy a variety at the beginning, and try them all out.)



        As for going thicker, I think a lot depends on the string gauge you use. Of course, there's personal preference about feel, but a good rule of thumb is the heavier the strings, the heavier the pick.

        So I disagree that 0.90/1.00 is a good all-rounder, but then that's because I use fairly light strings (11s on acoustic, 10s on electric). The heaviest I go is .88, and often use .73 (Jim Dunlop in both cases).

        But for standard 12s on acoustic, 73 would feel too light to me, at least for single-string lead playing, and probably for strumming if I needed any appreciable volume.



        In fact, for any lead playing, heavier picks tend to work better IMO. The lack of give means that fine, fast movements are easier to control, transmitted better to the strings. But I couldn't strum with anything as heavy as a 1.00 (let alone more) - on my strings - without sounding crudely aggressive, or without risking dropping them (by holding them too loosely, afraid of breaking strings). Obviously that could be fixed with practice - - but I much prefer the bendier picks, where you can stiffen them with your grip when you need to, but otherwise they give more subtle dynamic variations more readily.



        Because my playing (on electric or acoustic) combines rhythm and lead, I never use anything heavier than 1.00. I do like the feel and tone of thicker picks for lead, but I find them unusable for rhythm, at least my style of playing.
        ...

        Comment


        • #5
          Dunlop Jazz III, the red ones, or Paul Gilbert picks. Held like this:



          Comment


          • #6




            Clayton Acetal 1.52

            The acetal polymer stays grippy - even wet, takes to grip modulation without issue, has the roundest attack of any pick I've tried, long wearing and, the 1.52 dimension defies physics by equaling many 2.0 picks.
            Originally posted by Unconfigured Static HTML Widget...




            Write Something...

            Comment


            • #7
              I enjoy dabbling with all sorts but I'm only really comfortable with these 1.14s



              tl;dr

              Comment


              • #8






                Quote Originally Posted by JonR
                View Post

                Nice video. I particularly agree with starting with thin ones, for the reasons given, although I'm not sure I'd recommend as low as .30 or .40.

                IMO, 0.60 is fine for beginner strumming: bendy enough to give when striking the strings (won't break or bounce out of your hand), strong enough to get a reasonable tone and volume if you want it.

                (Of course, the best advice is buy a variety at the beginning, and try them all out.)



                As for going thicker, I think a lot depends on the string gauge you use. Of course, there's personal preference about feel, but a good rule of thumb is the heavier the strings, the heavier the pick.

                So I disagree that 0.90/1.00 is a good all-rounder, but then that's because I use fairly light strings (11s on acoustic, 10s on electric). The heaviest I go is .88, and often use .73 (Jim Dunlop in both cases).

                But for standard 12s on acoustic, 73 would feel too light to me, at least for single-string lead playing, and probably for strumming if I needed any appreciable volume.



                In fact, for any lead playing, heavier picks tend to work better IMO. The lack of give means that fine, fast movements are easier to control, transmitted better to the strings. But I couldn't strum with anything as heavy as a 1.00 (let alone more) - on my strings - without sounding crudely aggressive, or without risking dropping them (by holding them too loosely, afraid of breaking strings). Obviously that could be fixed with practice - - but I much prefer the bendier picks, where you can stiffen them with your grip when you need to, but otherwise they give more subtle dynamic variations more readily.



                Because my playing (on electric or acoustic) combines rhythm and lead, I never use anything heavier than 1.00. I do like the feel and tone of thicker picks for lead, but I find them unusable for rhythm, at least my style of playing.




                Thanks for taking the time to respond jon,

                Especially regarding the use of thicker gauge strings,



                I really feel that 1mm is a good all rounder simply because to me there's still give enough but it also has enough strength,

                however! this is my recommendation coming from predominately an electric guitar player, as you said, someone playing lighter strings could prefer the alternative, or not!



                I love forums and learning how completely different every musician is, you prefer a less aggressive attack, but that's the tone i like from my pick.

                So many little things can be fixed in practice I remember when i was first starting out i just to sand paper my picks so they had more grip haha



                not saying this is at all bad practice i was just focusing on the wrong thing.



                I've been using for a little while now a mixture of planet waves clear gel like picks, can't seem to find a link sorry (kind of clear black colour - they're in the video),



                and planet waves cortex 1.25mm



                www.youtube.com/patdavidmusic free worldwide music tuition program,
                this week's video's - buying your first guitar and learning about guitar set ups m/

                Comment


                • #9






                  Quote Originally Posted by Yngtchie Blacksteen
                  View Post

                  Dunlop Jazz III, the red ones, or Paul Gilbert picks. Held like this:







                  Do you, by any chance, strap your guitar higher than you used to?
                  I used to be "with it", then they changed what "it" was.
                  Now, what I'm with isn't "it", and what's "it" seems weird and scary to me.
                  (Abe Simpson)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I agree with starting out on thinner picks. As time goes by then increase the thickness of the pick. Also as your playing style develops over time, you probably end up finding which picks suits you best. Gibson pure M picks seem to be what I've been playing with recently.
                    "Any man who thinks he can be happy and prosperous by letting the government take care of him better take a look at the American Indian" — Henry Ford

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Pic size is interesting. I took lessons for a guitar legend, and he advocating for heavier pics, going so far as to say that no guitarist of any significance plays with a medium or thin pic. Then on the other end of it, my favorite guitarist, who also happens to be a good friend, plays with a thin pic and sound better than darn near anybody. Conclusion: use what feels comfortable, but try a bunch of different ones first.
                      Become a better lead guitarist, bass player or drummer by jamming along with music from Best Backing Tracks. http://www.bestbackingtracks.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I use the exact same pick as Mr. Beck,



                        nada

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                        • #13
                          Im a likely exception to this thread. I have used Dunlop nylon 46mm for a long time. When I started out I used really thick picks(those big Gibson triangles) but I destroyed them and the strings. I couldnt hold a fender standard for more then a couple mins before dropping it. The 46 nylons do form to my grip and they stiffen when they bend. I also hold them at about a 80-75 degree angle to the strings.

                          Comment


                          • #14






                            Quote Originally Posted by The Burninator
                            View Post

                            Do you, by any chance, strap your guitar higher than you used to?




                            Not at all. It's always been so high that there should be little difference in my hand positions when I'm sitting or when I'm standing.

                            Comment



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