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  • Vocal Theory Question

    When you are singing do you always have to match the instrument note for note? For instance, could I strum a G chord and sing and a B or D?
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  • #2
    usually a song have a standard tone codification, so a song is just made based in a tone, example the tone of the song rolling in the deep is C

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    • #3
      I'm going to answer your question with another question.

      When a band plays, does the lead guitarist have to match the same note that the rhythm guitarist is playing?
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      • #4
        I'm not sure what you are asking? B and D are notes in a G major chord. In fact, the chord is just G-B-D. That would work out fine and is what most singers do, land on the root, 3rd or 5th of a chord, those are the strongest sounding notes.

        If you are asking if you play a G chord can you only sing the note G? Then no, you can sing whatever you want. You can really sing any note you want over any chord, certain notes just sound stronger or "better" for the chord.

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        • #5
          usually a song have a standard tone codification, so a song is just made based in a tone,


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          • #6
            Find the blue note...those are the cool ones
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            • #7
              I'm not sure that the OP's question makes sense.... I mean, if you know any songs, you'll quickly see that melodies contain many different notes over a single chord. Most often these notes are chord tones, but they can be any note within the primary scale--and sometimes even outside it.

              I assume that you're talking about composing, right, as in cover tunes the notes are prescribed? Or perhaps harmony vocals?

              Perhaps we're not understanding you? If so, please clarify what you mean.
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              • #8
                What Urca and Jack said.


                But I might add that if you strum a G major on some instrument, and sing an A, that makes for a resulting Gadd9 chord. When this happens, the universe does not implode.

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                • #9
                  When you are singing do you always have to match the instrument note for note? For instance, could I strum a G chord and sing and a B or D?


                  melodies usually resolve to a tone within the triad. but u can use any damn note u want, as long as it sounds good. variety is nice.

                  the blue notes are the best too, b3, b5, b7. they're the ones that make many 'ginas tingle.

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                  • #10
                    When you are singing do you always have to match the instrument note for note? For instance, could I strum a G chord and sing and a B or D?


                    You can sing whatever notes you want within any structured or abstract key signature.
                    As long has you're in tune with your instrument and have a modicum of understanding with basic music theory
                    you'll have no problem. You shouldn't need anyone to tell you what is supposed to sound good or right.
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                    • #11
                      Thanks for the replies. I realize it seems kind of dumb; I know that there are different pitches occuring at the same time during a song. I'm just trying to increase my vocal ability, and sometimes the notes that I sing aren't the primary note. Sometimes it sounds good to me and other people don't like it. Is the singing typically right on with the primary note in 3 chord, open position, rudimentary strumming songs?
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                      • #12
                        Say your singing to a basic 3 chord song...G,D,A. You could "sing" a G, D, and an A...if you want the song to be stale and boring. If the songs in the key of G, you could pretty much sing any note in that scale. So to answer your question, no, typically you don't want to sing the primary note...stale and boring...see above! Google music theory...
                        <div class="signaturecontainer"><i>I like when they say a movie is inspired by a true story. That's kind of silly. &quot;Hey, did you hear that story about that lady who drove her car into the lake with her kids and they all drowned?&quot; &quot;Yeah, I did, and you know what - that inspires me to write a movie about a gorilla!&quot; </i><br />
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                        <a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/DerekReno?feature=mhee" target="_blank">My YouTube Channel</a><br />
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                        • #13
                          I'm still not sure I understand. You sing the notes the songwriter tells you to sing, no? oke:

                          Are you talking about doing vocal exercises over chords? Or are you talking about the early stages of composition, where one searches for a melody over a progession? Or are you talking about sending out random notes to see what your voice sounds like?

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                          • #14
                            I guess I just need to develop my ear more. I try to cover some songs and I sing it the way I feel like it is to be sung. However, I'll break out a tuner and check myself, only to find out that that I am singing a note that is not the tonic note. Basically, I am insecure about my singing, and I am looking for some kind of benchmark for quality.
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                            • #15
                              Okay, good. This is what you do: You learn the melody of the song on guitar--just the melody, no jamming, no riffs, no noodling around. Then woodshed the melody, over and over again. Then do it another 10, 20, 30 times after you think you know it.

                              Then try singing the melody along with the chords. If necessary, do only a few measures at a time.
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                              Deering Sierra Banjo<br />
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                              &quot;If you don’t like Springsteen that means you don’t like Woody Guthrie, which means you don’t like songs.&quot; Justin Townes Earle</div>

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