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16 ohm speaker into an a 8 ohm output, ok?

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  • 16 ohm speaker into an a 8 ohm output, ok?

    Just nailed a pretty solid deal on a Mesa nomad 55 1x12 combo. I already have a nice worn in vintage 30 rated at 16 ohms 60 watts I'd like to put in this amp. The Mesa has one 8 ohm out and 2x 4 ohms outs. I can run my speaker from the 8 ohm out right? I know this isn't really a prob with solid state amps but is it the same for tube amps? Will I lose any power if I do? I Think it might be ok but I just wanna make sure.
    -"Who is John Galt?"-

  • #2
    As always fellas I really appreciate the help. Say what you will about the v30, it's a great speaker and is the only thing that made my valve king bearable. I'm pretty excited about my Mesa, as it's definitely the nicest amp I've ever owned, can't wait to get it. I hate to see my v30 go but I was already looking into a scumback just in case the impedence was gonna be an issue. Though maybe I'll take a look at those warehouse guitar speakers or whatever theyre called. I have heard good things about them. Soooo anyone interested in a peavey valveking 1x12 with a Celestion v30??!! Heh heh.
    -"Who is John Galt?"-

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    • WittyMonikerHere
      WittyMonikerHere commented
      Editing a comment

      Hold on, I have a related question: I currently have a 2x12 8 ohm mono cab that has two 16 ohm Eminence Wizards wired in paralell. I wanted to swap out the speakers and retain the 8 ohm output to maximize compatability, so I was told getting two V30s @ 16 ohms would do the trick. This info accurate?

      Thanks!


  • #3

    Tube amps use an output transformer to filter DC voltage (from the tube's bias circuit) from the AC waveform (the amplified audio signal), and to match the output impedance to the load impedance.

    The output transformer has taps at different locations on the output coil to match the output impedance to different load impedances, depending on which tap you use. When the impdances are matched, most of the amplifier's power is being transferred to the speakers and there's very little (negligible) energy being dissipated by the transformer. When the output impedances do not match, the transformer isn't transferring all of the energy to the speakers and must dissipate the energy somehow... usually as HEAT.

    If the load impedance is too low, there is much more current flowing on the output side of the transformer, this can damage the transformer and/or the speakers. If the load impedance is too high, there is much more current flowing on the amplifier side of the transformer, which can damage the transformer or the amplifier itself.

    Keep in mind that the difference between 4 ohms and 8 ohms is a factor of 2. The difference between 4 ohms and 16 ohms is a factor of 4. If you have a 4 ohm load connected to the 8 ohm tap, there's twice the current flowing on the output side. If you have a 4 ohm load connected to the 16 ohm tap, there's four times the current flowing. That extra current isn't flowing to the speakers either, it's building up in the transformer and turning into heat... which will eventually damage it.

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