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My strat has three neck pickups...

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  • My strat has three neck pickups...

    I also posted this in the Guitars forum.

    I got it this way, it's used. What I don't understand, is why would anyone
    do this? The pickups are Seymour Duncan Classic Stack. The model
    number is 12TK1 (or something) followed by the letter "N" on all three. I
    did a little digging and I see the neck and middle both have the "N", but I
    don't know why anyone would want a neck pickup in all three positions.
    The guitar sounds great, and I'm going to leave it this way for now. Does
    anyone do this, or have heard of doing this?

  • #2
    You need one of those three neck heart shaped guitars like Vai has!

    U
    v

    Comment


    • #3
      On a stock Strat all 3 PU's are the same. The only difference is that the middle PU is reverse wound to cut switching noise.
      Bob I

      I know that there are people who do not love their fellow man, and I hate people like that!

      Comment


      • #4
        Well that makes me feel better Bob, I don't feel like I'm missing much then. There is no noise when switching, and I just love this thing. My fingers hurt, and I play purty regular...

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by bob-ingram
          On a stock Strat all 3 PU's are the same. The only difference is that the middle PU is reverse wound to cut switching noise.


          isn't that reverse-wound, reverse polarity, to cancel hum in positions 2 and 4?? Or am I learning something new (again) from BobI???

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Rob Quail


            isn't that reverse-wound, reverse polarity, to cancel hum in positions 2 and 4?? Or am I learning something new (again) from BobI???


            LOL.

            It's not reverse polarity, it's reverse wound. Someone once tried to explain the difference, I didn't understand then either.

            Fender did this reverse wound thingy even before there were 5 position switches. The switch is a "Make before break" type. If both PU's were engaged even for a second, the noise would increase and make an kinda "Fffzzzttt" type of of noise. I know, I put the middle PU in the bass side once on my 62 and had this problem when switching from bridge to middle. A tech told me what the problem was.

            I once read that Fender tried a "Break then make" switch and found it to be very noisy.
            Bob I

            I know that there are people who do not love their fellow man, and I hate people like that!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by bob-ingram


              It's not reverse polarity, it's reverse wound. Someone once tried to explain the difference, I didn't understand then either.



              Actually Bob, the magnetic poles ARE reversed. This allows for the "humbucking effect" to be used. Just like in a standard humbucker that uses opposite poles of a single bar magnet, the RW/RP uses the south pole of one set of magnets facing up and the north poles on the second pickup facing up. Since the windings are reversed also, this puts the signal from both pickups back in phase. Of course, it only works on those "in between" positions on a Strat...which many folks mistakenly believe are "out of phase".

              And Steverino....don't feel too bad; I have two left feet and ten thumbs
              Dave
              Wendler Instruments

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by dave251


                Actually Bob, the magnetic poles ARE reversed. This allows for the "humbucking effect" to be used. Just like in a standard humbucker that uses opposite poles of a single bar magnet, the RW/RP uses the south pole of one set of magnets facing up and the north poles on the second pickup facing up. Since the windings are reversed also, this puts the signal from both pickups back in phase. Of course, it only works on those "in between" positions on a Strat...which many folks mistakenly believe are "out of phase".

                And Steverino....don't feel too bad; I have two left feet and ten thumbs


                Thanks, Dave...now delete your three latest posts.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by dave251


                  Actually Bob, the magnetic poles ARE reversed. This allows for the "humbucking effect" to be used. Just like in a standard humbucker that uses opposite poles of a single bar magnet, the RW/RP uses the south pole of one set of magnets facing up and the north poles on the second pickup facing up. Since the windings are reversed also, this puts the signal from both pickups back in phase. Of course, it only works on those "in between" positions on a Strat...which many folks mistakenly believe are "out of phase".


                  That's what I thought.

                  This is how the pairs on a 'bucker work, too; the adjacent pups are RW/RP, yes??

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Rob Quail


                    That's what I thought.

