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After 10 years, I still suck on guitar - Any advice?

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  • #16
    How do you like that Senco micro-pinner?

    I hear they suck.
    http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e1...1330893693.png

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Mike Rooney
      How do you like that Senco micro-pinner?

      I hear they suck.


      I wouldn't know. Mine's a Porter Cable, as is the one in the picture, and it works great. You can side or endgrain nail 1/4" thick pieces and it won't split them.
      http://www.patcoast.com"The guy would be strumming along, singing the verse to “Margarittavile” and then he would hit his harmonizer pedal for the chorus. It went from sounding like a guy singing and playing guitar to sounding like the Stephen Hawkings trio."-Christhee68" the singer of my cover band used to find it funny to let out gaseous forms of vile hate and sadness that would make a plaster baby Jesus weep."- FitchFY

      Comment


      • #18
        No shame in being a rythym guitar player,at least you play. I've seen young players,14-17 years old that are amazing shredders,but can't play rythym to save their life. I would try to build up to what you want to do,Play some easy songs over and over till you get it perfectthen try harder songs.What kind of songs do you want to play and what style? There's all kind of styles,songs out there. Some you will need formal lessons. Myself,I'm satified to be a blues hack.
        1997 Epiphone PR-350CE
        2000 MIM Fender Stratocaster
        2001 Washburn Bantamn bass
        19?? Takamine EGS-340SC
        ???? Yamaha APX-5NA
        2004 Squier Telecaster Standard
        2006 Regal RV-38 resonator
        2000 Cedar Creek Dulcimer
        2009 Stagg mandolin
        ......and more to come!

        Comment


        • #19
          I'm working 40 hard hours a day

          Are you living in a time warp, or are you just Superman?



          Doouuugh......!

          Yes I am...........

          *******

          And I bought a POS 18 gauge pin nailer on EBay for $.99 ( The shipping was $24.00) and it has been surprizingly OK. I did a Soji screen for our bedroom and it nailed the endgrain in the crosspieces which were 5/16ths by 1/2". I use it at work for everything. We'll see how long it holds up.........
          ____________________________________
          Originally posted by gtrbass.....

          I'm such a big fan of ME that I signed myself to an exclusive 7 album deal. Of course since I'm both the artist and the label, I promised myself the world up front and then I totally screwed ME in the fine print of the contract. I'll never see sh*t as the artist, but I'm gonna make a killing as the label...._______


          www.myspace.com/strangerbytheminute

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by BlueStrat


            I wouldn't know. Mine's a Porter Cable, as is the one in the picture, and it works great. You can side or endgrain nail 1/4" thick pieces and it won't split them.


            One of my biggest pet peeves is people who misread posts, and here I misread a pic!

            All my guns are older Sencos with the exception of a Hitachi NT65 I picked up last year.
            http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e1...1330893693.png

            Comment


            • #21
              .......... 100% main reason I don't jam in band settings. I'm sort of bummed she flaked before we could really dive into theory together--now I'm on my own again.


              I do agree that taking a few lessons, maybe in a totally new style, can really help get past a slump. The first time I hit a wall with guitar, I took some folk/blues lessons from a friend for a few months. Served its purpose!


              Regarding jamming, just go for it. You will probably surprise yourself and others. I knew no theory at all until I was 21, and I'd been jamming since 16. Once you start learning theory you'll probably realise you know more than you thought, just didn't know what to call it.
              Good luck mate
              My Baby
              My Teacher
              Why you shouldn't record after drinking...
              Trooper #267 :-)

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Durwood75

                On the bright side, I think I have a natural feel for rhythm. : /


                The rhythym guitar player is vastly under rated but, in most cases, extremely necessary.

                Not everyone needs to play lead and be a frontman.
                HC Geezer Brigade #71

                "There's a little green man in my head"

                Comment


                • #23
                  Here's my advice.

                  Are you a decent student in other areas of your life? You know, where you actually study?
                  Were you able to hunker down with books and projects in college and get them done even when you didn't feel like it?

                  If your goal is to someday be a decent musician you're going to have to practice and study.

                  You don't have to devote your life to it but you need to put in several hours a week, minimal. Otherwise you will progress very slowly and there is nothing wrong with that. It just depends on what you want.

                  I think a good teacher can make all the difference in the world but you still have to do the work. You have to investigate on your own.

                  If you don't want to use a real live teacher there are all kinds of instructional resources on the webbernet.

                  I've used Visionmusic for jam tracks. They are simple but effective.

                  I've used Workshoplive for video lessons that I highly recommend as a substitute for a real live teacher. But still, you have to do the work. You can't just sit there and watch the lessons.

