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John Scofield w/ John Mayer on Leno Tonight (Wed 15th)

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  • John Scofield w/ John Mayer on Leno Tonight (Wed 15th)

    Jazzman JOHN SCOFIELD, featuring JOHN MAYER, performs "I Don't Need No Doctor" from his latest, a disc full of Ray Charles' gems, That's What I Say

    Mayer is now in his element.

  • headless
    replied
    Originally posted by onewhiteduck
    John totally ripped.

    John, on the other hand, sucked it up big time.


    Ok, it's decided: onewhiteduck wins the thread.

    I came here to find out answers to my equipment questions, not to bash any fellow guitar players.

    Was that a SRV#1 JM was playing, or a Rory Gallahger?

    And what was that effect JS was using? At the very beginning there was a Slow-Attack effect, along with the ducklike EQ thingee. I thought he was using a guitar synth, but (in the limited time I was able to view the performance), I didn't see any hex-pickup on his guitar.

    Leave a comment:


  • deathhammer
    replied
    Originally posted by andrewjudah
    ...any thread with the name "Mayer" in the title, is bound to be at least 4 pages long... usualy more. Guitarists are a funny bread of know it alls.

    It's spelled "breed", ya "know it all"..... And it's "usually". Just yankin' your chain a bit.

    Leave a comment:


  • andrewjudah
    replied
    ...any thread with the name "Mayer" in the title, is bound to be at least 4 pages long... usualy more. Guitarists are a funny bread of know it alls.

    Leave a comment:


  • WulfmanJax
    replied
    Originally posted by Flamencology


    To be blunt, you wouldn't have been bored by the content had you understood it.

    That's a fair and most likely accurate assessment. I thought classical was boring for years too. I think i'll politely bow out of this discussion. I really haven't heard enough from the guitarists you've mentioned to farily compare them with Holdsworth anyway. I just thought you were a bit harsh on him.

    Leave a comment:


  • Flamencology
    replied
    Originally posted by WulfmanJax
    Most of what i've heard from Matheney has bored me to death.


    To be blunt, you wouldn't have been bored by the content had you understood it.

    I agree that the sound of the Pat Metheny Group can be generic, but the music itself is something else altogether, and comprises some of the most complex compisition in all of jazz... you'd spend exponentially more time trancribing The Way Up than you would Sixteen Men of Tain.

    His playing OUTSIDE of the PMG, which I can only presume that you haven't been exposed to (since the Weather Network/smooth jazz comment doesn't apply) is something else altogether...

    Look for examples in the next week or so in my Album of the Day threads.

    Leave a comment:


  • WulfmanJax
    replied
    Originally posted by Flamencology


    That said, saying that Holdsworth's albums are equal or better to Metheny's is like saying that Nazism was a good thing... it's a matter of opinion, but it's a ridiculous opinion to hold.
    Most of what i've heard from Matheney has bored me to death. I won't argue his ability, but, from everything i've heard from his, his music is the epitome of "elevator/weather channel" jazz. Perhaps you can give me some examples where i'm dead wrong on that. It's a possibility considering how long he's been around and how much music he's put out, so i'm opened to the possibility that what i heard wasn't a summation of his entire style.

    And i don't think it's a ridiculous opinion at all. Considering i dislike most jazz fusion yet love Metal Fatigue and most Holdsworth is a big "+1" for him. To me, he makes jazz with the attitude of rock and intensity of metal, which is something i've never heard a jazz guy do.

    Originally posted by Flamencology


    But in terms of 'pure guitar playing ability', for whatever that's worth, you're probably right.
    I would probably agree that his technical abilities eclipse his creative abilities as a composer and song-writer. Which, for me is usually a big red warning sign when it comes to guitarists. But, if you ask me his best moments are as good and amazing as almost any music i've ever heard. I think the Un-Merry Go Round is a great example of this. It's a song that puts me in such a great mood; much in the same way most Pink Floyd does. It's a mood that very few artists can set, and considering that Holdsworth is one of the few that can is another big "+1" for him.

    Leave a comment:


  • Flamencology
    replied
    Originally posted by WulfmanJax
    And "best album" is a completely subjective subject.


    Thanks, I really needed to have that pointed out for me.

    Subjectivity is not a concept I've come across in 16 years as a musician, 8 years as a thespian, 2 years as a student of dramatic and filmic literature, and close to 20 years as a human being.

    From now on, you have my permission to take for granted that EVERYTHING I say that is not a proven fact, IS my personal opinion.

    Feel better?

