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  • Replacing a reverb tank

    Well it's been bloody ages since I posted anything on HC....

    My trusty old Laney TF320 has decided - 2 weeks before I go on tour - that the reverb no longer works. Brilliant!

    I've had a look at it, all the connections seem to be in order. The signal seems to be going through the reverb tank but I'm not getting any reverb from it. I even tried replacing the cable connecting it to the amphead but no joy.

    I've seen reverb tanks going cheap on ebay, can I replace mine with any old unit?
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  • #2
    Reverb tanks have a numbering system that tells you what they are and what the replacement would have to be. This link will explain what you need to know. https://www.amplifiedparts.com/tech-...specifications
    Last edited by Axisplayer; 07-30-2017, 05:08 PM. Reason: EDIT: Yours may not be this brand, but each brand has a similar system and if you know the brand, the labeling will tell you what you need to replace it.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Dougy View Post
      . . . I've seen reverb tanks going cheap on ebay, can I replace mine with any old unit?
      No. You need a new tank that matches the specs for your old one. Your old tank should have a series of numbers like 4BB3C1D. For that matter, the tank may not even be the issue but if it is you need the right tank.
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      • #4
        Tanks are relatively cheap, but if your amp's reverb is driven by [part of] one of the pre-amp tubes, it could be the pre-amp tube...or if you have the footswitch, that could be the problem as well. I'm not familiar enough with the Laney Fusion line to tell you much more [witout a schematic], but I would check those possibilities first.
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        • #5
          Tanks are incredibly simple and easy to troubleshoot. They consist of no more then two electromagnets that surround the ends of the reverb spring. One acts as a speaker to make the spring vibrate and one acts like a microphone to pick the sound up at the other end.

          You can easily measure the input and output connectors with an ohm meter. (might be good to get those readings because they can help you select a new tank if its bad) You should read between 8 to several thousand ohms at either jack. If it reads open then you should check the inside wiring for breaks between the connector and elements.

          The small wires from the transmitter and receiver elements are soldered to the inside of the jack. This is where most tanks fail. (The spring tank is suspended by shock absorber springs and allowed to float so the wires going to the elements connectors get flexed when the amp gets transported and the wires eventually fray and break). All they need is to be re-soldered and the tank should work fine.

          If the tank took a serious blow and damaged an element or broke a spring, then it likely needs replacement

          Most reverb tanks cost less than $25 new. The issue buying one is they have widely varying impedances from 8 ohm all the way up to thousands of ohms. The lower impedances are used in Tube amps and the higher in solid state amps. (in most cases)

          You also have 2, 3, 4, 5 spring models and the spring length/tank sizes vary.

          You need to get the right tank so your reverb tone, length of decay depth match the circuit and physical size of the tank mounts in the amp.
          The number on the reverb tank is key to finding a crossover replacement out of maybe a hundred different types from a couple of different vendors.

          If you don't have that number finding the right tank cant be difficult. I bought a tank for a tank-less Peavey amp. To the best of my knowledge I thought I bought the right one but the reverb wound up sounding so deep I suspect the info I dug up wasn't accurate. It would have been much better If I had the right number.

          MOD and Accutronics are the two big sellers of tanks. Both sell in the same ranges and have similar quality. I think Accutronics sells more OEM tanks but MOD are Just as well made.
          Last edited by WRGKMC; 07-31-2017, 07:00 AM.

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          • #6
            Does your amplifier have separate Reverb Level controls for the Clean and Drive channels?


            I would suggest opening the amplifier and reseating the ribbon cable connectors.


            Last edited by onelife; 07-31-2017, 12:37 PM.
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            • #7
              Originally posted by Dougy View Post

              I've seen reverb tanks going cheap on ebay, can I replace mine with any old unit?
              Short answer? No.

              But here's an article about amp reverb (including info on deciphering tank codes as well as some troubleshooting tips) that you may find helpful... let me know if you have any questions.


              http://www.harmonycentral.com/articl...-of-amp-reverb
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              • #8
                PS If your Laney's reverb is tube-driven (and uses a tube for the recovery stage) the problem could be in the tube and not in the tank. I'd try a different / known-good tube first before replacing the tank if that is indeed the case.

                PPS. Good to see you Dougy - don't be a stranger!
                **********

                "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."

                - George Carlin

                "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."

                - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

                "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."

                - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

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