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Singing Pet Peeves.... what are yours?

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  • #31
    And I hate that acrobatic, R and B, Mariah Carey, show off every note that you have got style! Not that I could pull it off if I tried, but I still think it's way too much. Over the years I have had a few (admittedly completely naive) people ask me why I don't try out for American Idol or some such thing....


    I know this is off the path of my original post... but there are many things American Idol doesn't want people to know about how their show is run. It is a TV show first... and a talent show second.

    They don't have enough qualified producer/talent scouts to actually listen to every single one of the hundreds-of-thousands of people who audition each year, so the very first audition is basically a luck-of-the-draw shot.

    Example: In Chicago the auditions were held at Soldier field and they had maybe a dozen tents set up. Only the middle three tents actually had producers with the "golden tickets" to let good, bad, and weird selections through to see the celebrity judges. The other 9 or so tents were "thanks for auditioning, try again next year." That's why people like Jordan Sparks had to audition 4 or 5 times in different cities before she got a second audition. It's also to keep from getting the best of every city all in one swoop.

    I was too old to try out, but I took my oldest daughter who had been singing in front of festival crowds and even bands from the age of 12, when she was 18. We spent the night in the stadium with many other people who were trying out and so many people were gathering in groups to sing in the round, or with an acoustic guitar, it was pretty evident how talented so many people were. I watched every single one of them go into the outer tents, do a great tryout, and was turned away. I watched people who were marginally talented get through from being in the middle tents.

    The producers didn't even try to be subtle about it... the middle three tents had the stacks of yellow sheets, and the other tables had none.
    Baimun's big Pickup Clearance on Ebay

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    • #32
      And it's true that a skinny guy can't become a hulk too (w/o pharmaceutical help, that is).
      There is lots of examples that slim men grows big muscles. But very few men have a big muscular body without pumping iron.

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      • #33
        Common sense emerges.


        Oh, my peeve would be vocalists who start yakking before the song is over.


        even worse, i have had singers who get on stage won't shut up and it cuts into the set list.

        a microphone isn't a free pass to tell your life story. no one cares, just sing!
        .
        Listen, I know you're singing, you know you're singing, but the neighbors may think I'm torturing you.

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        • #34
          3) LSD. Get over yourself and act like a human being. So you can carry a tune in a bucket. Hooray!


          Damn, I gotta start hanging out in your neck of the woods! I ain't never seen a singer actually carry anything before!!!!!

          The SpaceNorman
          Keyboard Player and Owner of the PA and Lights
          The SpaceNorman

          www.facebook.com/SuperstarsOfRock
          www.souldoutrocks.com

          Keyboards and Tone Generators: Yamaha CP300, Kronos 88, Roland AX Synth, Motif ES Rack
          Keyboard Rack: Samson SM10 Line Mixer, Motu MIDIExpressXT MIDI Interface, Shure PSM200 IEM system, M-Audio Wireless MIDI, Live Wires IEM ear buds, iPad wOnSong.
          Stage Amplification: Stereo via 2 Yamaha DSR112s

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          • #35
            Damn, I gotta start hanging out in your neck of the woods! I ain't never seen a singer actually carry anything before!!!!!

            The SpaceNorman
            Keyboard Player and Owner of the PA and Lights


            isn't that the truth!

            i could be playing some dive in reseda, but some singers act like it's madison square garden, showing up late with their little entourage, and then leaving early with the same, acting like a "rock star" the entire time. and most of these putzes aren't nearly as talented as they thing they are.

            guess who does the bulk of loading in and out? the tiny keyboard chick (me).
            .
            Listen, I know you're singing, you know you're singing, but the neighbors may think I'm torturing you.

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            • #36
              Damn, I gotta start hanging out in your neck of the woods! I ain't never seen a singer actually carry anything before!!!!!

              The SpaceNorman
              Keyboard Player and Owner of the PA and Lights


              I hear ya. I never want to be that guy, ever.

              I like to show up early to help with equipment. I'd feel too guilty if I just showed up, sang, then left. That would be pretty lame to say the least.

              No, if I can make a band-mate's experience better by helping schlep some gear, so much the better.

              But man, I have heard some doozies in terms of excuses from other singers.
              My Prog-Metal Solo Project

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              • #37
                Hey, I've got a pet peeve concerning singers. I took some friends over 50 miles to hear a band I had heard and liked a lot. When we got there the band had been on for a while, but the place was almost empty. (about 30 people) The lead singer was obviously pissed and let us know it. His attitude and singing were not good because he felt more people should have shown up. Not only that, he made us feel it was our fault although we drove the 50 miles, we were buying drinks, and we had paid the cover.

                The more he complained the less we responded to their show. The less we responded to their show, the worse their attitude. We left after several songs. I've been an entertainer for a lot of years, and I'm aware of how much a responsive audience can turn us on and help our performance, but I still always tried to do the best I could at the time, regardless of audience response. Any comments or opinions about this?

                Al

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                • #38
                  Hey, I've got a pet peeve concerning singers. I took some friends over 50 miles to hear a band I had heard and liked a lot. When we got there the band had been on for a while, but the place was almost empty. (about 30 people) The lead singer was obviously pissed and let us know it. His attitude and singing were not good because he felt more people should have shown up. Not only that, he made us feel it was our fault although we drove the 50 miles, we were buying drinks, and we had paid the cover.

                  The more he complained the less we responded to their show. The less we responded to their show, the worse their attitude. We left after several songs. I've been an entertainer for a lot of years, and I'm aware of how much a responsive audience can turn us on and help our performance, but I still always tried to do the best I could at the time, regardless or audience response. Any comments or opinions about this?

