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How to perform when not singing?

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  • How to perform when not singing?

    I'm new to singing (1 year) and have been working on my stage presence.  Trouble is that we have two vocalists in the band and I don't know what to do with myself while she is singing.  Neither I, nor she, has any roll in the other's songs.  I wanted all of my songs in one set and all of hers in the other, but the band wants to alternate 2ish songs at a time.

    The next gig is in 2 weeks, and it's not likely that we'll get much practice together before then, so I'm basically on my own.  Do I step off stage every other song, or what?  Thanks for posting.


  • #2
    Get a tambourine
    I like when they say a movie is inspired by a true story. That's kind of silly. "Hey, did you hear that story about that lady who drove her car into the lake with her kids and they all drowned?" "Yeah, I did, and you know what - that inspires me to write a movie about a gorilla!"

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    • davie
      davie commented
      Editing a comment

      staticsound wrote:
      Get a tambourine

      lol. i was gonna suggest the same thing. I actually bought a tambourine about a month ago too :smileylol:

       

      Just sing harmonies/background vocal, play a tambourine and dance a bit. lol


    • staticsound
      staticsound commented
      Editing a comment
      Or twerk...

    • davie
      davie commented
      Editing a comment

      staticsound wrote:
      Or twerk...

      LOL


  • #3

    yeah I agree with the Tambourine comment, just dont hit it too hard and stay in time with the music. However, as a good vocalist, you should always be able to bring something to the table when the other person is singing the lead. Perhaps adding a harmony to key phrases in a chorus, sha' las, dooh whaps etc. Otherwise, you might come across as superfluous to to each other. Try to find Youtube videos of duo's in action to see how they react to each other. Most of my work is solo but I do a few gigs as a duo and I am nearly as busy when my singing partner is doing lead as when I am doing lead. You can also learn to interact with the audience as well as this will also make the whole performance more polished

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    • AntzyClancy
      AntzyClancy commented
      Editing a comment

      Good?  Well, I'm an inexperienced vocalist.  I'm also a male vocalist and she tends to sing songs that are out of my range.  Am I suppose to add harmonies below her pitch?  That doesn't sound right.


    • davie
      davie commented
      Editing a comment

      AntzyClancy wrote:

      Good?  Well, I'm an inexperienced vocalist.  I'm also a male vocalist and she tends to sing songs that are out of my range.  Am I suppose to add harmonies below her pitch?  That doesn't sound right.


      If you want to do harmonies with her then try singing 'oo's in high falsetto.


    • remarkable1967
      remarkable1967 commented
      Editing a comment

      Yeah exactly right. It sounds like you know what you are doing as a vocalist so just pick hamrony to suit the particular word or line she sings. The fact that she sings at one end of the scale and you fill in from below should be the same as you being the bass and her filling in above. Think of harmony groups like The Beach Boys, Eagles, Bee Gees...... Although these are all male voices, the leads are all able to pitch where most females would be yet the rest of the group are able to fill in the 3rd, 4th or 5th part of the harmony. Youtube is great for checking out live performance videos of duos and harmony groups so just look how they do it. On the odd ocassion that I do duo gigs, we do Heartbeat & It Doesn't Matter Anymore by Buddy Holly. Now although these songs never had harmony lines originally, we do them fully with harmonies as if they had been done by the Everly Brothers and they sound great. Just have fun with it and try some different things. You may even find that over 3 or 4 gigs, you do something different everytime.


  • #4

    Yeah, I would say look for other bands that have more than one vocalist and see what they do.  Like others have said, singing harmonies and interacting with the crowd are good ideas.  I'd also add that for future gigs, it's always good to practice the same way you'll perform onstage.  At least as much as you possibly can.  That way, you'll feel more prepared when the next show comes along.

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