Harmony Central Forums
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Unable to hit high notes above E (10 notes above middle c)

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse







X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Unable to hit high notes above E (10 notes above middle c)


    I'm a male singer, 35. Have been singing in bands all my adult life.

    A month ago I woke up one morning after a gig the previous night, and noticed I had completely lost the ability to sing notes

    that most male non-singer can reach. I used to be able to reach high notes with little effort. Now singing the highest notes I can uses

    up all my breath and I have to stop. It's as if my muscles wont go into the position to reach the higher notes. I went to see a throat

    specialist but he couldn't see anything wrong. Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks!


  • #2

    Are you talking about the super high falsetto notes? Rarely anyone sings up there nor many songs that go that high. Or are you talking about the 'E' note that's right after the middle range?

    ____________________________________
    Moderator - The Singer's Forum
    Follow me on Twitter and Soundcloud

    Comment


    • hencca
      hencca commented
      Editing a comment

      Yeah I've been to an ENT doctor. He saw nothing out of the ordinary. Truly weird. A singing teacher said it was alright to practice as long as it didn't hurt, so today I had normal band practice an I seem to be making progress. So hopefully everything will be back to normal in a few months.


    • Masklin
      Masklin commented
      Editing a comment

      That piano you linked to does not use scientific pitch notation. E4 on that piano is E5 in scientific pitch notation, and that's very high. It's what a radio pop song tops around if the singer is female.


    • deepflight
      deepflight commented
      Editing a comment

      Masklin wrote:

      That piano you linked to does not use scientific pitch notation. E4 on that piano is E5 in scientific pitch notation, and that's very high. It's what a radio pop song tops around if the singer is female.


      I wonder if he is confused because sheet music for tenors is often written an octave up on the treble clef for clairity and he really means E4 (E3 on the linked piano picture)?

Working...
X