                  HC's Lesson Loft is full of ideas and information though it's not organized into any kind of structured instructional process.

                  Things to do:

                  1. Learn theory as you go. Don't sweat it, but try to understand it as you learn new music. It really isn't that hard. You just need to learn some fundamental concepts and everything else is just a logical extension.
                  If you were to take music theory as a college course 1 or 2 years of study would provide you with all you really need to know. You can do it on your own. Find the right book or information on the net. It's easy.

                  2. Play with other people and try to absorb their knowledge. I've had some good teachers in my history who were just friends who played.
                  Don't let NOT playing with others stifle your desire to play. There are gazzillions of ways to make music and enjoy it. Personally, I think music is at it's most satisfying when you are playing with others but I spend a great deal of time playing by myself.

                  3. Learn songs start to finish and continue to expand your repertoire of tunes that you like. Get a drum machine or backing tracks or at least a metronome. Good time is everything. When you get together with others who share your interests you will be far more useful to them if you can play full tunes in time.

                  4. Learn riffs and hooks to songs you like. You can back up most CD players just a fraction so you can hear the riff or even a single note over and over again. Some media players can be slowed down with out changing the pitch. I use a program called Transcribe!. I can slow down the fastest flurry of notes so I can hear each one individually. Transcribe! has been incredibly useful to me in learning and consequently understanding jazz riffs.
                  There are all kinds of tabbed out transcriptions available. You can learn many concepts at once by working through one

                  Knowing licks and leads etc. will give you the framework from which to improvise. If you couple your riff knowledge with your theory knowledge you will start to see order on the fretboard. This will make it easier for you to play in different keys and ultimately help you to step away from being stuck in certain box forms.

                  5. If you don't know any scales now is the time. Most guitar players start out with the pentatonic scale in the first position (your E bar chord shape). I would suggest learning the major scale and the minor scale in the same position. Then learn the theory ie. Why is it a major scale? Why is it a minor scale? How does the pentatonic minor fit into the minor scale?

                  You will discover that the riffs you learn will fit into the patterns of the scales you are learning. Don't worry about modes for now they will start to reveal themselves as you learn about scales and you'll learn them and understand them as your knowledge deepens.
                  I'm assuming you don't know any of this stuff based on your description of your abilities.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Norsegod
                    Here's my advice.

                    Are you a decent student in other areas of your life? You know, where you actually study?
                    Were you able to hunker down with books and projects in college and get them done even when you didn't feel like it?

                    If your goal is to someday be a decent musician you're going to have to practice and study.

                    You don't have to devote your life to it but you need to put in several hours a week, minimal. Otherwise you will progress very slowly and there is nothing wrong with that. It just depends on what you want.

                    I think a good teacher can make all the difference in the world but you still have to do the work. You have to investigate on your own.

                    If you don't want to use a real live teacher there are all kinds of instructional resources on the webbernet.

                    I've used Visionmusic for jam tracks. They are simple but effective.

                    I've used Workshoplive for video lessons that I highly recommend as a substitute for a real live teacher. But still, you have to do the work. You can't just sit there and watch the lessons.

                    HC's Lesson Loft is full of ideas and information though it's not organized into any kind of structured instructional process.

                    Things to do:

                    1. Learn theory as you go. Don't sweat it, but try to understand it as you learn new music. It really isn't that hard. You just need to learn some fundamental concepts and everything else is just a logical extension.
                    If you were to take music theory as a college course 1 or 2 years of study would provide you with all you really need to know. You can do it on your own. Find the right book or information on the net. It's easy.

                    2. Play with other people and try to absorb their knowledge. I've had some good teachers in my history who were just friends who played.
                    Don't let NOT playing with others stifle your desire to play. There are gazzillions of ways to make music and enjoy it. Personally, I think music is at it's most satisfying when you are playing with others but I spend a great deal of time playing by myself.

                    3. Learn songs start to finish and continue to expand your repertoire of tunes that you like. Get a drum machine or backing tracks or at least a metronome. Good time is everything. When you get together with others who share your interests you will be far more useful to them if you can play full tunes in time.

                    4. Learn riffs and hooks to songs you like. You can back up most CD players just a fraction so you can hear the riff or even a single note over and over again. Some media players can be slowed down with out changing the pitch. I use a program called Transcribe!. I can slow down the fastest flurry of notes so I can hear each one individually. Transcribe! has been incredibly useful to me in learning and consequently understanding jazz riffs.
                    There are all kinds of tabbed out transcriptions available. You can learn many concepts at once by working through one

                    Knowing licks and leads etc. will give you the framework from which to improvise. If you couple your riff knowledge with your theory knowledge you will start to see order on the fretboard. This will make it easier for you to play in different keys and ultimately help you to step away from being stuck in certain box forms.

