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Skits vs. Sketches! What's the deal? Are they the same thing? I think not!

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  • Skits vs. Sketches! What's the deal? Are they the same thing? I think not!

    OK to me a sketch is a rough drawing of something, usually in pencil while a skit is a short play or improv like what you see on SNL. But yet I constantly here people use these terms interchangeably. Technically maybe they are but to me a skit is a skit and a sketch is a sketch. A quick check of dictionary.com seems to pretty much support my premise. Have you noticed this? Does it bother you? Am I completely off base here???
    Should I just forget about it and move on? Not sure if I can...TGIF!!!

  • #2
    If I am to be believed (and why not?!), a "skit" refers to, as you said, a short comedy piece or the like, while a "sketch" can refer to either a brief comedy piece OR a rough drawing, depending on context.

    Comment


    • #3
      If I am to be believed (any why not?!), a "skit" refers to, as you said, a short comedy piece or the like, while a "sketch" can refer to either a brief comedy piece OR a rough drawing, depending on context.


      Why does "sketch" get such preferential treatment! Not amused!!

      Comment


      • #4
        A sketch has multiple meanings, a skit has one. Referring to a comedy sketch is absolutely standard. I haven't researched it but I assume 'comedy sketch' predates 'comedy skit'.
        Originally Posted by Calum


        Is she cuddling a dirty swan?









        Originally Posted by vikingrat


        The world doesn't need a new generation of hippies.

        Comment


        • #5
          The "short play" definition doesn't appear under "sketch" until #5. So I think for accuracy's sake and my own peace of mind we should all use these terms correctly from now on m'kay? Thanks....(or maybe I'm just still dizzy from having traveled back from 1863 yesterday... time travel ****************s with your mind!)

          skit
          ? ?[skit] Show IPA
          noun
          1.
          a short literary piece of a humorous or satirical character.
          2.
          a short theatrical sketch or act, usually comical.
          3.
          a gibe or taunt.

          sketch
          ? ?[skech] Show IPA
          noun
          1.
          a simply or hastily executed drawing or painting, especially a preliminary one, giving the essential features without the details.
          2.
          a rough design, plan, or draft, as of a book.
          3.
          a brief or hasty outline of facts, occurrences, etc.: a sketch of his life.
          4.
          a short, usually descriptive, essay, history, or story.
          5.
          a short play or slight dramatic performance, as one forming part of a vaudeville program.

          Comment


          • #6
            Show IPA
            noun
            1.
            a simply or hastily executed drawing or painting, especially a preliminary one, giving the essential features without the details.
            2.
            a rough design, plan, or draft, as of a book.
            3.
            a brief or hasty outline of facts, occurrences, etc.: a sketch of his life.
            4.
            a short, usually descriptive, essay, history, or story.
            5.
            a short play or slight dramatic performance, as one forming part of a vaudeville program.


            What does the order of definition matter?

            Think of it this way: what does a 'sketch' mean? It's a simplified, less detailed version of something. A comedy 'sketch' was a short scene, not a full comedy in the drama sense. A Midsummer's Night's Dream is a comedy, a short comedy scene enacted on the stage is a sketch. There's your origin.

            A 'skit' sounds like slang for 'sketch'. I think you've got things ass-backwards.
            Originally Posted by Calum


            Is she cuddling a dirty swan?









            Originally Posted by vikingrat


            The world doesn't need a new generation of hippies.

            Comment


            • #7
              As a child, I performed in skits.

              As an adult, I perform in sketches.

              Comment


              • #8
                The two are synonymous, except to sketch comics, who regard "skit" as pertaining to the amateurish/hackneyed/childish/unsophisticated.

                Comment


                • El Glom-o
                  El Glom-o commented
                  Editing a comment

                  Flamencology wrote:
                  The two are synonymous, except to sketch comics, who regard "skit" as pertaining to the amateurish/hackneyed/childish/unsophisticated.

                  In books I've read about "Saturday Night Live", the SNL writers and cast made the distinction that they did "sketches", while "skits" were performed on "The Carol Burnette Show". 


              • #9
                What does the order of definition matter?
                Seriously? Like why does 1 come before 5? Hopefully an answer to that is not required. I'll stick with the dictionary over Motorik for now anyway...

                Comment


                • reverendflash
                  reverendflash commented
                  Editing a comment

                  Mav64 wrote:
                  What does the order of definition matter?
                  Seriously? Like why does 1 come before 5? Hopefully an answer to that is not required. I'll stick with the dictionary over Motorik for now anyway...


                  Sounds like you can't grasp why that was a valid question.
                  The definition ranking system simply sequences the word's different usages as they compare to each other in terms of frequency of use. The 5th-place ranking of the use of 'sketch' as a way to describe a short play might rank less than the four more popular meanings, but that doesn't mean that it is less used to describe a short play than 'skit'. All it means is that 'skit' is a word with far fewer meanings than 'sketch'. It doesn't mean that 'sketch' is used less often than 'skit' to describe a short play.
                  For instance, let's take a different word: 'stretch'. The act of stretching in conjunction with yawning (to relieve stiffness after resting in one position for a long time) is also called 'pandiculation'. That defiintion is the number one (and only) definition of the word 'pandiculation'. However, the word 'stretch' actually has multiple definitions. The definition which is synonymous with 'pandiculate' is NOT (depending on your dictionary of choice) going to be the number one definition of 'stretch'. Using your logic, 'pandiculate' would be the most common way to describe that physical act.
                  But of course, you can see where that would not be correct.
                  Using the lesser-ranked application of the word 'stretch' to represent that act is STILL more common than using 'pandiculate', despite the latter term's exclusive association with that definition.



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