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  • Brett Manning Singing Success

    Hi,
    I've been using this singing program called Brett Manning's Singing Success. Anyone heard of it? For those of you who have been using it or anything similar to it, I really need some help!

    I'm pretty sure I'm using/practicing my mix voice right when I do the exercises, however, I'm clueless on how to actually use it in a song. To me, it sounds weak, whimpy, and just doesn't suit any song!

    And about chest voice, my highest note is G# above middle C (that's not very high), but even when I sing songs which hit the G note, I still slip out off and on and squeek sometimes. Before I started this program, I used to pull up chest voice, stretching my neck up and just going louder as I go higher. Now I'm using a much lighter technique and keeping the volume as steady as possible. However, despite doing all of Singing Success's exercises (I'm up to the 7th CD), my range hasn't really improved very much. In fact I don't think it has at all. Please help me out here! I really want to expand my range and sing with rich tone + vibrato but I just don't know if I'm going the right way.

    Just a little extra info, I've had 3 different vocal coaches before the program, and about all of them told me to release/use more breath and go louder as I sang higher notes. This actually contradicts what I'm doing in the Singing Success program where I should use less breath as I go higher. I don't have a vocal coach anymore and am placing full commitment/hope in this program. Is what I'm doing a good idea? or should I try another vocal coach?


    Thanks

  • #2
    Hello?? Anyone?

    Comment


    • #3
      First question, are you a baritone or a tenor? My guess is you're a baritone because you said G#4 is your highest note.

      My second question is what is your lowest note you can project? For example I'm a baritone and can hit a low C, two octaves below middle C (aka C2), but The lowest sound I can project with strength is a G2 (a fifth higher than C2).

      I've used Brett's program before, and I'm not very fond of it. To answer one of your questions, yes you do need more breath and proper (no forced) support when go higher. The reason is because your vocal chords need to vibrate faster to create the higher pitch, so the air you're pushing from your lungs needs to come out faster.

      Another thing is make sure you relax when you sing or else you are going to hurt yourself. I've done it.. it sucks. One last thing is change doesn't happen over night how long have you been sinning and how old are you?

      Comment


      • #4
        To be honest with you man, Singing Success saved me. I was singing with horrible technique. Do the exercises through and through, until you get them down perfect. When you master one lesson, move on to the next. Don't get anxious and move to the next lesson, until you can do the previous one with ease. When you're doing the exercises, focus on proper technique and placement. Over time, you will sing exactly like you do your exercises (loose, with no tention, and controlled). This worked for me. It might not for everyone else. Give it a try.
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        • #5
          Hi Kevin, Singing Success is an excellent vocal method. Stick with it, you are almost reaching the "style" CD's in which Brett Manning demonstrates how to use the technique you are learning within the context of a song. Most of the remaining CDs (the last 3 or 4 I believe) are geared towards singing style. Granted the majority of the vocal riffs and sylistic examples are in the POP/R&B genre.

          An (inexpensive) method for increasing range that I have found very helpful for me personally is Thomas Appell's: Can You Sing A High C Without Straining? It is more streamlined and condensed than the Singing Success Method, but really took me where I wanted to be as far as my range goes. The range excersises on the vocal practice CD, seemed what was missing in the Singing Success method. For me the two methods however, make the perfect combination. Ultimately, with home based singing methods it is a very personal decision, so who know it may or may not be right for you.

          Comment


          • #6
            Eyelike, he's tenor. He said that the G#4 was chest voice, no way a baritone can sing up there in chest. That's nearing the top of their head voice.

            Peekaboo, thanks for the tip. I already have Singing Success but have not had the time to start using it. I think I'll try to get Can You Sing A High C too.
            Thanks you.^_^.
            Music major, specializing in vocal performance.I do love to compose piano pieces too.^_^.

            Comment


            • #7
              One last thing is change doesn't happen over night how long have you been sinning and how old are you?

              I've started taking singing seriously since 2005 by taking vocal classes. I started Brett Manning's program middle of last year. I'm turning 17 in a month.


              An (inexpensive) method for increasing range that I have found very helpful for me personally is Thomas Appell's: Can You Sing A High C Without Straining? It is more streamlined and condensed than the Singing Success Method, but really took me where I wanted to be as far as my range goes. The range excersises on the vocal practice CD, seemed what was missing in the Singing Success method. For me the two methods however, make the perfect combination. Ultimately, with home based singing methods it is a very personal decision, so who know it may or may not be right for you.


