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Is the moog guitar just not all that?

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  • Is the moog guitar just not all that?

    It's funny, the original Ebow patent anticipates a hex system and for years and years people said that's what they wanted.
    There's even the "no, we dont have a hex system" in the sustainiac FAQs

    SO now it's here, but it doesn't seem all that popular. For instance, youtube videos seem pretty much market material, not a whole lot of independent users posting stuff they've done.

    Is it just a price point as barrier to entry thing? (the custom shop one is expensive, but the regular one doesn't seem all that bad and seems inline with a PRS or Les Paul or something)

    Or is it a cool idea that isn't all that cool in practice?

    Just too new or different? (I don't think electric guitarists are really the nonconformist rebels they are made out to be...at least not anymore)

  • #2
    Here's my take:

    Yeah, I'd like to give one a try. But it's a different instrument, right? It's going to take some time to figure out what to do - musically - with variable sustain (and anti-sustain), which means that I'd want to have one at home for a few months.

    $3,000 for an experiment is pretty steep... I might consider investing $500 or so in an add-on for an existing guitar, but $3,000...? Nope. No way.

    And then there's the matter of aesthetics. Yup, I'm shallow. Looks matter. And that instrument doesn't have the slightest bit of appeal to me in a visual sense.

    So, $3,000 for an ugly (to me, at least) instrument that may or may not turn out to be musically useful...? That's why *I* won't buy one.
    <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot;There is no best in music.&quot;<br />
    -- Neil Young, 1987<br />
    <br />
    <a href="http://lamkins-guitar.com/" target="_blank">My music pages</a></div>

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    • #3
      Totally fair. Thanks for writing

      BTW I don't have a dog in this or anything. Just sort of curious. It seemed like it had a bunch of fanfare, but I just haven't seen it really get traction

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      • #4
        I've read complaints about noisy pickups when used as a normal guitar (no Vo power or anything like that). I think that's one reason why one customer opted to have his made to order: http://www.moogmusic.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=11369

        The Moog Lap Steel is reportedly of better quality than the Moog Guitar E1.

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        • #5
          I'd also be very interested to try one out, but as mentioned the price is an issue as far as buying one. I'm also not crazy about the three color options available for the standard model. My PRS Santana SE has a Sustainiac and Roland synth pickup installed and it gets me into some of the territory that the Moog might go, but if money was no object, I'd probably grab one of those original limited edition Moog guitars.

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          • #6
            moogophiles have very little interest in guitars, and guitarists (mostly) have very little interest in overpriced "guitar-like" instruments

            notable exceptions

            Comment


            • #7
              I(I don't think electric guitarists are really the nonconformist rebels they are made out to be...at least not anymore)


              I agree. If I had plenty of money to burn on some kind of guitar-like synth interface, I'd probably spend it on an Eigenharp rather than a Moog Guitar. But that's just me.

              Well, with that kind of money I'd have enough to also get a Moog Lap Steel, with a hex pickup so I can run into a VG-99 for instant alternate tunings.

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              • #8
                Part of it is that people just don't understand what it does (most of the demos I've seen don't really help), so it's just kind of a black box (and a very expensive one, at that). But I think the biggest problem is that guitarists are very picky about things like neck shape, scale length, fret size, strings, etc. If you could plug the system directly into any guitar it would probably be more popular, but (kind of like the Variax), few guitarists are going to buy it if hey don't like how it feels . . . (if you can even find one in a store to try it out - I haven't seen any). I think that's the biggest hurdle. (I'd love one, by the way - I could probably live with however it feels, but even $2k for the B-stock is hard for me to justify . . . )
                <div class="signaturecontainer"><img title="thumbs up" alt="" border="0" src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/thumb.gif">deals with: -Juggernaut-; Shooto; CicadaSilence; Cheebus; 59Vampire; hivedestruction; dotlikeimpact; xjordanx<br><br><br><br></div>

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                • #9
                  and guitarists (mostly) have very little interest in overpriced "guitar-like" instruments


                  yeah, it's a funny one. I mean some guys (like Segovia) have talked about electric guitars along those sort of lines.

                  what's interesting about this one though is really closely related technology gets play. From quite a few of the answers, seems like price point and some aesthetic factors are major players

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                  • #10
                    Well, sure, I could pick up a Moog Guitar for $300 instead of $3000 I'd have one right now.

                    What keeps me from the $7000 model - yes, even more than the price - is the flame maple top - can't stand that type of top on guitars.

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                    • Triplanetary
                      Triplanetary commented
                      Editing a comment

                      I think that all of you have good points.  The price should be dropping right now. Moog Music is making the mistake of passing the cost of development along to the users.  It is not 1968 again, the first person to make Moogs ideas cheap enough for a student rather than a Dentist will sell most of them The first guy to make make a controllable Midi  (not CV) Theremin (in actual fact a Tannerin) and a more flexible guitar sustainer ( a small controllable electromagnet) are going to take the market.  MXR sells more analog delays, Synthesizers .com makes any Moog modular prohibitive, they can't even play in their own sandbox.

