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  • #16
    Let's try this again. Since my rhythm playing isn't necessarily an issue, (it can be better, but my lead is my worry right now), I used a different track that I just did leads over. I hit a few wrong notes, but the battery in my recorder died after this take so it's all I have. I tried to implement more melody, but my fingers really seem to have a mind of their own and kind of fly. I think I am more in tune with the music though. Some more input?



    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=...type=3&theater

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    • #17
      Two chord jam. Takes a very good guitarist to fly one of those for anything more than a few bars. What you're doing might be good practice and discovery but there isn't much to critique as a solo or melody.

      As far as the practice, two chord vamps make good templates to test the fit of rhythms and whatever licks and chops you got. I'd go easy on the cliche guitar flurries though and favor train of thought, and proportion to the time scale ie. 1 or 2 minutes, 5 minutes; whatever. Some kind of musical statement/journey/event/add your own criteria, should develop and thusly transpire.
      Originally posted by Unconfigured Static HTML Widget...







      Write Something, or Drag and Drop Images Here...

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      • #18






        Quote Originally Posted by Uh_Me
        View Post

        Let's try this again. Since my rhythm playing isn't necessarily an issue, (it can be better, but my lead is my worry right now), I used a different track that I just did leads over. I hit a few wrong notes, but the battery in my recorder died after this take so it's all I have. I tried to implement more melody, but my fingers really seem to have a mind of their own and kind of fly. I think I am more in tune with the music though. Some more input?



        http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=...type=3&theater




        You say your rhythm playing isn't an issue, but your timing is the main thing that's wrong there. It's what really marks you out as an amateur.

        The note choices and phrasing are mostly good - apart from a tendency to go for either long notes or very fast ones, with little in between. But if the timing was solid, that wouldn't be an issue; it would sound near professional. Your tone and feel are good, IMO.



        There's definitely an improvement over the earlier example - but timing is still where you need the most work. (It's improved a little along with everything else, but not enough.)



        Do some real basic work - maybe on a more medium tempo track - placing notes right on the beat (quarters), then 8ths - splitting the beat exactly in half - then 16ths; again making sure the beat is in exact quarters, and that you still get notes on the beat where they should be. IOW, don't play too many 8ths or 16ths until those quarter notes are absolutely solid.



        Try not to let your fingers fly away! That can be a good thing once you have a solid grounding in timing/rhythm, and once you understand the scale's relationship to chord tones (that's generally fine here, but there's only two chords and little chance of going wrong). But right now you need to control every note, make sure it's in the right place (relative to the beat).
        ...

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        • #19






          Quote Originally Posted by JonR
          View Post

          You say your rhythm playing isn't an issue, but your timing is the main thing that's wrong there. It's what really marks you out as an amateur.

          The note choices and phrasing are mostly good - apart from a tendency to go for either long notes or very fast ones, with little in between. But if the timing was solid, that wouldn't be an issue; it would sound near professional. Your tone and feel are good, IMO.



          There's definitely an improvement over the earlier example - but timing is still where you need the most work. (It's improved a little along with everything else, but not enough.)



          Do some real basic work - maybe on a more medium tempo track - placing notes right on the beat (quarters), then 8ths - splitting the beat exactly in half - then 16ths; again making sure the beat is in exact quarters, and that you still get notes on the beat where they should be. IOW, don't play too many 8ths or 16ths until those quarter notes are absolutely solid.



          Try not to let your fingers fly away! That can be a good thing once you have a solid grounding in timing/rhythm, and once you understand the scale's relationship to chord tones (that's generally fine here, but there's only two chords and little chance of going wrong). But right now you need to control every note, make sure it's in the right place (relative to the beat).




          Is there any places in specifically that are slipping out of time? Aside from the unintentional pick slip, I'm having trouble picking many spots where that is a real issue in this one.

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          • #20
            For only playing one year, I'd say you are doing extremely well.
            Become a better lead guitarist, bass player or drummer by jamming along with music from Best Backing Tracks. http://www.bestbackingtracks.com

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