                    5. If you don't know any scales now is the time. Most guitar players start out with the pentatonic scale in the first position (your E bar chord shape). I would suggest learning the major scale and the minor scale in the same position. Then learn the theory ie. Why is it a major scale? Why is it a minor scale? How does the pentatonic minor fit into the minor scale?

                    You will discover that the riffs you learn will fit into the patterns of the scales you are learning. Don't worry about modes for now they will start to reveal themselves as you learn about scales and you'll learn them and understand them as your knowledge deepens.
                    I'm assuming you don't know any of this stuff based on your description of your abilities.


                    Couldn't have said it better meself.
                    My Baby
                    My Teacher
                    Why you shouldn't record after drinking...
                    Trooper #267 :-)

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      By a mesa and turn the gain to 10.... nobody will know you suck.

                      John
                      John

                      Russell: What amazes me is that there is so much loser compressed into such a small space... how does it not combust into a giant ball of suck.

                      "I love to eat babies!!!!!" ~Makoshark

                      "Come to Khazakstan. We do disco dancing,
                      archery, rape and table tennis. It's niiice!"~Borat Sagdiyev



                      Obligatory Gear List:
                      Annabelle: 95 Epiphone G400.... beat to **************** and hotrodded out

                      Betty: 2004 MIM Strat, looking decent, and hotrodded out

                      Mojo: 1956 Fender Musicmaster...

                      And a yet to be named 1966 Gibson ES-335

                      2002 CE22....700 bucks... couldn't afford a name

                      FX: Marshall BB2, Morley Wah, MXR Distortion II, Ibanez TS10, Ibanez DL10, Marshall Vibratrem, Boss TU2, Pod XT, and Ibanez Soundtank Chorus/Flanger silver monstrosity


                      Amps: Seymour Duncan Convertible, Bedrock 612 Combo, 1959 Gibson Skylark, 1970's Fender Bassman 10 (currently undergoing serious revisions)

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Just be glad you were learning how to play a guitar instead of a Hammond B-3. Had you done that, you would have had to post, "After 10 years, I still suck on the organ."

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by El Glom-o
                          Just be glad you were learning how to play a guitar instead of a Hammond B-3. Had you done that, you would have had to post, "After 10 years, I still suck on the organ."


                          Post of the day...
                          "We are currently experiencing some technical difficulties due to reality fluctuations. The elves are working tirelessly to patch the correct version of reality. Activities here have been temporarily disabled since the fundamentals of mathematics, physics and reason may be incomprehensible during this indeterminent period of instability. Normal service will be restored once we are certain as to what 'normal' is."

                          Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally used up and worn out, shouting '...man, what a ride!'
                          "The greatness of a man is not in how much wealth he acquires, but in his integrity and his ability to affect those around him positively" ~Bob Marley

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by daddymack
                            Post of the day...



                            Thank you. Coming from someone in your field, I consider it to be quite complimentary.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by KATMAN
                              No shame in being a rythym guitar player,at least you play. I've seen young players,14-17 years old that are amazing shredders,but can't play rythym to save their life. I would try to build up to what you want to do,Play some easy songs over and over till you get it perfectthen try harder songs.What kind of songs do you want to play and what style? There's all kind of styles,songs out there. Some you will need formal lessons. Myself,I'm satified to be a blues hack.





                              my problem is i like rythm guitar ... but my rythm sucks

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Thanks to all for the great replies.

                                I have done well in the past when applying myself to various projects, interests or tasks. I got through college with a pretty good GPA (3.5) and a double major so I know I'm smart enough, I think I just haven't put in the time or focused enough while praticing.

                                I have actually read up on Theory some and do understand some concepts - I admit some are still over my head but I have made some progress learning the theory behind the sounds. Unfortunately, my ear has a lot of trouble hearing the actual sounds and qualities; plus, I've not applied what knowledge I have grasped to playing nearly enough.

                                Anyway, I'm going to rededicate myself and force myself to make some time in the evenings and weekend to play constructively. Playing with others would be a good thing but I think it would be asking a lot of friends who are much better than me to put up with me while I get it together. So, maybe I can find some beats or a drum machine to play against until I'm a little more confident and capable. Also, I like the idea of immersing myself in good music and then trying to play what I hear - seems like that would force me to hear what I'm playing as well as discover what works and why (theory).

                                I appreciate the minimal flaming and encouragement!

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