    That said, saying that Holdsworth's albums are equal or better to Metheny's is like saying that Nazism was a good thing... it's a matter of opinion, but it's a ridiculous opinion to hold.

    But in terms of 'pure guitar playing ability', for whatever that's worth, you're probably right.

    Leave a comment:


  • WulfmanJax
    replied
    Originally posted by Flamencology


    For my $, all else being equal...

    best guitarist = guitarist who cuts the best albums

    and Holdsworth has never made an album that ranks with the best of those I've mentioned
    And "best album" is a completely subjective subject. I'm sure there are as many people on here who would think that Metal Fatigue is as good or better than anything the other guitarists you mentioned ever did as there would be people (like you) disagreeing with that. But in terms of pure guitar playing ability, Holdsworth is definitely in the same league as those you mentioned. The music they make is probably too different to really compare, other than to say "i prefer his style over his".

    Leave a comment:


  • Flamencology
    replied
    Originally posted by WulfmanJax
    I'm not sure if there's any guitarist out there that can do what he does better than him... when you get into that kind of upper-echelon of guitar playing ability, it's nearly impossible to say "who's better" anymore.


    For my $, all else being equal...

    best guitarist = guitarist who cuts the best albums

    and Holdsworth has never made an album that ranks with the best of those I've mentioned

    Leave a comment:


  • WulfmanJax
    replied
    Originally posted by Flamencology


    Go back and read the post that I was addressing in the first place (59refin's).

    It's not fair to compare them... Holdsworth's not in the same league.

    It'd be like comparing The Rites of Spring to Le Nozze di Figaro.

    And what I meant by 'confrontational', was that just because something sounds bolder or more starkly original (Stravinsky), does not mean that it is any more unique (Mozart)...

    I would argue that Bill Frisell and Pat Metheny are more unique than even Holdsworth, but we wouldn't be having this discussion if it were them, because their uniqueness is more subtle.
    Fair enough. It's hard for me to compare considering i haven't heard Scofield. But i think Holdsworth is a good candidate for the best living guitarist in the world right now. To say he isn't in the same league with anyone is lunacy in my book. I'm not sure if there's any guitarist out there that can do what he does better than him. But i'm sure it's a fair assessment to say that he can't do alot of what the guitarists you mentioned do as well as they can either. Compare and contrast all day if you want, when you get into that kind of upper-echelon of guitar playing ability, it's nearly impossible to say "who's better" anymore.

    Leave a comment:


  • Flamencology
    replied
    Originally posted by WulfmanJax
    I can't compare as i haven't heard any Scofield.


    Go back and read the post that I was addressing in the first place (59refin's).

    It's not fair to compare them... Holdsworth's not in the same league.

    It'd be like comparing The Rites of Spring to Le Nozze di Figaro.

    And what I meant by 'confrontational', was that just because something sounds bolder or more starkly original (Stravinsky), does not mean that it is any more unique (Mozart)...

    I would argue that Bill Frisell and Pat Metheny are more unique than even Holdsworth, but we wouldn't be having this discussion if it were them, because their uniqueness is more subtle.

    Leave a comment:


  • WulfmanJax
    replied
    Originally posted by Flamencology


    That's in my current playlist.

    In this instance, we are comparing him to Scofield, who is every bit as much of an individualist, albeit in a much more eclectic and much less confrontational manner.
    I can't compare as i haven't heard any Scofield. I was just defending Holdsworth against (what i thought) was your unfair assessments of him. It seems unfair to bash artists for something they aren't trying to be. And what do you mean with "much less confrontational manner"?

    Leave a comment:


  • Flamencology
    replied
    Originally posted by WulfmanJax
    Listen to Sixteen Men of Tain...


    That's in my current playlist.

    In this instance, we are comparing him to Scofield, who is every bit as much of an individualist, albeit in a much more eclectic and much less confrontational manner.

    Leave a comment:


  • WulfmanJax
    replied
    Originally posted by Flamencology


    Key phrase was 'compared to Scofield'.

    ANYWAY, 'he/she could' is a pointless phrase... the only valid criteria for assessing an artist is the work that they DO produce, as compared to the work of others.

    And no, I don't think that there's that large a leap between Metal Fatigue and All Night Wrong, despite a period of almost 20 years between them... different seats, same game.
    But then how do you evaluate artists who are hell bent on carving out their own unique style? There was really nobody who sounded like Holdsworth before Holdsworth... who really do you have to compare him to?

    Listen to Sixteen Men of Tain... there's definitely a change, if perhaps not a huge amount of evolution.

    Leave a comment:













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