              Does that mean that singing success doesn't emphasize enough on range increase? I have also noticed that Brett always emphasizes on having a smooth blend of chest and mix voice to sing high notes, but I still can't quite comprehend how it works. Male singers don't actually sing A notes with mix voice (as demonstrated in the song Dig by Incubus), I would love to sing that song one day though. Do you think this other program you mentioned will help me get there faster? Also, since you use both programs, do you schedule yourself to use one or the other at different times of the week? When I'm free of exams, I use Brett's program about 4-5 times a week. The only thing which bugs me is that, when watching the DVD which shows Brett teaching his students, eventhough they sound pretty OKAY to me when doing the exercises, Brett still has tons of comments to give them. So I'm worried about doing it perfect or right..

              Eyelike, he's tenor. He said that the G#4 was chest voice, no way a baritone can sing up there in chest. That's nearing the top of their head voice.

              Nah man..A tenor can definitely sing alot higher than that. Moreover, I can only hit that note for like a second during my peak!

              Comment


              • #8
                I've seen a few of Brett's videos your YouTube, and they seem very good. But his flashy, aggressive marketing turns me off. And $200 for a bunch of CDs with only one DVD seems a lot. A full set of DVDs would better merit that price.

                But, again, I have nothing against the guy and his method, which seem solid from what I can tell.
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                Comment


                • #9
                  Hi,
                  I've been using this singing program called Brett Manning's Singing Success. Anyone heard of it? For those of you who have been using it or anything similar to it, I really need some help!

                  I'm pretty sure I'm using/practicing my mix voice right when I do the exercises, however, I'm clueless on how to actually use it in a song. To me, it sounds weak, whimpy, and just doesn't suit any song!

                  And about chest voice, my highest note is G# above middle C (that's not very high), but even when I sing songs which hit the G note, I still slip out off and on and squeek sometimes. Before I started this program, I used to pull up chest voice, stretching my neck up and just going louder as I go higher. Now I'm using a much lighter technique and keeping the volume as steady as possible. However, despite doing all of Singing Success's exercises (I'm up to the 7th CD), my range hasn't really improved very much. In fact I don't think it has at all. Please help me out here! I really want to expand my range and sing with rich tone + vibrato but I just don't know if I'm going the right way.

                  Just a little extra info, I've had 3 different vocal coaches before the program, and about all of them told me to release/use more breath and go louder as I sang higher notes. This actually contradicts what I'm doing in the Singing Success program where I should use less breath as I go higher. I don't have a vocal coach anymore and am placing full commitment/hope in this program. Is what I'm doing a good idea? or should I try another vocal coach?


                  Thanks


                  G#4 in chest? serious?

                  Are you sure you're not raising your larynx?

                  Cos that's a very light tenor..

                  I mean like, the lightest of the light.

                  The main point of SLS is to keep your larynx in place, while concentrating on vocal cord coordination. If you haven't been doing this, maybe you should concentrate on developing cord control.

                  Or maybe you've suffered some vocal damage...?
                  I'm a sharpened flat - I'm a natural.







                  Originally Posted by bloodxandxrank


                  ... If all else fails make the guitarist do it.....



                  ^On the matter of learning harsh vocals.^








                  Originally Posted by wrongnote85


                  They wont go away, they'll just start making dubstep.



                  ^On whether the '-core' bands will ever go away^

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I've started taking singing seriously since 2005 by taking vocal classes. I started Brett Manning's program middle of last year. I'm turning 17 in a month.


                    If anyone knows more about the subject please correct me, but I've read and heard that the male voice doesn't completely settle till approximately age 33. So, like me you've got a little while to wait until your voice sets. With that being said vocal training will speed up the process(a little), and you will be able to smooth over those breaks easier as time and practice continues. Keep working with it, and you'll get it (Long before age 33); your range should grow a little with time too.

                    And about chest voice, my highest note is G# above middle C (that's not very high), but even when I sing songs which hit the G note, I still slip out off and on and squeek sometimes.


                    I used to try and force my chest voice up to a G#4, but finally I realized that I should be using my head voice or falsetto in that area of my range. It also took me personally a while to realize the difference between my head voice and my mixed voice; both above the chest voice. I thought my head voice was my mixed voice for a long time, until I realized the difference between the two. Once I realized which voice I was in it was easier to flow between the bridges and hit the notes.

                    Just a little extra info, I've had 3 different vocal coaches before the program, and about all of them told me to release/use more breath and go louder as I sang higher notes. This actually contradicts what I'm doing in the Singing Success program where I should use less breath as I go higher. I don't have a vocal coach anymore and am placing full commitment/hope in this program. Is what I'm doing a good idea? or should I try another vocal coach?


