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  • linear jazz improvisation

    a while ago I posted a query to see if anyone had used this stuff. took a jump and have been playing around with a couple of Ed Byrne's books for a few weeks now - I have to say, I really like his approach of not caring about scales and chords.

    I bought the method book and the songbook for blue monk. it's a pretty neat way to play - you do the exercises, sing them, mix and match them, play them all over the neck.

    anyway, it's not easy - i have lots of trouble focusing on it and can really only practice it for about 30-45 minutes - BUT it sinks in my head and i can usually hear all the exercises later in the day if I get some quiet time at work.

    it's good stuff and worth a look if anyone's sick of running scales over chords. mostly for jazz/blues, but i guess you could apply it to anything.

    http://www.byrnejazz.com/

    he's got a pile of free jazz stuff up here too:

    http://www.freejazzinstitute.org/showposts.php?dept=lji

    musica delenit bestiam feram

  • #2
    Ed's the man. You can hit him up at allaboutjazz.com forum's. There's a lot of guitarists over that have used to book and even have done reviews of the book from a guitarists point of view. This might give you even more insight into the depth of the book. (Ed is a trombonist with cred to die for)
    PM me about Online One-on-One Guitar Lessons, via Skype and Paypal
    http://lessons.mikedodge.com
    http://www.mikedodge.com
    http://forum.mikedodge.com

    Hint for online instructors...play the example in it's entirety, THEN talk about it for 5 minutes.

    The only good liberal is a...well, we're still trying to figure out the answer to that one.

    Uma is a motorik.

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    • #3
      Sounds like a really interesting book. If I wasn't unemployed I may be tempted to buy it.

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      • #4
        I plan to get Ed Byrne's book after I finish learning all the etudes in the Jazz Guitar Etudes book.

        Byrne is a HUGE proponent of etudes, especially those you write for yourself.

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        • #5
          I plan to get Ed Byrne's book after I finish learning all the etudes in the Jazz Guitar Etudes book.

          Byrne is a HUGE proponent of etudes, especially those you write for yourself.


          That Jazz Guitar Etudes book looks killer too. It's one I've been meaning to get.
          PM me about Online One-on-One Guitar Lessons, via Skype and Paypal
          http://lessons.mikedodge.com
          http://www.mikedodge.com
          http://forum.mikedodge.com

          Hint for online instructors...play the example in it's entirety, THEN talk about it for 5 minutes.

          The only good liberal is a...well, we're still trying to figure out the answer to that one.

          Uma is a motorik.

          Comment


          • #6
            Who is the Jazz Guitar Etudes book written by?

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            • #7
              the functional jazz guitar one?

              ed did that one too. I've got a copy, but honestly I find the songbook to be the most useful - although the jazz guitar one has some great ideas for comping.
              musica delenit bestiam feram

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              • #8
                Who is the Jazz Guitar Etudes book written by?


                I don't remember. Look it up on youtube though there's some great promo vids for it
                PM me about Online One-on-One Guitar Lessons, via Skype and Paypal
                http://lessons.mikedodge.com
                http://www.mikedodge.com
                http://forum.mikedodge.com

                Hint for online instructors...play the example in it's entirety, THEN talk about it for 5 minutes.

                The only good liberal is a...well, we're still trying to figure out the answer to that one.

                Uma is a motorik.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Who is the Jazz Guitar Etudes book written by?


                  Greg Fishman and Mike Allemana

                  http://www.gregfishmanjazzstudios.com/jazzguitaretudes.html

                  Greg Fishman is the sax player who originally wrote the etudes. Mike Allemana is the guitarist who wrote the tab. Mike added a note in the book that essentially says "you can use the tab to get started, but if you want to get the most value out of the book, memorize the etude then experiment with your own fingerings".

                  I first heard about this book during a thread on how to phrase more like a horn player. I think Byrne, who obviously is also a horn player, was also mentioned on that thread.

