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what determines a high tech guitar?

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  • what determines a high tech guitar?

    I've been curious about it more now than before, hoping it can be better utilize with my BOSS SY-300 guitar synth pedal. I might be willing to sell off most of my guitars to get something "high tech". Does Guitar Center sell these types of guitars? I haven't seen any or perhaps I haven't really been looking for it. Is it something like a Strandberg?
    Earn $25 when one friend makes a purchase. They'll get $10.
    https://www.ebates.com/r/CHICHI1336?eeid=28187

  • #2
    What they mean by "high tech guitar" is usually a MIDI capable guitar that you can hook up to a keyboard rack or DAW or a guitar like the line 6 variax, which does a lot of vintage guitars by way of hardware inside the guitar. There is no "High Tech Guitar"! It is just a way of saying a guitar that is usually different from a regular guitar....it makes different sounds than a regular guitar.

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    • #3
      Good explanation. I was hoping the guitar would have AI capabilities LOL. Couldn't I just turn my guitars "high tech" by buying an add-on? I think there's a product that could turn my guitar MIDI-capable.
      Earn $25 when one friend makes a purchase. They'll get $10.
      https://www.ebates.com/r/CHICHI1336?eeid=28187

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      • #4
        High tech can man the instrument is loaded with on board electronics, or it can mean they use technical advancements in the build. Due to wood costs many manufacturers are incorporating new composite materials and things like carbon fiber.

        There isn't anything new to either of these of course. Vox was adding on board electronics over 50 years ago. Same thing with building materials. Dan Electro has made Masonite guitars for over 50 years. Plexiglas, Bakelite, Aluminum, Steel, even cardboard has been used to build guitars. Likewise, I've seen just about every kind of circuit jammed into a guitar you can think of from guitar pedals, to midi, to keyboards, drum machines, computer circuits and even amplified speakers in attempts to attract buyers.

        Not sure why but most players draw a line when it comes to having their guitar run on batteries. Mounting the pickups which are actually part of the amplifier seem to have been enough. When manufacturers go farther it always seems like it fails to sell, no matter how good or durable the electronics are. The way I see it, if the musician wanted to be a keyboard player, he's be sitting behind a keyboard hidden from view.

        A guitar is a very passionate and mobile instrument. Players don't like feeling tethered to the technology having it mounted in their instrument. On the floor where they can operate it by foot contact, fine, but control with the hands is typically too difficult and distracting when playing. Changing eye focus from the audience to your instrument to make electronic adjustments is at best clumsy. Adjusting with your feet is still the best option. Its close but a good player can maintain his upper body composure while stomping on pedals below, literally walking and chewing gum at the same time. Sacrificing notes to make adjustments beyond something as simple as a volume or pickup selector robs the artists focus from being on the audience and the audience feels neglected every time. Next time you see a really good show see if the guitarists are futzing over the electronics or are they focused on playing the notes.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by WRGKMC View Post
          High tech can man the instrument is loaded with on board electronics, or it can mean they use technical advancements in the build. Due to wood costs many manufacturers are incorporating new composite materials and things like carbon fiber.

          There isn't anything new to either of these of course. Vox was adding on board electronics over 50 years ago. Same thing with building materials. Dan Electro has made Masonite guitars for over 50 years. Plexiglas, Bakelite, Aluminum, Steel, even cardboard has been used to build guitars. Likewise, I've seen just about every kind of circuit jammed into a guitar you can think of from guitar pedals, to midi, to keyboards, drum machines, computer circuits and even amplified speakers in attempts to attract buyers.

          Not sure why but most players draw a line when it comes to having their guitar run on batteries. Mounting the pickups which are actually part of the amplifier seem to have been enough. When manufacturers go farther it always seems like it fails to sell, no matter how good or durable the electronics are. The way I see it, if the musician wanted to be a keyboard player, he's be sitting behind a keyboard hidden from view.

          A guitar is a very passionate and mobile instrument. Players don't like feeling tethered to the technology having it mounted in their instrument. On the floor where they can operate it by foot contact, fine, but control with the hands is typically too difficult and distracting when playing. Changing eye focus from the audience to your instrument to make electronic adjustments is at best clumsy. Adjusting with your feet is still the best option. Its close but a good player can maintain his upper body composure while stomping on pedals below, literally walking and chewing gum at the same time. Sacrificing notes to make adjustments beyond something as simple as a volume or pickup selector robs the artists focus from being on the audience and the audience feels neglected every time. Next time you see a really good show see if the guitarists are futzing over the electronics or are they focused on playing the notes.
          Well I have been playing my MIDI guitar in church right along with my "regular" guitars! I DO NOT WANT to learn a new instrument like piano which takes years to learn properly by the way...so that is why I use MIDI guitar equipment.I can play strings, horns, flutes you name it on the instrument I learned on. WITHOUT having to learn another! This whole notion of keyboard players being the only ones who should play MIDI sounds is stupid.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by samal50 View Post
            Good explanation. I was hoping the guitar would have AI capabilities LOL. Couldn't I just turn my guitars "high tech" by buying an add-on? I think there's a product that could turn my guitar MIDI-capable.
            Of course! Three I can name off the top of my head are Jam Origin....which uses a regular guitar! No 13 pin guitar needed. Then there is the Roland GR 55 and GR 33 which uses the 13 pin technology, but they also have a GK 3 you can put onto your exsisting guitar. Finally...there is the fishman triple play, which to me has the best tracking period! But it uses a laptop or you can buy an optional footswitch to hook up to it if you have a rack unit and do not want to use a computer onstage.
            Last edited by webe123; 07-15-2018, 06:09 PM.

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