                      Like nearly everyone I am rooting for Moog but if I can get four Behringers (without bells and whistles,ok ) but I get change.  Moogs end up being like Cadillacs but not because they are insruments not cars.

                       


                  • #11
                    Its priced for exclusivity in combination with the average tonally ultra conservative guitar audience which will make it essentially a musical oddity until a high profile player works some of the unique tones its capable of into some pop songs. If you haven't seen the demo vids where they put one in the hands of Vernon Reid, Kaki King, and a few other pros, its worth watching to see their reactions.



                    <div class="signaturecontainer"><b><br><br></b><div align="center"><font color="#0073bc"><font color="#000000"><a href="http://www.reverbnation.com/willchentrio" target="_blank">Will Chen Trio</a> | <a href="http://FrugalGuitarist.com" target="_blank">FrugalGuitarist.com</a> | <a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/FrugalGuitaristcom/52247336654" target="_blank">FG on Facebook</a> | <a href="http://forum.frugalguitarist.com/" target="_blank">Forum</a><br><br></font></font></div></div>

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                    • #12
                      moogophiles have very little interest in guitars, and guitarists (mostly) have very little interest in overpriced "guitar-like" instruments

                      notable exceptions


                      I don't think you need to be a Moogophile to be interested in something like this. Unless by "Moogophile" you mean "someone who likes to buy very expensive name-brand MI gear"...



                      As far as the "guitar-like instrument" comment... I think you're onto something. As I said, I'd love to experiment with a Moog guitar. I know it's a different instrument that will require some adaptation by me in order to exploit the capabilities of the instrument as best *I* can, given my own skills and aesthetics. But I'm not prepared to spend $3,000 on an experiment... Heck, I'm not sure I'd even be playing a *guitar* if the initial cost of entry was several thousand dollars...
                      <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot;There is no best in music.&quot;<br />
                      -- Neil Young, 1987<br />
                      <br />
                      <a href="http://lamkins-guitar.com/" target="_blank">My music pages</a></div>

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        Its priced for exclusivity in combination with the average tonally ultra conservative guitar audience which will make it essentially a musical oddity until a high profile player works some of the unique tones its capable of into some pop songs. If you haven't seen the demo vids where they put one in the hands of Vernon Reid, Kaki King, and a few other pros, its worth watching to see their reactions.


                        I've watched the videos, and they *are* very intriguing. The variety of approaches to instrument exhibited in the many celebrity demos online just reinforces my notion that the Moog Guitar needs to be approached as something not-quite-a-guitar. Watching a demo doesn't tell me anything about how *I* might respond to the instrument.
                        <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot;There is no best in music.&quot;<br />
                        -- Neil Young, 1987<br />
                        <br />
                        <a href="http://lamkins-guitar.com/" target="_blank">My music pages</a></div>

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          I've watched the videos, and they *are* very intriguing. The variety of approaches to instrument exhibited in the many celebrity demos online just reinforces my notion that the Moog Guitar needs to be approached as something not-quite-a-guitar. Watching a demo doesn't tell me anything about how *I* might respond to the instrument.


                          I think it gives you as good an idea as any gear demo. I mean, certainly no vid can tell you the limits of you own personal creativity, same with the demo of any effect or instrument for that matter. I can demo a Jazzmaster but give one to Thurston Moore and the experience would be night and day. But surely it gives you a good idea of the potential such a piece of gear has and how it offers an experience far beyond a traditional guitar without too much effort. Those demos are initial reactions, not after learning special techniques nor dialing the thing in for months (though they probably had some help from sales/marketing reps). I'd love to own one really, just too pricey. Cut the cost by a grand or so and I'd be way more tempted, cut the cost in half and I'd already probably own one.
                          <div class="signaturecontainer"><b><br><br></b><div align="center"><font color="#0073bc"><font color="#000000"><a href="http://www.reverbnation.com/willchentrio" target="_blank">Will Chen Trio</a> | <a href="http://FrugalGuitarist.com" target="_blank">FrugalGuitarist.com</a> | <a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/FrugalGuitaristcom/52247336654" target="_blank">FG on Facebook</a> | <a href="http://forum.frugalguitarist.com/" target="_blank">Forum</a><br><br></font></font></div></div>

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                          • #15
                            yeah, seen the videos, they are pretty much marketing materials ("moog factory tours" and such) I haven't seen a great number of more independent videos.

                            Sounds like the price point is a pretty big factor for most guys...whew! good thing we play guitar, we're spoiled with cheap instruments.

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