                  I've been practicing these two etudes regularly (demonstrated by other guys below):

                  ">" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="425" height="350">

                  ">" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="425" height="350">

                  What I have gotten so far out of it, besides technical improvement (esp. being more comfortable switching hand positions more smoothly), are ideas on how to use augmented triads in realistic solos, and of course general ideas for creating more interesting solos over blues and bossa nova (several bossa tunes share the same changes as "Take The A Train"). Before learning these etudes, I understood the theory and the sound of augmented triads but was unable to apply them to real music.

                  I just started learning this "rhythm changes" type etude, even though it will take me at least twice as long to get up to the tempo of 264 bpm (8th notes):

                  ">" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="425" height="350">

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                  • #10
                    have any of you guys worked through this? it seems like exactly the way i'd like to approach my lead improvisation without sounding scale-y.

                    A Melodic Approach to Jazz Improvisation

                    whoa, maaaaaan.

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                    • #11
                      have any of you guys worked through this? it seems like exactly the way i'd like to approach my lead improvisation without sounding scale-y.

                      A Melodic Approach to Jazz Improvisation



                      Since you are in Chicago, I would suggest looking up Mike Allemana (mentioned earlier in this thread) and scheduling some time with him instead. Allemana and Greg Fishman are both based in Chicago. He would probably show you similar material, but you'd learn it faster because of the "human teacher advantage".

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                      • #12
                        have any of you guys worked through this? it seems like exactly the way i'd like to approach my lead improvisation without sounding scale-y.

                        A Melodic Approach to Jazz Improvisation



                        this book sucks. i had garrison as a teacher before. he is a piece of ****************. all he does is talk about his house in paris and how he's friends with so many jazz greats. he teaches nothing

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                        • Funkifized
                          Funkifized commented
                          Editing a comment

                          Too bad you weren't good enough to get anything out of Garrison's teaching. I took a Standard Tune Workshop with him, and it changed my whole outlook on guitar playing. My reading sucked at that time, and I got tons of great stuff from Garrison; he was humble enough deal with us newbies, but pushed us with the right amount of gusto to get some mileage out of us. I've also dealt with Garrison enough in recent times to realize that he's particularly helpful that he would help anyone out with explanation and detail on how to use his method books. If you're not getting out of his teaching, it's on you, dude. 

                          This book is absolutely the best; advanced enough to be useful for all levels of guitarist, but straight ahead enough to be understood by the novice. I use this method with my students to great success. Let me know when you've made enough playing jazz guitar to afford a house in Italy (not Paris, you're misremembering that). He was also good enough to study with Pat Martino and with Lenny Breau. Those two would eat you alive. 


                      • #13
                        LOL... Yeah, Garrison Fewell is a pompous dude, from my recollection.. I never took from him at Berklee, but he is a fine jazz guitarist. Nothing OUT OF CONTROL, but a skilled guy, nontheless. His book is ok. But then again, I think most books are pretty good, especially for beginners... or intermediate players.. If you apply knowledge and EXTRAPOLATE as much as you can from one idea in any book, you can discover tons of stuff YOURSELF....
                        Danny AKA Professor Parkinson

                        www.myspace.com/dannyhayounakaprofessorparkinson www.youtube.com/meganutt7

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                        • #14
                          hahaha thanks for the input guys, but that all sounds personal. i read some things saying that the methods in that book will unlock a lot of improv freedom for you
                          whoa, maaaaaan.

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                          • #15
                            hahaha thanks for the input guys, but that all sounds personal. i read some things saying that the methods in that book will unlock a lot of improv freedom for you


                            I have nothing against Fewell myself, but I've seen more enthusiasm for Byrne's books than anything by Fewell. This thread was originally about an Ed Byrne book after all:



                            Notice that guys like Mike Dodge (gennation) give Byrne huge props. Check out the All About Jazz forums and see for yourself what kind of respect he commands there.

                            But if I were you I'd try a teacher in Chicago. The right teacher will unlock your improv freedom faster than any book. A great jazz city like that should have plenty of teacher options for you.

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