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Learning Oboe

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  • Learning Oboe

    So I recently decided to learn the oboe for a concert setting type band. I chose this mostly because I feel like I need to expand my musical capabilities, and so I decided I'm come here to ask for help. If anyone can give me any references to books or websites or even just give me direct advice, I'd appreciate it
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  • #2
    Well, since no one else has said anything...

    Oboes are a pain to play well, which is why a good oboist is practically a shoo-in for a major ensemble. Since you come from a woodwind background, you'll have some knowledge of how to play, though the double-reed on the oboe generally takes a while to get down. I noticed that the players who picked up oboe when I was in college often took a few months of steady practice before it didn't sound like an animal in the throes of death.

    When repairing them, the shop owner told me about how the oboe is still played using half-keys or somesuch. Basically, some of the keys have a little hole in them and you will push the key down, but leave your finger off the hole to get a different note. I recall that it was pretty far removed from the clarinet and saxophone keys which covered the holes completely, if I'm remembering right.

    Like any wind-powered instrument, I'd suggest getting a few lessons set up to get the ball rolling.
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    • #3
      It's been awhile since I've been on, but I'd like to ask another question about oboe. Yes I started and now I've been playing for a few months and I am currently able to get an in-tune, full sound out of it. Although the skill took hours every day of practicing to finally get, I was able to do it. However, I am now finding that oboe reeds are NOT all the same, even if they are the same brand. I've heard of making your own reeds or even just adjusting an already-finished reed, would this be preferrable to just buying and playing or is it just overrated?
      <div class="signaturecontainer"><a href="http://www.livemusiciancentral.com" target="_blank">Improve Your Live Band</a></div>

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