                    In my personal experience its always a better idea to find a *GOOD* vocal coach and stick with them. They will help you more than a CD or video ever could. Having a vocal coach and using CD's is great too, because you can ask your coach questions about the CD lessons as well.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      To answer your question Kevin, Singing Success, should also help with your range but with the Appell method, (it comes with a book, some DVD's-one being an introductory Lesson and then the vocal excercises CD), there are a few excercises that are specifically designed for increasing range. I think it is a combination of the excercises but really how he explains to sing them that makes the difference. While chest, mixed and head voice is clearly elaborated on in the Singing Success program, Thomas Appell, kind of takes it to another level for the advanced singer, by emphasizing breathing more and showing you how to get higher by adducting the vocal chords, while not being affraid to go into falsetto so as to avoid straining. This sounds strange at first, but the logic is that the only way to sing high is to shorten the length of the vocal chords. The point is that even if you are following correct technique, but you are just starting out, the muscle still needs to be trained. Going into a falsetto at the top your range in the beginning is like using a spotter at the gym or starting off with lighter weight when you are just starting your training. Eventually, the logic is that over time, the singer will graduallly raise the bar for their falsetto voice so the range of their mixed and head voice should also increase. The key with this method is the importance of being able to crescendo from a falsetto voice into full voice wihtout any breaks, "flips or warbles" as Thomas mentions-this is what many methods fail to teach and it is overlooked by other methods, but once done can take the voice to a more professional level.

                      Again this is based on MY experience with this program and it is only my opinion of it. You should first see if it is for you, because singing a high C may not be required for your repetoire just yet. It takes time and patience if you are not already a tenor, and there is the potential to damage your voice if you don't follow the method properly. Thomas also seems to encourage vocal lessons in combination with this, whereas Singing Success is kind of all-in-one-do it yourself home study course. Good luck!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The main point of SLS is to keep your larynx in place, while concentrating on vocal cord coordination. If you haven't been doing this, maybe you should concentrate on developing cord control.

                        Or maybe you've suffered some vocal damage...?


                        To be honest I don't really know. But unlike last time when I could feel my throat really rough after singing high notes, I've been using a new technique to sing those high notes now. Though there's a little bit of a cry sound in my tone (I learnt it from Singing Success) when I hit notes such as G#, I don't feel any strain at all. Moreover, my tone isn't distorted anymore, instead it's a clear and a little whinny tone. I guess I should be doing the right thing..?


                        In my personal experience its always a better idea to find a *GOOD* vocal coach and stick with them. They will help you more than a CD or video ever could. Having a vocal coach and using CD's is great too, because you can ask your coach questions about the CD lessons as well.


                        I suppose you've got a point there, but most vocal coaches would already know what they want to teach you and would rather use their own material to assist teaching. Also, if they don't happen to know most of Brett's exercises and techniques, they might feel intimidated or defamed by the program and would come up with a million comments to defame the program to make themselves look better. I may be wrong, but I'm probably influenced by my bad experience with useless coaches. One of them even forced me to put aside all the music and styles I like, and do everything according to his more classical ways, music, style etc...


                        Thomas also seems to encourage vocal lessons in combination with this, whereas Singing Success is kind of all-in-one-do it yourself home study course. Good luck!


                        In case I'm not getting any vocal lessons, would I be able to cope and progress with Thomas's program by myself? I'm pretty excited about getting it though!


                        Thanks everyone!!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I had much luck with Singing success and Seth Riggs program. To the point where I needed some power. SLS is more of a pop/soft rock/country method, and WON'T work for powerful vocals such as heavy rock/metal etc....
                          Jaime Vendera, Roger Kain and thomas Appell have better methods for this.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I had much luck with Singing success and Seth Riggs program. To the point where I needed some power.


                            Sorry, I'm a little confused with what you said. Both statements seem to contradict one another...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Sorry, I'm a little confused with what you said. Both statements seem to contradict one another...
                              Sorry, I'm not English or American native... I meant that SLS took care of most aspects of singing, such as pitch, tone, resonance etc... But when I needed to sing very powerful vocals such as AC/DC, Iron Maiden, TNT and Bon Jovi, SLS didn't work. Because when you go tru Seth Riggs and Brett Mannings stuff, you are always reminded to relax, let things flow and make things smooth, and easy. Just like when you speak, that's why it's called Speech Level Singing. Try to nail AC/DC's "Back in Black" with full energy and intensity and power with SLS, and you'll see what I mean....

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