                  Al


                  i heard stories about when chris isaak was starting out. even if he was playing to just the bartender and the cocktail waitress, he gave it his all. he figured that if he won over just one person as a new fan, then it was worth it.

                  to me, that is a great, professional attitude. there is absolutely no excuse for putting on a poor show because of a bad turnout.
                  .
                  Listen, I know you're singing, you know you're singing, but the neighbors may think I'm torturing you.

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                  • #39
                    One of the most important things I work with my students on is extending their high range This takes work and time, but it pays off. Most of my students extend their high range an octave or much more, and continue to add more notes as their muscles strengthen and coordinate. The singer should always be working to get better, and this certainly includes extending the range. But this takes time. All I'm saying is if your singer sounds like he/she is straining badly to hit notes in a particular song it doesn't help the band's image or the singer's voice, and perhaps a key change is in order until they get their range up to the task. This takes work and time. and won't happen quickly. They need to find a good teacher.

                    I believe the singer should work constantly to improve. You're right. Too many of them choose to cop out. I certainly don't buy that the singer "is a god."

                    There are many factors which create resonance and the size of the vocal cords contributes to this. However the fact still remains that a soprano, cannot sing low bass or tenor notes, and a bass will not sound like a tenor even if he sings just as high. I agree that transposing a song to fit the singer's range can damage the energy of the song if it is taken too low. However the right key for any singer to sound the best and create the most energy and excitement varies with the current existing physical abilities of that singer.

                    As to your question: the chances of your developing a range that goes as low as Johnny Cash and as high as AC/DC are about as good as winning the 100 million dollar lottery. Johnny Cash would never have attempted to sing as high, and try to sound like Dave Evans or Brian Johnson, and they could never cover Johnny Cash in his original keys. Johnny Cash was a bass and Dave and Brian are high tenors. The size of the vocal chords does dictate how high or low we can sing (especially how low) and still sound like we want to. Yes, a bass can often sing as high as a high tenor, but he does this by extending his falsetto, and it sounds like a bass singing in his falsetto, not a tenor. Once you figure out where the lowest note is you can comfortably sing, then you can go from there to extend the range upward to amazing high notes through exercises, especially with a good teacher.

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                    • #40
                      As to your question: the chances of your developing a range that goes as low as Johnny Cash and as high as AC/DC are about as good as winning the 100 million dollar lottery. Johnny Cash would never have attempted to sing as high, and try to sound like Dave Evans or Brian Johnson, and they could never cover Johnny Cash in his original keys. Johnny Cash was a bass and Dave and Brian are high tenors. The size of the vocal chords does dictate how high or low we can sing (especially how low) and still sound like we want to. Yes, a bass can often sing as high as a high tenor, but he does this by extending his falsetto, and it sounds like a bass singing in his falsetto, not a tenor. Once you figure out where the lowest note is you can comfortably sing, then you can go from there to extend the range upward to amazing high notes through exercises, especially with a good teacher.
                      Again, classical bass and baritones can have beautiful high notes, without going to falsetto. But the problem for them is technique as their repertoire haven't had any notes in that are, so they doesn't have that technique. BTW, I think Johnny Cash was considered Baritone. I'm too, but it took me time to get down to those low notes. When I sing high pitched songs, such as AC/DC i don't use falsetto unless for effect.

                      I have been able to sing higher than high tenor C for a long time in moderate volums, but recently I joined a band who plays AC/DC, Iron Maiden, Motorhead etc.. So at my first practice I realized my volume was way to low, cause I've only nailed the SLS principles who works fine for pop, but not at all for heavy metal. When I sing the songs without straining, the volume is way to low and there is no energy. When the energy level is OK, I strain, but less for each practice. So I work with this now. I've found some tricks to help: Stand up straight, head a bit upwards, use lot's of support (called power push in heavy metal terms) and visualizing techniques. It also helps to "place" the tone forward and "thinning" out the sound. Another great excercise is to sing lot's in falsetto, it seems to help strengthening the full voice upprt tones.

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                      • #41
                        Just a thought, Peter Gabriel has always had a deep voice and he can do counter-tenor notes....

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                        • #42
                          Good discussion here. Lots of great input to think about. Thanks.

                          Al

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                          • #43
                            I hear ya. I never want to be that guy, ever.

                            But man, I have heard some doozies in terms of excuses from other singers.


                            Many bands ago - we had a vocalist named Dave who was both shameless and transparent in his efforts to give the illusion that he was actually helping with schlepping without actually lifting or carrying anything. Our sound man (Big Jim - a great sound guy AND human forklift) coined a phrase during one load-in for that behavior when he shouted in a strained voice to clear a path - thinking that he was carrying something really heavy, we jumped out of the way and opened the door for him - only to watch him round the corner and enter the room carrying a single helium balloon and tell us he had a "Dave Load" coming in.

                            Ever since - anybody who walks past carrying a music stand or a single mic stand (while the rest of us are lugging cabinets, amp or keyboard cases) gets razzed mercilessly about the "Dave Load" they're lugging.
                            The SpaceNorman

                            www.facebook.com/SuperstarsOfRock
                            www.souldoutrocks.com

                            Keyboards and Tone Generators: Yamaha CP300, Kronos 88, Roland AX Synth, Motif ES Rack
                            Keyboard Rack: Samson SM10 Line Mixer, Motu MIDIExpressXT MIDI Interface, Shure PSM200 IEM system, M-Audio Wireless MIDI, Live Wires IEM ear buds, iPad wOnSong.
                            Stage Amplification: Stereo via 2 Yamaha DSR112s

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                            • #44
                              saying 'yeah' or 'baby' alot

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                              • #45
                                I'm not fond of cookie monster vocals...
                                Some of my songs:bandcamp fb soundcloud

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