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How mechanically inclined are you?

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  • How mechanically inclined are you?

    Where do you "draw the line" in fixing stuf on your own vs. calling a professional. I'm not mechanically inclined at all. I can spend hours of frustration trying to fix something a pro could fix in minutes. I can do things like change light bulbs, fix a running toilet, mow the grass, change air filters, change smoke detectors, etc.

    I tried to fix my kitchen faucet (low water pressure) last weekend and spent the first half of the day on Saturday getting nowhere. I was able to take off the lines, the hot/cold handles, but couldn't figure out how to take the faucet. Water pressure is fine from the lines, it's just the faucet. When I went to run my dishwasher last night it turned on and didn't produce any water. I think it might be time to call a pro.

    For you guys that are more handy, was it always that way or did you learn along the way? I have gotten better, but I don't think I'll ever be Mr. Fixit.
    http://www.reverbnation.com/thedubiouscapture

  • #2
    I used to be an Aircraft tech. So very.
    Originally Posted by Tom Fucherheigen


    He is an adult now, but he is a child in the trousers.









    Originally Posted by clay sails


    This is essentially the same as married life, except that when you get married you share space with someone who washes your cum socks.

    Comment


    • #3
      Not very. Anything that requires more than a screwdriver and swearing gets the pro treatment.
      Do not write me for reasons of sass

      Comment


      • #4
        My skills outweigh the tools I have. So even if I know how to do something I take it to a pro because I don't have the resources to do it.
        http://www.last.fm/user/pinkfreudHC

        Comment


        • #5
          I'm adequate, but I don't get into things with natural gas connections.
          Originally Posted by requiem156



          I don't have to find something to dislike - it comes naturally.

          Comment


          • #6
            My skills outweigh the tools I have. So even if I know how to do something I take it to a pro because I don't have the resources to do it.


            This is the point that I've reached. I'll do anything that doesn't require me to buy $500 in one-use tools.
            I'm in a band called Little Sluggers. Signature.

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            • #7
              Not at all.

              Comment


              • #8
                Depending on where you live and the type well you have, if you lose water pressure, you can screw the cap off at the end of the facet, wash out the sand, screw it back on, and then it's fixed.
                [COLOR=#800080]
                [COLOR=#800080]At 13 my dad bought me and old 63 Ford van that I use to drive around on our property. If anything needed doing on it he told me to have at it and take my time. I learned mechanical, body work, and paint work on that van and worked for him as a mechanic through high school. I will note that working on stuff in the house is a lot different than working on an old car. I have a couple of home self improvement books I review before I tackle any home repair. Saves a hell of a lot of time and reduced the number of holes I punched through the walls by 100 percent.

                Where do you "draw the line" in fixing stuf on your own vs. calling a professional. I'm not mechanically inclined at all. I can spend hours of frustration trying to fix something a pro could fix in minutes. I can do things like change light bulbs, fix a running toilet, mow the grass, change air filters, change smoke detectors, etc.

                I tried to fix my kitchen faucet (low water pressure) last weekend and spent the first half of the day on Saturday getting nowhere. I was able to take off the lines, the hot/cold handles, but couldn't figure out how to take the faucet. Water pressure is fine from the lines, it's just the faucet. When I went to run my dishwasher last night it turned on and didn't produce any water. I think it might be time to call a pro.

                For you guys that are more handy, was it always that way or did you learn along the way? I have gotten better, but I don't think I'll ever be Mr. Fixit.

                Comment


                • #9
                  As a younger man, not at all.

                  Now, in my mid-40s, I'd say I'm above average.

                  - I taught myself to build amps & so home wiring wasn't a big leap. Anything on the user side of the breaker box is fair game.
                  - I'll tackle most plumbing where the parts are modular but prefer to leave copper joinery work to a pro.
                  - Rough woodworking (replacing facia, siding, & some framing) is no problem but I lack the tools & experience for most finish carpentry.

                  The best way to accumulate knowledge & confidence for this kind of stuff is to start simple, take on progressively larger tasks, read as much as you can (there are some great online tutorials), read the manuals/safety instructions of your tools, and know your limitations. Any that I have is the product of being a cheap SOB. A decade ago, when construction was booming, it was hard to get a pro to show up for any job under $1000. Times are different now but DIY will still save you money.

