Harmony Central Forums
Announcement
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Time for another rant

Collapse



X
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Time for another rant

    Hey peeps.



    A day ago or so my choir had a concert, and I found that (perhaps because of the background noise) my throat got really sore and tired after just 15 minutes or so. I lost 4 notes in my bottom (which is problematic as I sing bass).



    When I came home again my range and resonance was back.



    Now, the root of the problem is that I just can't dangit sing without straining and pulling. It's sooo frustrating. Sometimes I think I got it down, but then when I wake up the next day I can't find it again.



    I'm trying to focus on what our Oiselle said once: That you shouldn't 'feel' your voice in your throat at all. It works somewhat... at least when I have 10 seconds to think and focus before attempting a note.



    Yay...
    I'm Masklin. How was your day?

  • #2
    So, what do you do personally to ensure that your vocals are effortless for the throat?
    I'm Masklin. How was your day?

    Comment


    • #3
      I get soreness etc if I don't warm up. It's guaranteed after about 15 (same as you). Plus I don't sing stuff outside my range. I guess I'll never be Freddie but I'm not too worried.
      Hamilton Steele CD's / Hamilton Steele MP3 Downloads / Hamilton Steele iTunes

      Comment


      • #4
        So if you warm up for 15 minutes, you get sore, and if you sing without warming up for 15 mins you get sore?



        How do you warm up in order NOT to get sore, then?
        I'm Masklin. How was your day?

        Comment


        • #5
          If I don't warm up I get a sore throat after fifteen minutes.

          If I warm up I don't get a sore throat.



          Singing Voice Lessons

          www.singingvoicelessons.com
          Hamilton Steele CD's / Hamilton Steele MP3 Downloads / Hamilton Steele iTunes

          Comment


          • #6
            But singing and warming up are largely the same thing, aren't they?
            I'm Masklin. How was your day?

            Comment


            • #7
              Warmups are exercises designed to prepare you for singing, ideally to get you "in the zone" where you won't be straining or "pulling" during actual performance.



              And yes, ideally you shouldn't feel much of anything, effort wise in your throat. For me, warmups are mostly about placement of resonance, so as I go higher in my range, the sound naturally move up into my head and face. But my throat doesn't feel it. Even when I add grit for something like a Motorhead cover, it feels "normal" because I'm not straining in my throat to do it.



              Anyway, warm up exercises should be very focused on particular outcomes, very different from normal singing of songs.
              Talking about music is like dancing about architecture. - Martin Mull

              Comment


              • #8
                Particular outcomes such as not feeling your throat, or feeling a buzz behind your eyes, etc?



                Anyway, warming up won't help me, since also when I warm up and focus on placing the note correctly, I fail at doing so. Most of the time anyway.
                I'm Masklin. How was your day?

                Comment


                • #9






                  Quote Originally Posted by Masklin
                  View Post

                  But singing and warming up are largely the same thing, aren't they?




                  I wouldn't say so. Like weight training. You warm up with light non weighted movements then progress to light weights and then work up. If the max weight you can bench press is 200 lbs you don't warm up with 200 lbs. You start light and work your way up before actually doing your workout. When you warm up for a workout you don't tire the muscle you'll need to be using. You just get blood flowing through them and "warm" them. Maybe get a little sweat on your forehead making sure your core is warmed.

                  Same with singing. Warmups should be light and progressive (exercises) working up to what you might be using in your actual singing. But not tiring yourself out. Just "warming up." Not really "singing."



                  Sometimes there are certain things you may not be able to do with your voice until completely warmed. The muscles need to loosen so to speak. I like to save more difficult songs for after I've sung some easier ones.
                  Tommy




                  My song covers
                  http://www.soundclick.com/bands/defa...bandID=1246058

                  Video


                  “The blues ain't nothing but a good man feelin' bad”
                  ~ Leon Redbone~

                  Comment


                  • #10






                    Quote Originally Posted by Masklin
                    View Post

                    But singing and warming up are largely the same thing, aren't they?




                    My teacher taught me to warm up and cool down. My warm up in a combination of scales, vocalises and vocal fries. The cool down is mostly the vocal fries.



                    Here is an example of a vocal fry.






                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0raVR9T_LIw
                    http://www.ElenaHouseOnline.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I never warm up or cool down, ever. I just sing stuff. And because of the way I sing, nothing ever hurts. It’s only when I try and “belt” (which I still can’t work out how to do properly), does my voice have problems. Nothing hurts too much, but after about half an hour my voice will begin to cut out, there’ll be coughing, discomfort in the throat, and I also get light headed and chest pains. Great, eh!? lol In my opinion, no amount of warming up will help with this because obviously I'm doing things completely wrong!
                      All things must pass...

                      Comment













                      Working...
                      X