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  • Lukather Blues Lesson

    I've been on a bit of a Steve Lukather kick lately, and I thought this was a cool little lesson.  A lot of folks can't seem to get out of "the box" and more stock-sounding blues licks and he gives a lot of examples of how to make it more interesting.

    Multiple award winning blues/rock/country at http://www.zeyerband.com or http://www.reverbnation.com/zeyer.Check my solo (instrumental rock) projects at: http://www.reverbnation.com/vincedickinson"Music is like the English language - it's just full of rules that need to be broken or you aren't hip.""It doesn't take talent to upgrade your playing. It takes patience" - Kenny Werner

  • #2

    I just listened to your song "time flies", cool song and nice singing and guitar playing too!

    "Any man who thinks he can be happy and prosperous by letting the government take care of him better take a look at the American Indian" — Henry Ford

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    • BydoEmpire
      BydoEmpire commented
      Editing a comment

      guitarville wrote:

      I just listened to your song "time flies", cool song and nice singing and guitar playing too!


      Thanks, man, much appreciated!


  • #3

    Like.

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    • #4

      Great vid.

      Yeah the trick to a more sophisticated blues sound is to treat each chord change as a key change. So, in A, A minor pentatonic over the ONE chord, D Mixolydian over the IV and E minor pentatonic over the V. This is probably the most common 'advanced' blues sort of approach. 

      Of course there is a lot more options than just those.

      A cool approach he touches on here is all the chord moves we already know. So if you slide down a semi-tone (or up) into a change - you can use the exact same ideas when soloing. Whatever works for the chords - works for the solo lines.

      a BIG step for me was coming to understand this. Lead playing and rhythm playing are one and the same.

      Blog: sixstringobsession
      Subscribe to my YouTube channel

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      • Yer Dad
        Yer Dad commented
        Editing a comment

        He goes through things quickly, without much explanation. I wish there was some notation, or even tab for it.


    • #5
      Great little vid with some nice licks.

      Some of the explanation here is cut out...basically he's talking about pretending there's an Eb9 chord right before the D7. Tritone substitution...

      An easy way to cut down on the amount of thinking involved is to do the Emily Remler approach and play Jazz Minor off the 5th of the non-diatonic 7 chord. So for Eb9 you play Bb jazz minor. Or the lydian dominant or the overtone scale or whatever you wanna call it. Or you think of it like chord tones like Luke does here. Or you play whatever and use your ears to resolve to chord tones

      Personally, I think the easiest way to start hearing this stuff is to steal the licks here and tweak them. IMO the key to making this sound good is to do like Luke and only play the funky colors for a few beats and then land on the chord tones like a boss.

      Good stuff!
      musica delenit bestiam feram

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      • #6

        very cool!

         

        Thanks for posting this.

        Whenever I try to emphasize the individual chords in a regular blues (ie NOT a jazz-blues) I always have a hard time making it sound good and natural, I always end up sounding like an exercise trying to force-emhpasize the chord changes.

        It's very inspirting to see a clip like this!

        my website - free licks - some of my music

        I offer online guitar lessons on Skype in different styles. Send me a PM if interested.

        check out my EP 'Sonic Sketches'

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        • jeremy_green
          jeremy_green commented
          Editing a comment

          Santuzzo wrote:

          very cool!

           

          Thanks for posting this.

          Whenever I try to emphasize the individual chords in a regular blues (ie NOT a jazz-blues) I always have a hard time making it sound good and natural, I always end up sounding like an exercise trying to force-emhpasize the chord changes.

          It's very inspirting to see a clip like this!


          That's how it starts Lars.. in the early stages it's that way for everyone. But like anything, the more the sound gets in your ears the less "thinking" goes on - which leaves room now for the ideas to come through.


      • #7

        BydoEmpire wrote:

        I've been on a bit of a Steve Lukather kick lately, and I thought this was a cool little lesson.  A lot of folks can't seem to get out of "the box" and more stock-sounding blues licks and he gives a lot of examples of how to make it more interesting.


         

         

        I liked it.

        Hard to call this a lesson. I'm not really seeing exactly what he is doing. I assume he is playing pentatonics and flattening the 3d & 5th, sometimes augmenting the 3d and 5th.

        Years ago he saw him on tour with Larry Carlton. Impressive but could have been much better.

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        • 1001gear
          1001gear commented
          Editing a comment

          VagueSubscription wrote:

          BydoEmpire wrote:

          I've been on a bit of a Steve Lukather kick lately, and I thought this was a cool little lesson.  A lot of folks can't seem to get out of "the box" and more stock-sounding blues licks and he gives a lot of examples of how to make it more interesting.


           

           

          I liked it.

          Hard to call this a lesson. I'm not really seeing exactly what he is doing. I assume he is playing pentatonics and flattening the 3d & 5th, sometimes augmenting the 3d and 5th.

          Years ago he saw him on tour with Larry Carlton. Impressive but could have been much better.


          He always struck me as Studio Rock's answer to Lee Ritenour. Ready to punch in but not exactly on target. Sounds like he's aging gracefully though.













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