                  8 years ago, I saved $2500 by painting my own house w/my father-in-law's help. Now I'm getting quotes for 30-40% less for the same job and will seriously consider having a pro do it. I hate being up on that 40' ladder.

                  Regarding autos: I can change the oil. That is about it.
                  ____________________________________________
                  The Homebrews!http://home.bellsouth.net/p/PWP-rupertamp

                  "The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair." -Douglas Adams, Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

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                  • #10
                    I would say very.

                    From



                    To



                    New suspension, paint, brakes, lights. I am actually getting started on a CRX race car with a friend of mine soon. That is going to be wicked fun.
                    Originally Posted by eloydrummerboy


                    Crab_Cake is right









                    Originally Posted by sonik


                    Age would probably be a factor. I imagine the elderly and very young being much easier to tear into.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I do pretty much all my own work until it's something really major. Home repairs, car repairs, appliance repairs...you name it. Mostly because I'm a cheap bastard, but I have had instances where the pro's haven't done things quite right either.
                      I thought paper covered rock?
                      Nah, rock flies right through paper.
                      What beats rock?
                      Nothing beats rock.

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                      • #12


                        Mike, I did that and it did not help. My buddy recommended checking the water pressure directly from the line. We did this and the water pressure is great, so I am assuming it is something in the faucet that is clogging it. Of course after my buddy helped me the dishwasher is now not working (no water at all). Everyone at work said "did you check the line to make sure it is back on". I am pretty sure I checked, but I will double check when I get home.
                        http://www.reverbnation.com/thedubiouscapture

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          As a younger man, not at all.

                          Now, in my mid-40s, I'd say I'm above average.

                          - I taught myself to build amps & so home wiring wasn't a big leap. Anything on the user side of the breaker box is fair game.
                          - I'll tackle most plumbing where the parts are modular but prefer to leave copper joinery work to a pro.
                          - Rough woodworking (replacing facia, siding, & some framing) is no problem but I lack the tools & experience for most finish carpentry.

                          The best way to accumulate knowledge & confidence for this kind of stuff is to start simple, take on progressively larger tasks, read as much as you can (there are some great online tutorials), read the manuals/safety instructions of your tools, and know your limitations. Any that I have is the product of being a cheap SOB. A decade ago, when construction was booming, it was hard to get a pro to show up for any job under $1000. Times are different now but DIY will still save you money.

                          8 years ago, I saved $2500 by painting my own house w/my father-in-law's help. Now I'm getting quotes for 30-40% less for the same job and will seriously consider having a pro do it. I hate being up on that 40' ladder.

                          Regarding autos: I can change the oil. That is about it.


                          I'm hoping with time I get better. Unfortunately, most tasks that I need to be completed need to be done and aren't really upgrades. I have done some painting and that's no big deal other than being time consuming and your arms getting a little stiff/sore.

                          My garbage disposal needs to be replaced.. that would probably be a simple tasks I could actually do.
                          http://www.reverbnation.com/thedubiouscapture

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I'm an excellent carpenter, but that's not really mechanical.

                            Beyond that, my skills are essentially limited to what's useful in the theatre and in sailing... which can be very intensive, but also too specific to be practical in home life. I'm ****************ing useless when it comes to motor vehicles. But I can design and build a mechanical stage on which a car will rotate, or I make a motorcycle fly using airline cable, rigging, counterweights, etc.

                            In conjunction with carpentry (and I say "carpentry" in the theatrical sense of the term, meaning that I can also work with metals, plastics, etc.), this probably means that I'd be most effective at building mechanical things like wagons, windmills, and catapults.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I know a little bit about a lot. Plumbing, electrical, piping, heating/cooling, car stuff, carpentry etc.

                              At the least I can usually figure out what is wrong, even if I can't fix it.
                              SUPER EVIL INDUSTRIES
                              SUPER EVIL FORUMS
                              Facebook ~ sonik777@hotmail.com
                              "Every normal man must be tempted, at times, to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin slitting throats."






                              Originally Posted by Jimmy James


                              I have the gift of musical tolerance.

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