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Donnas guitarist laments ongoing grunge "backlash"

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  • Another day to face up,
    Another day to wake up on the Feed Kill Chain
    "The jerk store called and they're running out of you"- George Costanza

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Red Ant


      True, but it seems we're few and far between. Most people seem to view the 80s with some kind of rose-colored, "cheese-filter" nostalgia-glasses. I was 20 in 1984 and i knew horrible cheese when i heard it


      That's another thing neither "camp" wants to admit. The type of people that like bands like Creed and Nickelback now are the same type that liked cheezy hair-metal in the 80's.

      Same lemming mentality, different generation.

      Steve
      Pigpen said it was OK!







      Originally Posted by mdog114


      Boy, you should REALLY go back and slap you're teachers!

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Electric Catfish


        That's another thing neither "camp" wants to admit. The type of people that like bands like Creed and Nickelback now are the same type that liked cheezy hair-metal in the 80's.

        Same lemming mentality, different generation.

        Steve


        its statements like these that made me start the Everything Sucks Brigade. because its right on the mark, and i've been surrounded by bloated, ****************ty music my entire life. so i have to go find good music, in a time where everything else just plain sucks.

        i'm beginning to think that while decent music was on its way out in the late 70s, the death of john lennon really put the nail in the coffin. (no pun intended)
        The Common Sense Mets Fan

        There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there always has been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge." - Isaac Asimov, Newsweek (21 January 1980)

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Help!I'marock!


          its statements like these that made me start the Everything Sucks Brigade. because its right on the mark, and i've been surrounded by bloated, ****************ty music my entire life. so i have to go find good music, in a time where everything else just plain sucks.

          i'm beginning to think that while decent music was on its way out in the late 70s, the death of john lennon really put the nail in the coffin. (no pun intended)


          Great Rock music, as a movement, died around 1976. Its true that some GREAT rock music has been made since then, but not nearly with the same consistency as before. Interestingly enough, around the same thing the Music industry really became an Industry. Think there might be a connection there?
          Keep the company of those who seek the truth, and run from those who have found it.

          -- Vaclav Havel

          The Universe is unimaginably vast. For small creatures such as we the vastness is bearable only through love.

          -- Carl Sagan


          Life - the way it really is - is a battle not between Bad and Good but between Bad and Worse.

          -- Joseph Brodsky

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Help!I'marock!


            its statements like these that made me start the Everything Sucks Brigade. because its right on the mark, and i've been surrounded by bloated, ****************ty music my entire life. so i have to go find good music, in a time where everything else just plain sucks.

            i'm beginning to think that while decent music was on its way out in the late 70s, the death of john lennon really put the nail in the coffin. (no pun intended)


            can i join the brigade?
            www.myspace.com/aloftinthesundry

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Red Ant


              Great Rock music, as a movement, died around 1976. Its true that some GREAT rock music has been made since then, but not nearly with the same consistency as before. Interestingly enough, around the same thing the Music industry really became an Industry. Think there might be a connection there?


              Folks we have a winner! The Music Industry actually "killed" good music.
              My Blog

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              R9-->Teese Picture Wah-->Korg DT-10-->Splawn Quick Rod-->Scumback loaded Marshall 1960av

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Help!I'marock!


                its statements like these that made me start the Everything Sucks Brigade. because its right on the mark, and i've been surrounded by bloated, ****************ty music my entire life. so i have to go find good music, in a time where everything else just plain sucks.

                i'm beginning to think that while decent music was on its way out in the late 70s, the death of john lennon really put the nail in the coffin. (no pun intended)


                No doubt it was always really bad out there. I was a teen in the 80s. Almost everybody knew Motley Crue, Winger, or Ratt, when you told them that you liked Gary Moore, they had no idea who he was, he wasn't standard media-forced stuff.

                I think the media/record company part has worsened a lot, but i think the internet and satellite radio and other technology may send things back to the 60's or 70's, when radio DJ's could play something new they liked to let you hear it. Although, my cable TV has gotten rid of "the Ameicana" music choice channel. I've literally bought at least 20 or 30 CD's just by hearing a song or two from an artist there.

                I think Frampton Comes Alive and Rumors created the idea it's all about selling the stuff in the late 70s. And perhaps the Record Companies will end up destroying themsleves, as they've spiraled downaward.
                "The jerk store called and they're running out of you"- George Costanza

                Comment


                • Originally posted by binkydaclown


                  Folks we have a winner! The Music Industry actually "killed" good music.


                  actually, it paints a pretty good picture of what happened. for more insight into this line of thinking, please see "the real frank zappa book".

                  sandwich - as long as you're willing to blow holes in arguments on both sides, you're quite welcome to join the brigade.
                  The Common Sense Mets Fan

                  There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there always has been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge." - Isaac Asimov, Newsweek (21 January 1980)

                  Comment


                  • John Fogerty was (self admitted) not a great guitarist but he still made alot of cool songs as did Kurt Cobain.
                    In the end rock is about attitude and good songs and has been from the beginning.
                    ~ Fear is your only god ~

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by RUExp?
                      John Fogerty was (self admitted) not a great guitarist but he still made alot of cool songs as did Kurt Cobain.
                      In the end rock is about attitude and good songs and has been from the beginning.

