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  • Off Topic: Lasic Surgery

    I did it. I had my eyeballs fried.

    I went from seeing 20/1000 to 20.20. It's absolutely amazing. It's also a major pain in the ass because I only see 20/20 outdoors. Indoors I now need reading glasses, which I didn't need before. I'm constantly forgetting to bring them to places like restaurants, and need people to read menus or similar things to me. This is because of my age (57) and the natural deterioration of near vision that occurs to all of us as we get older.

    Still, when I'm outdoors, looking at things that are far away, it's a miracle. I ride a bicycle for 2 hours every day for exercise, and looking at the scenery and really seeing it for the first time in my life is an unimaginable pleasure. I recently saw a sunset for the first time the way God intended us to see it, and it was so intense I nearly fell off the bike.

    Before the surgery I could see with my coke bottle glasses well enough function, but the glasses distorted things in way I never noticed, and I had no peripheral vision outside the frame.

    The surgery itself is painless, but really unpleasant. They don't cut into you eyeballs, they burn away parts of them with a laser beam. You can't feel it, but you can smell it, and it's really gross and disgusting, and the knowledge that you're smelling your eyeballs burning is to say the least, disconcerting. Fortunately it only takes a minute or two.

    Do I recommend it for younger people? Absolutely. Would I do it again myself if I knew beforehand what I know now? I truly don't know. I love it when I'm out on my bike. I hate it when I'm indoors and don't have my reading glasses handy.

    I'd be happy to discuss this further with anybody who wishes to E-mail me about it.
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  • #2
    Originally posted by Stringman
    I recently saw a sunset for the first time the way God intended us to see it, and it was so intense I nearly fell off the bike.


    You really need to stop falling off your bike Mike

    Sorry, couldn't resist.

    I have glasses myself. I've thought of surgery of the kind you describe but then again I've heard some bad things too so I've stuck with my glasses. They make me look smarter I think
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    • #3
      Thanks for the information. I'm near-sighted and wear glasses. The thought of fried eyeballs is making me keep my glasses for now! My vision is improving as I get older so maybe I will have a glass free period before I get my reading glasses.



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      • #4
        I had a Lazer procedure done on one eye a year ago.It was to halt the growth of a cyst on the back of my eyeball.No ill effects to report here,real simple, quick, and only a little discomfort.
        <div class="signaturecontainer"><b><i><font color="SlateGray">HCGB trooper #187</font></i></b><br />
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        • #5
          I got lasik a couple of years ago. It was fine- I had to get a retouch on one eye 3 months later, but all went well.

          Right now I'm 20-20 in my rght eye, something like 20-30 in the left. Which is actually not a bad thing- the weaker left eye allows me to be able to read most things without reading glasses. (I only need the glasses if the light is dim or if I'm really tired).

          My distance vision is really good. I could get a retouch on the weak eye and it would be perfect; but then I'd porobably need the reading glasses all the time, so until they come up with a permanant procedure for presbyopia, I think I'll leave well enough alone...
          <div class="signaturecontainer">... there's more guitar content and less annonymous cowards grinding their axes ...</div>

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          • #6
            Wow, I am actually interested in this. So just a few questions if I may.

            Whats the cost?

            Are you awake during the surgery?

            The way you describe it is I can't see far away, but have excellent vision up close. Will the procedure reverse this(meaning I will see great far away, but require glasses for reading)?

            How long is the procedure?

            Do they give you an accuracy percent?

            If you need a touch up is that more?

            Does insurance normally cover the costs?

            Thanks.
            <div class="signaturecontainer"> !Caution!<br />
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            • #7
              nice to hear this little story. i'm blind as a bat and would love to do it. my sister had it done and is thrilled to death! she says it's a miracle. i've only known a few horror stories and lots of success stories.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Stringman
                I did it. I had my eyeballs fried.

                I went from seeing 20/1000 to 20.20. It's absolutely amazing. It's also a major pain in the ass because I only see 20/20 outdoors. Indoors I now need reading glasses, which I didn't need before. I'm constantly forgetting to bring them to places like restaurants, and need people to read menus or similar things to me. This is because of my age (57) and the natural deterioration of near vision that occurs to all of us as we get older.


                Well Hell, I'm interested. I have the same prob. When I was younger, I had great vision. As I hit 40, I had to use reading glasses, but my long didtance sight was OK. In the last couple years (I just hit the big 50), my long distance has seriously degraded.

                I am OK with reading glasses & have gotten used o carrying them around (I do keep extra pairs stashed in the car & at work in case I have a senior moment). But the distance thing is really buggin me & I hate Bi/ Tri focals (the infocus area is just too small).

                I was worried that if I had my long distance vision corrected, I'd need microscpes to read or watch TV. BTW hows the night vision, any "starring"
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                • #9
                  I've been undecided about having this done. I would love to have the far vision, but I'm 42 and I don't know if I can readjust. I've been legally blind since birth. I'm lucky to have a real job. I don't know if I want to take the chance of winding up with something I can't live with. My job requires up close work, and my vision is good for that for sure, I can read the date on a penny with no problem. I have severe astigmatism, and I'm not sure there's any cure for this, I know corrective lenses help, but don't cure it. I've never seen stars at night, that would be cool.

