Harmony Central Forums
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Can't reach head voice (male)

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse









X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Can't reach head voice (male)

    Hey guys. I'm a male with a pretty deep baritone voice and for a while I haven't been able to easily sing in my head voice. (Just to clear up confusion about falsetto vs. head voice: I'm talking about the really high voice you use when you're trying to imitate talking like a baby.) I can sometimes hit a note or two in my head voice, but I can't hold the note for very long or change the note, etc. Other times I can't even reach my head voice at all -- it just seems like it's non-existent. I'm wondering what I can do to develop my head voice to a point where I can at least sing in it regularly, since right now I can't even use my head voice to speak in (as if I were imitating a baby talking). I remember a time when it was easy for me to use my head voice, so I know what it should feel and sound like, but just I'm not sure why I can't get there right now. Any tips?

  • #2
    Hedsetto is difficult when your voice is tired or worn, so make sure you're not regularly mistreating your voice by for example talking in loud environments somewhere in your daily routine.

    Otherwise, I have no clue. I think I practised by just trying to sing along to all my favourite songs in hedsetto, dedicating a few neurons to the cause. ;-)
    I'm Masklin. How was your day?

    Comment


    • #3
      Okay, thanks for the tips!

      Comment


      • #4
        Try yodelling an octave using an 'aw' vowel on the bottom and an 'oo' vowel at the top. Just let the voice flip and resonate in your 'head' space. And try to imagine the air being narrower on the high note.
        ____________________________________
        Moderator - The Singer's Forum
        Follow me on Twitter and Soundcloud

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks, that's a good exercise. I'll just have to keep practicing until I get it fluid.

          Comment


          • #6
            I have been reading so much material and undergone a few vocal instructors and each time they tell me different things about Head Voice and Falsetto. (One Vocal Instructor even told me Falsetto and Head Voice are the same thing!) There is, however, one thing consistent about the difference between Head Voice and Falsetto (correct me if I am wrong). One is unable to produce a Strong Falsetto (Falsetto will sound soft, unsupported, weak and airy) while Head Voice is stronger (Rich, fuller tone, loud).

            The higher I sing, the stronger my head voice becomes and the highest I can hit is a high G. The problem is however, at around Middle F where my voice flips from Chest to Head. I've been reading about mixed voice, is there any exercise to help me practise mixed because a lot of songs out there are sung in this mixed voice region.

            Comment


            • blankfile
              blankfile commented
              Editing a comment

              Wow, yours is a very interesting case! I usually advise people to go back to their talking voice whenever they have issues with their singing voice. it usually boils down to tension. when speaking, we're bound to have less tension (well, for the most part, at least).

              So for most people, any note that they can't reach when singing, they can reach when talking. then i tell them to notice how relaxed they are when speaking the note and to bring that relaxed mode into singing.

              in your case you can't even do the note when just plain speaking. Are you sure you haven't injured your vocal chords?

              when we talk everyday, we're bound to use at least a few high pitches, especially if you're american. Americans tend to use a very wide range when they talk.

              anyway my point is how does your voice sound in everyday speech? do you flip to falsetto everytime you use a high pitch to emphasise a point for example?

              quite interesting, your case. i suspect vocal chord injury, although i hope for your sake i'm wrong

               


          • #7
            You won't find any consensus on the nature of falsetto vs head voice on this forum either. There have been numerous threads about it and I believe most of the users here are quite fed up with the discussion. Some of us now call it hedsetto in an attempt to avoid reinvigorating the hatin'.
            I'm Masklin. How was your day?

            Comment


            • #8
              Some of us now call it hedsetto in an attempt to avoid reinvigorating the hatin'.


              That's good, I like that word

              Comment


              • #9

                I finally nailed And I am telling you Jennifer Hudson... I hit B5's all day yesterday... And right now i can't use my hedsetto... That's never happened before... I can hit an E6 in falsetto but right now i cant use it at all... Like AT ALL... It sounds screechy like that sound that the reverse button made in cassette players... O_O And i have to record on Monday... Will i get my voice back by then ?

                Comment



                Working...
                X