                    This is how the pairs on a 'bucker work, too; the adjacent pups are RW/RP, yes??


                    Coils, yes.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Ove


                      Coils, yes.


                      No, pickups. A pickup is a coil and a magnet. A "guitar pickup" is a set of six pickups (or twelve in a 'bucker) The coil is RW and the magnet is RP. A coil can't be both.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Pickups 101-

                        The two most popular styles of magnetic string pickups....

                        The single coil, ala Fender, uses six alnico slugs as their own polepieces. These all have their magnetic poles oriented in the same direction, ie, north pole up for the two "outside" pickups in a Strat, and south pole up for the interior pickup. These are surrounded by a coil of wire, typically #42 or #43 AWG insulated wire(VERY thin insulation...the vintage stuff used an enamel, the modern wire uses a "copolymer") There will be a couple thousand feet of wire on the typical guitar pickup. As an example of our Strat, the outside coils are wound clockwise, the interior coil, counterclockwise.

                        With me so far?

                        The GIbson style, or "humbucker" has ONE magnet oriented flat, centered under the coils. Each coil's SET of polepieces, whether screw or slug, will come into contact with either the north OR south pole of the magnet. This focuses the magnetic field into the plane of the strings. The coils are wound clockwise for one, and counter clockwise for the other, and connected in series.

                        We will assume, for the sake of illustration only, that electricity will flow in one direction. Now, if you move the string, a corresponding signal will result in the coils as a reaction from the influence of the magnetic fields(both north and south). IF just the coils are wound opposing, then the signals would be of equal strength and opposite each other, and would cancel out...no signal!! BUT, since the magnet(s) are of opposing polarity, the current in each coil will flow in the SAME direction, and when summed(series) will give an output. However, since the coils are wound opposing, and act as little radio antennas, any radio frequency interference will be cancelled out since radio waves are not highly influenced by the magnetic field. Hum goes away....

                        Now, on a modern Strat, when the selector is in the #2 and #4 positions, and the coils are wound RW/RP, you will have a hum cancelling effect, somewhat reduced because there is a distance between the two coils, and RFI arrives at the coils a bit out of sync. However, since the pickups are in PARALLEL, the output is reduced vs. a humbucker, which is typically wired in series.

                        One further comment on humbuckers...as the magnet's field is oriented horizontally, and a much greater distance from the string, magnetic field damping is reduced when compared to the single coil, which will typically have the magnet VERY close to the string, exascerbating said damping effect, and causing a loss of sustain. One of the reasons guitars equipped with humbuckers are thought to have great sustain.

                        Of course, we haven't touched on soapbar pickups, which are a different geometry altogether.
                        Dave
                        Wendler Instruments

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by dave251


                          Actually Bob, the magnetic poles ARE reversed. This allows for the "humbucking effect" to be used. Just like in a standard humbucker that uses opposite poles of a single bar magnet, the RW/RP uses the south pole of one set of magnets facing up and the north poles on the second pickup facing up. Since the windings are reversed also, this puts the signal from both pickups back in phase. Of course, it only works on those "in between" positions on a Strat...which many folks mistakenly believe are "out of phase".

                          And Steverino....don't feel too bad; I have two left feet and ten thumbs




                          Whooppie, I understand. Reverse winding and reverse polarity.

                          And they say 2 wrongs don't make a right.
                          Bob I

                          I know that there are people who do not love their fellow man, and I hate people like that!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Rob Quail


                            No, pickups. A pickup is a coil and a magnet. A "guitar pickup" is a set of six pickups (or twelve in a 'bucker) The coil is RW and the magnet is RP. A coil can't be both.




                            This is how the pairs on a 'bucker work, too; the adjacent pups are RW/RP, yes??


                            Yes, one coil is RW, but there

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Well, I replaced those SDs with some Fender Texas Specials. I'm happy with them, although I think it's a little muddier than it was. I'll probably tweak the pickup heights and see if that helps....

                              Comment



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