                  Maybe I'll wait till I retire, but then, if it's a vast improvement...it's a tough call.

                  Stringman, let us know how it goes and how you're adjusting to wearing glasses for up close stuff. That's the part that has me nervous. Sure, you can drive without glasses now, but watch out for the stairs!

                  steve

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Nate_D
                    Wow, I am actually interested in this. So just a few questions if I may.

                    Whats the cost?

                    $1,500 total, 2 years ago. (It's probably come down)

                    Are you awake during the surgery?

                    Yes. They anesthetize your eyeball, so you don't feel much. You lay back in the chair; look up at a red light; they place a suction device on the eyeball to hold it steady; the suction actually causes you to lose vision momentarily; they slice the flap and peel it back. When they release the suction, you can see again, but it's all blurry (because you don't have a functioning lens). They tell you to keep your focus on the red light (which actually appears to be a red blob) while they use the laser. When they're done, they put the flap back, smooth it out with a little squeegee, and move on to the next eye. Total time- maybe 1 1/2 minute per eye for the actual procedure; total time in the chair, 5-10 minutes.

                    Then you sit in a darkened room for about 15 minutes, and they send you on your way. (It's best to get someone to drive you).

                    If you have a compassionate doctor, you'll get valium prior to the procedure, Tylenol III or the equivalent for when you go home. But I had very little pain- didn't need to take anything.

                    It takes a few weeks for everything to settle back down, but this is a minor effect.

                    The way you describe it is I can't see far away, but have excellent vision up close. Will the procedure reverse this(meaning I will see great far away, but require glasses for reading)?

                    Maybe- depends on your age.

                    How long is the procedure?

                    See above

                    Do they give you an accuracy percent?

                    Yes. Talk to the doctor.

                    If you need a touch up is that more?

                    No- included in the total cost. (My personal belief is, the first time, they tend to take off less rather than more- most everyone I know had to get a retouch. Which makes sense- they can always take off a little more, but they can't replace tissue if they take off too much).

                    Does insurance normally cover the costs? Not when I did it.

                    Thanks.
                    <div class="signaturecontainer">... there's more guitar content and less annonymous cowards grinding their axes ...</div>

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                    • #11
                      Good info!

                      Here's something I found that might be of interest:

                      http://www.fda.gov/cdrh/lasik/

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Steverino6
                        I've been undecided about having this done. I would love to have the far vision, but I'm 42 and I don't know if I can readjust. I've been legally blind since birth. I'm lucky to have a real job. I don't know if I want to take the chance of winding up with something I can't live with. My job requires up close work, and my vision is good for that for sure, I can read the date on a penny with no problem. I have severe astigmatism, and I'm not sure there's any cure for this, I know corrective lenses help, but don't cure it. I've never seen stars at night, that would be cool.

                        Maybe I'll wait till I retire, but then, if it's a vast improvement...it's a tough call.

                        Stringman, let us know how it goes and how you're adjusting to wearing glasses for up close stuff. That's the part that has me nervous. Sure, you can drive without glasses now, but watch out for the stairs!

                        steve


                        My experience with the near-vision thing: it really only affects reading. Anything froma 2 or 3 feet away from your face is fine. In other words, you don't have to worry about falling down the stairs or running into things.

                        When I got it done, I was facing the prospect of wearing bifocals. Which, I've heard, is a pain in the ass to adjust to. I feel like I'm much better off after the lasik. The few times I need the reading glasses, it's pretty easy to deal with.
                        <div class="signaturecontainer">... there's more guitar content and less annonymous cowards grinding their axes ...</div>

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                        • #13
                          the stories about permenant nighttime halos turns me off to this however this is supposed to be an even newer procedure that
                          reduces this effect.

                          I also love that I can see things close up by taking off my glasses to read , having to put reading glasses on just for some reason bugs me.

                          Has last vision checkup 2 weeks ago, sight is failing a bit since Im diabetic doc said almost legally blind

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by TeleCastrMaster


                            My experience with the near-vision thing: it really only affects reading. Anything froma 2 or 3 feet away from your face is fine. In other words, you don't have to worry about falling down the stairs or running into things.

                            When I got it done, I was facing the prospect of wearing bifocals. Which, I've heard, is a pain in the ass to adjust to. I feel like I'm much better off after the lasik. The few times I need the reading glasses, it's pretty easy to deal with.


                            Well, I'm already using bifocals, that wouldn't be a problem, although they're not cheap. (transition lenses) I'd be more likely to go for it if I knew they could take care of the astigmatism, and no insurance won't cover it, it's considered cosmetic surgery because the surgery doesen't improve your vision any better than corrective lenses will (or so they say).

                            Xprmntl, I'm not diabetic, but I also take off my glasses to read, everyone says that's bassackward, but I'm corfortalbe with it.

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                            • #15
                              One thing though, I can play without looking at the fretboard

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