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Do you like this guitar and is it worth $1400?

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  • Do you like this guitar and is it worth $1400?

    wah! I had to click three times! wah!

    1966 Fender Coronado II, (front), (side), (headstock), (back), (features), (neckplate), (case).  A very untraditional guitar from Fender and probably their first real attempt (not counting the solidbody Jazzmaster) to get some of that Gibson business.  For around 15 years Fender had owned the solidbody market; Gibson the archtops.  With the advent of the British invasion, hollowbodies were gaining huge visibility, especially with the Beatles and their Epi Casinos.  Fender brought onboard German-born Roger Rossmeisl, of Rickenbacker fame, noted for using a German carve on hollowbody instruments.  You can see Rick influences in the checkered binding, and F-tailpiece.  The Coronado was a true hollow-bodied electric guitar, like the Gibson ES-330 and Epiphone Casino, without a center wood block in the body, as opposed to a 335-style "semi-hollowbody" that had a block of wood anchoring the top and back, running the length of the body.  A full hollowbody has one drawback, specifically being more prone to feedback than a semi-hollow.  On the up side, they body is more free to vibrate and they can have excellent acoustic properties, including better sustain.  It came in 4 models (plus some Wildwood models that followed) which included the "I" single pickup, "II", dual pickup, "XII" 12-sting, and bass.  I know I'll get questions regarding the serial number, "hey, 500,000s are for the 70's...", but just google Coronado serials and you'll see that there were a large run of '65/'66 Coronado's in the 50XXXX range.  This is an early model Coronado, characterized by checkered binding and chrome top pickups.  These single coil pickups were made by DeArmond, a company more famous for Gretsch pickups.  The bridge was a free-floating, non anchored, 'tune-o-matic' style bridge with a rosewood base, and it also has a suspended "F" tailpiece. The maple arched body is bound in checkered binding.  Other features include a large gold pickups bolt-on neck is bound and features a rosewood fretboard and large block inlays, dual F-holes are bound, headstock is black with a gold Trans logo, controls are dual volume and tone controls with chrome-top black knobs, with a 3-way switch on the upper treble bout, tuners are the common F-tuners, and it has a single string tree.  Perhaps the most visible use of the Coronado was by the decade's biggest star, Elvis Presley, as the only guitar featured in the movie "Speedway", which was a sunburst model (shown here), just like this one.  More serious users have included Dave Davies of The Kinks, Wayne Newton, Sergio Pizzorno of Kasabian, Graham Coxon of Blur, Jimmie Vaughan, and the Flaming Lips.  This guitar has been played sparingly in its 47 years and is in beautiful condition and 100\% original.  It plays beautifully and has a pleasing tone that isn't prone to feedback at reasonable gain levels.  Includes original case by Victoria Luggage company and in this condition is an excellent value for the player or collector at $1399.  

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    www.kingsofthedrink.com







    Originally Posted by Prages


    I think everyone in the world has been lonely at some point in their life...and most of them could have probably written a more betterest song about it.









    Originally Posted by tiger roach


    Once my mom told me not to go outside because there was a bird fight going on. I thought, "Bird fight, WTF? She can't really think I would fall for that crap." So I went outside anyway and a bird pecked me on the head.









    Originally Posted by gennation


    Negatory, even dressed as a man I'm more of a man than you.

  • #2
    The bridge pickup is unusable and they feed back like crazy. No thanks. They certainly are increasing in value though.
    CONTAINS TRACE AMOUNTS OF ROCK AND COUNTRY. South Bound LaneHC 3.0 -- Making you miss HC 2.0

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  • #3
    Kind of and maybe
    .

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    • AstroZon
      AstroZon commented
      Editing a comment

      Years ago, like in the late 70s, a friend of mine had an old Fender Coronado like that one,  It had a cool janky sound much like a Jazzmaster, however, it wouldn't stay in tune for over 3 minutes.  And like others have said, it would feed back like mad (we even filled it with socks and it still fed back.) He finally traded it toward a Yamaha SG800 from a local music store.  That was a pretty good guitar - especially for the small club gigging that we were doing.

      It's worth $1400 to a collector, but not to a gigging musician.  A Casino would be a much better alternative.  

       

            


  • #4
    No, yes unfortunately.
    The Common Sense Mets Fan

    There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there always has been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge." - Isaac Asimov, Newsweek (21 January 1980)

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    • rsadasiv
      rsadasiv commented
      Editing a comment

      No and prices for vintage semi-hollowbodies are insane these days, so maybe.


  • #5

    Only know one person who played one for years in a popular local 60s cover band.
    I always thought it was kinda cool and different, but I've never played one. It worked for him tho. As a player I'm on the fence.

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    • EddietheCartboy
      EddietheCartboy commented
      Editing a comment

      Pine Apple Slim wrote:

      Only know one person who played one for years in a popular local 60s cover band.
      I always thought it was kinda cool and different, but I've never played one. It worked for him tho. As a player I'm on the fence.



      I knew a guy back in the '70's that had one....it "worked for him" as well--it had a ridiculously high book value in the pawnshops at the time, so he pawned it regularly for pot money, always secure in the knowlege that it'd still be in the shop when he had enough money to get it out of hock.


  • #6

    Played one. It worked for him tho. As a player I'm on the fence.

    edit: how do you dele a post?

     

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