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Good Beatles song to learn?

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  • #16
    Mother Nature's Son
    Dear Prudence
    Rocky Raccoon
    I Will
    Julia
    Piggies
    Norwegian Wood
    I'm Looking Through You

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    • #17
      Yea, I'll second the Day Tripper!
      It's a sweet riff...check out how Hendrix does it on the BBC Sessions...

      Also, I think "Here, There & Everywhere" is a really great song, and has a great chord progression, although it might be a little hard (I remember I learned it a while ago, although I don't remember it anymore).

      I think I learned some of "No Reply" at one point, but not all of it...hmm...some of the chords are really nice on that one, too.

      The Beatles used a lot of really great, unconventional (for rock songs) chords.
      Code:
      LSD
      u k i
      c y a
      y m
      o s
      n d

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      • #18
        You've got to hide your love away
        While my guitar gently weeps
        Norwegian wood
        Let it be
        Anyone seen Dano?

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        • #19
          Two of Us

          that's another one that really benefits from the harmony vocals.

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          • #20
            Rubber Soul marked a phase of acoustic music. I would start there.

            Otherwise, many of their songs contain chord progressions and melody lines that are just damned nifty.

            Try slowing down "Help" and it becomes a desperate, pained song.

            I play "I've Just Seen a Face" as a Bluegrass number. It's a great and a simple tune: G - Em - C - D
            "Rome wasn't burned in a day."

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            • #21
              My favorite Beatles songs to play acoustic (beside Blackbird):

              In My Life
              Here, There, & Everywhere
              Mother Nature's Son (I do it Travis picked)
              Things We Said Today
              Two of Us
              Ballad of John & Yoko
              Hard Day's Night
              If I Fell (Needs second vocal part)
              I Feel Fine (better with second guitar & vocal)
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              • #22
                Originally posted by zookie

                I play "I've Just Seen a Face" as a Bluegrass number. It's a great and a simple tune: G - Em - C - D


                That's a great idea.

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                • #23
                  Learn there early stuff. In my opinion, it is more challenging to play than their later stuff because their later stuff relied less on straight up guitar and more on studio musicians. If you can get past what some feel are 'teenybopper' lyrics, there are some great guitar parts in songs like Ticket to Ride, She Loves you, and other early songs. Just learning these songs you'll learn a lot about chords.

                  Most of their early stuff is electric but it's clean electric so it sounds good on acoustic too.

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                  • #24
                    Here Comes The Sun. I'm Only Sleeping. I'm Looking Through You. One After 909. Your Mother Should Know. Honey Pie. Hide Your Love Away. Love Me Do....
                      Learning the Beatles material is a great music lesson.
                    I.K.F.C.- O.T.A.- W.T.F.?.C.- E.S.C.
                    Member of the T. D. & H. faculty

                    CMWANLW

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by 69lespaul


                      I had a guitar teacher that wanted me to play it for the hammerons etc, and he took pity on my natural baritone voice and taught it to me in E. It really sounds great on my 12 string and I usually do it as a solo number between sets at gigs. The crowds seem to always like it and hell they don't know it's supposed to be in D.


                      It's in E.

                      It's easier to play capoed on the 2nd fret with an open D chord shape. Here's another trick if you have a Kyser-type capo, just capo on the first five strings and let the low E string ring free.
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                      • #26
                        Her Majesty

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                        • #27
                          Get this book.

                          Scores
                          "I never make the mistake of arguing with people for whose opinions I have no respect." (Edward Gibbon)

                          "Any sufficiently advanced troll is indistinguishable from a genuine kook." (Alan Morgan)

                          "Guitar Forums FAQ's: Why Not?"

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                          • #28

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by EuphoricGreyGuitar


                              Start with everything on Sgt. Pepper, then move on to Revlolver or Rubber Soul.


                              Actually, it may be more straightforward to learn Rubber Soul first...it was less "processed".

                              Everything from Rubber Soul through Abbey Road/Let It Be has gems and nuggets, from folk-y acoustic to rockabilly to fairly hard rock.

                              If you are a Beatles nut, definitely get the "white book" with the complete transcriptions of everything they recorded, note for note in standard notation and tab. (See my post above "Scores".)

                              As far as the Beatles-as-music-lesson goes, check out Alan Pollack's music theory analysis of the Beatles' canon:

                              http://www.icce.rug.nl/~soundscapes/DATABASES/AWP/awp-notes_on.html
                              "I never make the mistake of arguing with people for whose opinions I have no respect." (Edward Gibbon)

                              "Any sufficiently advanced troll is indistinguishable from a genuine kook." (Alan Morgan)

                              "Guitar Forums FAQ's: Why Not?"

                              Eagle River Manifesto on religion.

                              Troll-Alt-Delete

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by alexslashaxel
                                I am interested in learning something from the beatles, mainly acoustic. I have learned most of black bird, but i was wanted something. Im not really a huge beatles afficanado, so Im looking for suggestions.


                                How about the one Richard Starkey wrote called "Kobe the Rapist Averages 45 ppg and the Lakers Still Blow!"

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