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  • Minor guitar questions

    Thought it'd be worth starting a topic for minor questions that don't need to occupy an entire thread, I have a few myself.



    When the word 'junior' is in a guitar's name, for example the Epiphone Les Paul junior, does it mean that the size is smaller, or that it's for beginners, or what? Thanks.

  • #2
    It generally means the guitar only has one pickup, in the bridge position.
    The Common Sense Mets Fan

    There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there always has been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge." - Isaac Asimov, Newsweek (21 January 1980)

    Comment


    • #3
      It generally means the guitar only has one pickup, in the bridge position.
      The Common Sense Mets Fan

      There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there always has been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge." - Isaac Asimov, Newsweek (21 January 1980)

      Comment


      • #4
        The junior in the Gibson/Epiphone line up were inexpensive 'student' oriented guitars. They were/are stripped down of features to keep costs low.



        Many of these are excellent guitars, and lots of great Les Paul juniors are out there....and they command significant coin from collectors. Tons of amazing records were made using these 'entry level' guitars.



        The size of the body might be thinner and somewhat smaller in size (to save wood costs, I guess), but the SCALE of these guitars (length from bridge to nut) is the same as a normal Les Paul (24.75", if I recall correctly). So, they play and feel like a normal guitar.

        Comment


        • #5
          The junior in the Gibson/Epiphone line up were inexpensive 'student' oriented guitars. They were/are stripped down of features to keep costs low.



          Many of these are excellent guitars, and lots of great Les Paul juniors are out there....and they command significant coin from collectors. Tons of amazing records were made using these 'entry level' guitars.



          The size of the body might be thinner and somewhat smaller in size (to save wood costs, I guess), but the SCALE of these guitars (length from bridge to nut) is the same as a normal Les Paul (24.75", if I recall correctly). So, they play and feel like a normal guitar.

          Comment


          • #6






            Quote Originally Posted by Help!I'maRock!
            View Post

            It generally means the guitar only has one pickup, in the bridge position.




            And what's a pickup? A slot where you can plug in an amp?









            Quote Originally Posted by tiltsta
            View Post

            The junior in the Gibson/Epiphone line up were inexpensive 'student' oriented guitars. They were/are stripped down of features to keep costs low.



            Many of these are excellent guitars, and lots of great Les Paul juniors are out there....and they command significant coin from collectors. Tons of amazing records were made using these 'entry level' guitars.



            The size of the body might be thinner and somewhat smaller in size (to save wood costs, I guess), but the SCALE of these guitars (length from bridge to nut) is the same as a normal Les Paul (24.75", if I recall correctly). So, they play and feel like a normal guitar.




            Ah, so it refers to less features basically. Does it still contain the features of other guitars in their price range though?

            Comment


            • #7






              Quote Originally Posted by Help!I'maRock!
              View Post

              It generally means the guitar only has one pickup, in the bridge position.




              And what's a pickup? A slot where you can plug in an amp?









              Quote Originally Posted by tiltsta
              View Post

              The junior in the Gibson/Epiphone line up were inexpensive 'student' oriented guitars. They were/are stripped down of features to keep costs low.



              Many of these are excellent guitars, and lots of great Les Paul juniors are out there....and they command significant coin from collectors. Tons of amazing records were made using these 'entry level' guitars.



              The size of the body might be thinner and somewhat smaller in size (to save wood costs, I guess), but the SCALE of these guitars (length from bridge to nut) is the same as a normal Les Paul (24.75", if I recall correctly). So, they play and feel like a normal guitar.




              Ah, so it refers to less features basically. Does it still contain the features of other guitars in their price range though?

              Comment


              • #8
                A pickup is the magnet/wire coil that picks up the vibration of the string and produces an electrical signal that can then be sent to an amplifier.



                Juniors were originally a low feature guitar to let students get a good instrument without all the 'bling' of the upper end models. They have sort of evolved into their own thing over the last 50 years. I wouldn't consider a Gibson Les Paul junior to be less of a real guitar than a Les Paul standard, but rather a different type of guitar with a different sound. They are still inexpensive compared to the upper end models, but they are fully functional guitars you could take on a world tour, record an album, etc. Oddly enough, Gibson makes custom shop Les Paul juniors that cost more than the production line Les Paul Standard.



                Like this junior....



                http://www.musiciansfriend.com/guita...lectric-guitar



                compared to this Les Paul standard.



                http://www.musiciansfriend.com/guita...lectric-guitar

                Comment


                • #9
                  A pickup is the magnet/wire coil that picks up the vibration of the string and produces an electrical signal that can then be sent to an amplifier.



                  Juniors were originally a low feature guitar to let students get a good instrument without all the 'bling' of the upper end models. They have sort of evolved into their own thing over the last 50 years. I wouldn't consider a Gibson Les Paul junior to be less of a real guitar than a Les Paul standard, but rather a different type of guitar with a different sound. They are still inexpensive compared to the upper end models, but they are fully functional guitars you could take on a world tour, record an album, etc. Oddly enough, Gibson makes custom shop Les Paul juniors that cost more than the production line Les Paul Standard.



                  Like this junior....



                  http://www.musiciansfriend.com/guita...lectric-guitar



                  compared to this Les Paul standard.



                  http://www.musiciansfriend.com/guita...lectric-guitar

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks.



                    So different guitar, different sound, different features? Do they still have somewhat the same features that other guitars around their price have?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks.



                      So different guitar, different sound, different features? Do they still have somewhat the same features that other guitars around their price have?

                      Comment


                      • #12






                        Quote Originally Posted by Ashir
                        View Post

                        Thanks.



                        So different guitar, different sound, different features? Do they still have somewhat the same features that other guitars around their price have?




                        Hard question to answer. In simple terms, I guess I would say yes, compared to other entry level instruments, the junior models are similar in features. Of course, this gets into a big debate about prices of guitars, where they are made, and what components are used to make them. A lot of personal preference comes into this as well. An epiphone les paul junior is a very different animal from a Squier Classic Vibe stratocaster, even though they cost about the same.

                        Comment


                        • #13






                          Quote Originally Posted by Ashir
                          View Post

                          Thanks.



                          So different guitar, different sound, different features? Do they still have somewhat the same features that other guitars around their price have?




                          Hard question to answer. In simple terms, I guess I would say yes, compared to other entry level instruments, the junior models are similar in features. Of course, this gets into a big debate about prices of guitars, where they are made, and what components are used to make them. A lot of personal preference comes into this as well. An epiphone les paul junior is a very different animal from a Squier Classic Vibe stratocaster, even though they cost about the same.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Got it, thanks. So can you give me a few examples of features most junior models lack compared to the genuine guitar?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Got it, thanks. So can you give me a few examples of features most junior models lack compared to the genuine guitar?

                              Comment



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