                      John Fogerty also went back in the middle of his career, after he had written a lot of songs and made big bux, and took lessons from Supertramp guitarist and first-call session pro Carl Verheyen, so maybe he felt that attitude wasn't everything.
                      Originally Posted by requiem156


                      Dokken has no album called Storm of Dragons. If they did, the songs would all be about this one dragon who got his heart broken by a mean female dragon. The riffs and solos would be killing, though.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by PFB


                        No doubt it was always really bad out there. I was a teen in the 80s. Almost everybody knew Motley Crue, Winger, or Ratt, when you told them that you liked Gary Moore, they had no idea who he was, he wasn't standard media-forced stuff.

                        Kind of ironic that if you asked John Sykes, Vivian Campbell, or a number of other '80s players that had great chops who their biggest influences were, Gary Moore's name almost alway came up.

                        Moore also auditioned for Ozzy, but apparently there were personality conflicts. Ozzy ended up singing on a tune of Gary's on the metal album he made before he did his big blues comeback.
                        Originally Posted by requiem156


                        Dokken has no album called Storm of Dragons. If they did, the songs would all be about this one dragon who got his heart broken by a mean female dragon. The riffs and solos would be killing, though.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Frank Prince

                          John Fogerty also went back in the middle of his career, after he had written a lot of songs and made big bux, and took lessons from Supertramp guitarist and first-call session pro Carl Verheyen, so maybe he felt that attitude wasn't everything.


                          Fogerty has, in post-Creedence days, become something of a perfectionist and an odd duck. He has scrapped entire albums. (Hoodoo, anybody?)

                          I'm not sure he ever felt that attitude was everything; I just think he has a comprehensive vision of how he wants his **************** to sound, and is willing to work for it. That's admirable. I saw him most recently a few months ago, and the man can PLAY. (He also managed to pull out a Peavey Wolfgang on a couple of tunes without looking like an old fart trying to stay hip, and that's not easy.)
                          CONTAINS TRACE AMOUNTS OF ROCK AND COUNTRY. South Bound LaneHC 3.0 -- Making you miss HC 2.0

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by PFB


                            No doubt it was always really bad out there. I was a teen in the 80s. Almost everybody knew Motley Crue, Winger, or Ratt, when you told them that you liked Gary Moore, they had no idea who he was, he wasn't standard media-forced stuff.


                            This has always been true. Fabian (late '50s-early '60s) was essentially a cute boy with a haircut who could be sold to the teenie boppers. There have been short periods when what was popular was good, but it's a window that closes fast.



                            Originally posted by PFB

                            I think Frampton Comes Alive and Rumors created the idea it's all about selling the stuff in the late 70s. And perhaps the Record Companies will end up destroying themsleves, as they've spiraled downaward.


                            Again, it was true well before that. When the Beatles hit it big, record company execs landed on Liverpool like leeches on a piglet trying to find their own Beatles. When Jefferson Airplane made a record, anybody in San Francisco with a guitar and an acid glaze got a record deal. The whole Seattle thing was exactly the same.
                            Originally Posted by requiem156



                            I don't have to find something to dislike - it comes naturally.

                            Comment


                            • No music is good, we should all go deaf, all music is good, we live in a sterile white box........I win, I lose.
                              XT Brotherhood
                              I definitely suppourt our troops.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Frank Prince

                                John Fogerty also went back in the middle of his career, after he had written a lot of songs and made big bux, and took lessons from Supertramp guitarist and first-call session pro Carl Verheyen, so maybe he felt that attitude wasn't everything.


                                Well, the comparison's not really fair...I think had Kurt lived, there's a pretty good chance he would have done the same. His skills were improving toward the end...He played some solid guitar on the "Unplugged" performance...Nothing technically brilliant by any means, granted, but it was definitely a competent performance.

                                Also, Fogerty, as was pointed out, has always been a perfectionist. Not just in his post-CCR days...he was, as was pointed out, pretty much a tyrant about how his tunes should sound, even in Creedence. He let the other guys have a chance on "Mardi Gras"...Seeing how that one turned out, it's probably a good thing that he was a tyrant.

                                It's an apples/oranges comparison, imo, but much as I like Kurt (I was in high school at the time, and a lot of it's nostalgia, probably..."Teen Spirit" was the "Smoke on the Water" riff of my generation), I wouldn't put him in the same league as Fogerty. There are very few songwriters short of Dylan or Lennon/McCartney that I'd put on par with Fogerty though.

                                Steve
                                Pigpen said it was OK!







                                Originally Posted by mdog114


                                Boy, you should REALLY go back and slap you're teachers!

                                Comment



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