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  • The state of music...

    So I was pondering my musical existence in a buzzed haze last night and, while listening to some Zeppelin, and SRV...I realized that, in general I find myself extremely dissatisfied with the current musical climate in the industry.

    It seems that bands are so short lived now that you don't really get the longevity that the old greats had. Decades of music and whatnot. It seems like most bands nowadays don't last more than a year or so. They get that one hit single and fade to black. What do you think is the contributing factor to this?

    Also, the amount of expertise that's on exhibit seems limited in the mainstream music scene. I understand that in some of the more extreme Genre's like Jazz and Metal there are those guitarists and artists that are experts in their respective crafts...But they're on the fringe. The number of guitarist/singer/keyboard/drummers that have really honed their craft to perfection seems almost very small when compared to the greats of yesteryear...the Claptons, Pages, Vaughans, Santanas etc...etc...(I know they're still around) NEW greats don't seem to be born anymore...is this because of the band longevity issue I was talking about?

    Another point that I find interesting is an idea that I got out of Clapton's autobiography (which is a FANTASTIC book if you're a fan) where he states that he thinks that music industry is in for a huge change within the next 5-8 years or so. With the openness of the internet and places like Myspace where musicians can post their music and get recognized without the help of a major label, he theorizes that those labels will start to disappear.

    Any thoughts on how the music industry will change in the next decade or so? Will it be a good thing? Will the industry be flooded with garbage? Does a band just shoot for that one hit single and that's that? And is there any room for a great band (soloist) anymore in today's FAST industry.

    Thoughts, concerns?

  • #2
    So I was pondering my musical existence in a buzzed haze last night and, while listening to some Zeppelin, and SRV...I realized that, in general I find myself extremely dissatisfied with the current musical climate in the industry.

    It seems that bands are so short lived now that you don't really get the longevity that the old greats had. Decades of music and whatnot. It seems like most bands nowadays don't last more than a year or so. They get that one hit single and fade to black. What do you think is the contributing factor to this?

    Also, the amount of expertise that's on exhibit seems limited in the mainstream music scene. I understand that in some of the more extreme Genre's like Jazz and Metal there are those guitarists and artists that are experts in their respective crafts...But they're on the fringe. The number of guitarist/singer/keyboard/drummers that have really honed their craft to perfection seems almost very small when compared to the greats of yesteryear...the Claptons, Pages, Vaughans, Santanas etc...etc...(I know they're still around) NEW greats don't seem to be born anymore...is this because of the band longevity issue I was talking about?

    Another point that I find interesting is an idea that I got out of Clapton's autobiography (which is a FANTASTIC book if you're a fan) where he states that he thinks that music industry is in for a huge change within the next 5-8 years or so. With the openness of the internet and places like Myspace where musicians can post their music and get recognized without the help of a major label, he theorizes that those labels will start to disappear.

    Any thoughts on how the music industry will change in the next decade or so? Will it be a good thing? Will the industry be flooded with garbage? Does a band just shoot for that one hit single and that's that? And is there any room for a great band (soloist) anymore in today's FAST industry.

    Thoughts, concerns?

    I can't remember the last time I heard anything on the radio that has made sit up and pay attention. It's sad.
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    <img src="images/misc/quote_icon.png" alt="Quote" /> Originally Posted by <strong>tumbleweeed</strong>
    <a href="showthread.php?p=30683114#post30683114" rel="nofollow"><img class="inlineimg" src="images/buttons/viewpost-right.png" alt="View Post" /></a>
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    <div class="message">You want some more Jello, boy? Its made with Hooves!</div>

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    • #3
      I can't remember the last time I heard anything on the radio that has made sit up and pay attention. It's sad.


      What happens if you're in teh car and you're already sitting up? What then?
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      Originally Posted by <b>BlueStrat</b><br />
      <i>You, on the other hand, are like the third ex wife I never had!</i> <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/mad.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Mad" class="inlineimg" />

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      Originally posted by <b>daddymack</b><br />
      <i>After reading this thread numerous times, I am now becoming convinced that based on the life I have led so far, that I will wind up in Raleigh, NC when I die, for all eternity...</i>

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      </div>
      </div> <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/facepalm.gif" border="0" alt="" title="facepalm" class="inlineimg" /></div>

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      • #4
        What happens if you're in teh car and you're already sitting up? What then?


        I roll all reclined like...
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        <img src="images/misc/quote_icon.png" alt="Quote" /> Originally Posted by <strong>tumbleweeed</strong>
        <a href="showthread.php?p=30683114#post30683114" rel="nofollow"><img class="inlineimg" src="images/buttons/viewpost-right.png" alt="View Post" /></a>
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        <div class="message">You want some more Jello, boy? Its made with Hooves!</div>

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        Comment


        • #5
          So, the hypothesis is that popular music suckage has has steadily increased through time, with least in say mid-60's and most now? What's the shape of the curve?
          NOTE: The absence of smilies in this post should not be taken to mean that I think your post is stupid, nor that I loath, despise, or hate you; nor that I disrespect you and all your works; nor that I see you as victim or lawful prey; nor think you have the intellect of half a loaf of bread; nor that I find you disgusting or unworthy or otherwise hate your behavior, opinions, politics, gender, sexual orientation, culture, ethnic background or language.

          F*** 'em if they can't take a joke!

          Comment


          • #6
            <div class="signaturecontainer"><a href="http://www.patcoast.com" target="_blank">http://www.patcoast.com</a><br><br><br><br><font size="1">&quot;The guy would be strumming along, singing the verse to “Margarittavile” and then he would hit his harmonizer pedal for the chorus. It went from sounding like a guy singing and playing guitar to sounding like the Stephen Hawkings trio.&quot;-<i>Christhee68</i></font><br><br><br><br><font size="1">&quot; the singer of my cover band used to find it funny to let out gaseous forms of vile hate and sadness that would make a plaster baby Jesus weep.&quot;-<i> FitchFY</i></font></div>

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            • #7
              I can't remember the last time I heard anything on the radio that has made sit up and pay attention. It's sad.


              Exactly...

              I'm a youngin' so I don't remember SRV very much, but I know the first time I heard him he on the radio it was "Tin Pan Alley", and I quite literally pulled my car over just to listen to it and get the name of the song (this was a long time ago). I have only done that for a very few artists, and all of them turned out to be guys that we all know and love.

              In recent memory (I.E. in the past 15 years or so) I don't remember hearing anything and going "Holy ****************, this guy is a genious". More often it's something like "He's good, but he sounds just like ..."

              I don't know...frustrating really.

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              • #8
                Don't confuse the state of music with the state of the industry -- they are not related.
                <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot;The mics themselves couldn't give a **************** what source they're on...&quot;<br />
                - <a href="mailto:Fletcher@mercenary.com">Fletcher@merc enary.com</a></div>

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                • #9
                  We're getting old and cannot relate to the "music" that is being produced at this moment in time, pretty simple.
                  The great players, the great bands with a few exceptions are all in the past.
                  <div class="signaturecontainer">Professor Tom</div>

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                  • #10
                    There's lots of great music being made today, just as there was in the 60s, 70s and so on. Unfortunately most of it isn't what the major labels are sending to Clear Channel and Jefferson Pilot. If you want it, you have to go and look for it.

                    There are great slingers out there, too. But the Claptons, Pages, Vaughns, Santanas etc. are not only few and far between as they've always been, they're having to work harder than ever to be heard over all the crap that's on 90% of radio stations.

                    Music ain't dead, it's just walkin' with a limp.
                    <div class="signaturecontainer"><a href="http://www.taylorharveyband.com" target="_blank"><b>The Taylor Harvey Band</b></a><br />
                    <br />
                    <a href="http://www.myspace.com/taylorharveyband" target="_blank"><b>The THB myspace page</b></a><br />
                    <br />
                    <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/wave.gif" border="0" alt="" title="wave" class="inlineimg" /></div>

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                    • #11
                      There's lots of great music being made today, just as there was in the 60s, 70s and so on. Unfortunately most of it isn't what the major labels are sending to Clear Channel and Jefferson Pilot. If you want it, you have to go and look for it.
                      Exactly. Back in the day, "rock radio" was all over the place stylistically. We heard everything from Hendrix and Cream to Jim Croce and Dylan to the Supremes and Aretha. And since the distribution of music was tightly controlled, we pretty much only heard what the majors put out- some bad, but a lot of really great stuff. Many of those guys we heard in 1972 are still touring today. They sold a bazillion records under the old system.

                      Today, everyone and anyone can put a record out. Radio stations are specialized and hyper commercialized because of increased competition for shrinking audiences.

                      Every time this subject comes up I'm reminded of that job hunting commercial where the pro tennis players are having at it when all of a sudden people start pouring out of the stands with tennis rackets and forming a huge crowd of amateurs all trying to play tennis on a pro court.

                      The music biz is a lot like that today.
                      <div class="signaturecontainer"><a href="http://www.patcoast.com" target="_blank">http://www.patcoast.com</a><br><br><br><br><font size="1">&quot;The guy would be strumming along, singing the verse to “Margarittavile” and then he would hit his harmonizer pedal for the chorus. It went from sounding like a guy singing and playing guitar to sounding like the Stephen Hawkings trio.&quot;-<i>Christhee68</i></font><br><br><br><br><font size="1">&quot; the singer of my cover band used to find it funny to let out gaseous forms of vile hate and sadness that would make a plaster baby Jesus weep.&quot;-<i> FitchFY</i></font></div>

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                      • #12
                        when classical music was made there were no records. if someone wanted to hear music they hired a band to come to their living room and play. maybe they invited some friends over. 90% of the people playing guitar today would probably not be playing if they could pay $60 and have a band play in their living room.

                        the recording industry is over, there's no way to make money from selling recordings of music anymore.

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                        • #13
                          We have beaten this to death in the Music Biz Forum...there are, as BS said, so many unworthy players able to promote themselves due to the lack of the gatekeeping that the 'label' system provided, although there were always independents to a degree, they were commercially motivated. And, as THB said, there is still good music being made, but you will need to wade through all the other crap to find it...even if you want a specific genre, like blues, you need to do research...and wading.
                          The 'Music Industry', as far as the label/radio/retail cartel, is dying a slow awkward and painful death. With so much music available now via the internet, and well known bands literally offering downloads of their material for free, and a gazillion unknown bands following suit, regardless of quality, the entire value of music has been denigrated as a commodity in the market place.
                          _"We are currently experiencing some technical difficulties due to reality fluctuations. The elves are working tirelessly to patch the correct version of reality. Activities here have been temporarily disabled since the fundamentals of mathematics, physics and reason may be incomprehensible during this indeterminant period of instability. Normal service will be restored once we are certain as to what 'normal' is."

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                          • #14
                            when classical music was made there were no records. if someone wanted to hear music they hired a band to come to their living room and play. maybe they invited some friends over. 90% of the people playing guitar today would probably not be playing if they could pay $60 and have a band play in their living room.

                            the recording industry is over, there's no way to make money from selling recordings of music anymore.
                            for $60, I will come to your house and play kazoo for a half hour...if you are in the neighborhood...
                            Sadly, the legal/liability issues of modern society makes playing in a private residence a very iffy proposition for a band, or even a soloist...and $60 won't get anything anymore, except maybe a lesson.
                            _"We are currently experiencing some technical difficulties due to reality fluctuations. The elves are working tirelessly to patch the correct version of reality. Activities here have been temporarily disabled since the fundamentals of mathematics, physics and reason may be incomprehensible during this indeterminant period of instability. Normal service will be restored once we are certain as to what 'normal' is."

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                            • #15
                              I guess then my real question is...do you see any significant changes because of how the music industry is changing? Or are we doomed to exist from now on in a world full of hack musicians who get famous because they have a pretty Myspace page with their band and a few songs on it?

                              Seems to me that musicians, under the "label" construct had to work MUCH harder back when. Now anyone can get heard, and they can get heard so young. How can you honestly expect a 17 year old singer and a 16 year old guitarist to be an expert at their craft? Unless they're serious geniuses they don't have the experience yet as far as I'm concerned. But EC, SRV, EVH, Santana etc...etc...they didn't make it big until they were older. And they had to work way harder to get noticed by the labels among the riff raff. Unlike today, the riff raff can still get noticed and even make some cash.

                              What could possibly organize the CURRENT musical scene into a system where GOOD artists get recognition and the ones to are just ok don't make it? Once the labels die will there be something to replace them? Or do we just resign ourselves to mediocre music?

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