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  • New Guitarist, seeking advice, also, first post :)

    I've played piano for quite a few years, so I understand the theory. I got her a week ago, and I'm hooked haha. I've been playing 6-12 hours each day, learning chords, scales, etc. 

    My question is, how do I go about eventually becoming a great improv guitarist? I don't know how, but I can already improv surprisingly well, and I want to hone this skill. So, I've spent most of this week just learning Em Pentatonic scale, putting emotion, color, and a mental image for the scale, to truly know it so I can easily pick it out, and then I'll move on to Am, but other than time, and patience I'm not sure of how to reach my goal. I plan on playing 8+ hours a day to get as good add quickly add I can, so I can fully express myself on guitar, and I have always wanted to do music for a living, so if you can give me any advice, tips, anything that will help I'd be more than grateful.

    I apologize for rambling of topic so much, just wanted to be thorough haha, first post, awe yeah! 

     


  • #2
    *bump* *nudge* Haha, not one person has tips on how to play guitar, on a guitar website? Someone help a noobie out!

    Comment


    • Calum
      Calum commented
      Editing a comment

      I dunno. Practice less?


  • #3

    Learn as many scales and chords as you can, work on your sense of rhythm, practice with a metronome, transcribe solos (on guitar and other instruments) so you aquire a vocabulary, work on your sense of rhythm, learn songs so you aquire a repertoire, play with other people, work on your sense of rhythm, work on your sense of rhythm, practice with backing tracks, play along with CDs and/or iTunes on shuffle and/or the radio so you become able to quickly pick out the key of a piece of music, work on your sense of rhythm, record your own playing and be honest to yourself about how much you suck, work on your sense of rhythm, listen attentively to your own playing while you're playing, practice phrasing in different subdivisions of the beat, listen to lots of music, listen to different kinds of music, and work on your sense of rhythm.

    Welcome to the forum!

    Comment


    • Music Is All
      Music Is All commented
      Editing a comment

      @Phlat Phive, that was definitely helpful, absolutely helped, and I've never thought of recording...hmmm, definitely worth a shot!


  • #4

    I think everyone who gets good starts by imitating the music they like.  What music has inspired you to want to play an instrument?  That would be a good place to start.... learn how to play it.  As you continue your sphere of influences will widen and if you keep playing your ear, technique, and everything else should follow. 

    Basically, you just have to keep hitting the thing until you start getting sounds out of it you like.  The more you put into it the more you will get out of it. 

    Have fun!

    http://www.reverbnation.com/thedubiouscapture

    Comment


    • #5

      Carl Veryheyen says when improvising 30% of one's playing is actually improvised, while 70% is stock/fall back licks a musician has accumulated over the years.  I'm not sure if he heard that from somewhere else or came up with it, but I think it's something that really rings true.  Maybe the percentage is different for some guys, but when it comes down to it most great musicians can be identified when they play.  Why is this?  It's because they sound like themselves.  Tone and phrasing has a lot to due with it. 

      Just something to think about. 

      From the start you need to start stringing your ideas together in a way that sounds musical.  What's the point of having 100 licks that sound like ****?  You can do this by playing along to backing tracks, a metronome, or (best of all) with other musicians. 

      Carl Verheyen's quote just popped into my head and I kind of rambled... but the guy knows what he is talking about. 

      http://www.reverbnation.com/thedubiouscapture

      Comment


      • DdBob
        DdBob commented
        Editing a comment

        smoke a lot of weed


    • #6
      Haha, thanks so much. Great advice from everyone, and I'm definitely glad I've found this forum!

      Comment


      • rickenvox
        rickenvox commented
        Editing a comment
        what guitarists do you like? You need something to aspire to.

    • #7
      I definitely aspire to be as good as Michael Hedges, Joe Satriani, players like that. Whose gennation?

      Comment


      • Jimmy James
        Jimmy James commented
        Editing a comment

        Music Is All wrote:
        I definitely aspire to be as good as Michael Hedges, Joe Satriani, players like that. Whose gennation?

        Gennation is a golden God.  He speaks, we listen.


    • #8

      If you've played piano for years, you're already familliar with scale/chord relationships.  Mechanics is going to be your biggest initial hurdle.  Pick up Petrucci's "Wild Stringdom" which has some excellent exercises for developing precision & dexterity on guitar.  Google it & you'll find excerpts.

      Use a metronome.

      Start slow, play precisely.  Don't speed up until your execution is near perfect.

      6-12 hours a day of practice is terrific but not if your method & technique are poor.  Find a good teacher & get some lessons that focus on technique/mechanics.

      The best improvisers I've known understand chord theory inside & out.

      Ditto on learning horn lines, vocal lines, keyboard parts, etc. (edit: Learn all the non-guitar parts you can handle.)

       

      ____________________________________________
      The Homebrews!http://home.bellsouth.net/p/PWP-rupertamp

      "The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair." -Douglas Adams, Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

      Comment


      • #9
        A golden God haha, I'm gonna have to meet him then. Yeah, definitely need a teacher, but why is everyone saying that learning horn sections in songs are detrimental to improv?

        Comment


        • 335clone
          335clone commented
          Editing a comment

          Music Is All wrote:
          A golden God haha, I'm gonna have to meet him then. Yeah, definitely need a teacher, but why is everyone saying that learning horn sections in songs are detrimental to improv?

          That's exactly opposite of what was said.

           

          Put some space in your lines, it's as much about what you don't play as what you do play. Make the notes count, and eliminate the extraneous notes.

           

           


      • #10
        Do you know of any books that teach chord theory would be taught in? I finished learning e minor pent, and can improvise all over the entire fretboard, it sounds actually pretty good, but I want to know as many chord progressions as possible so I can move easily in and out with chords and scales from one scale to another, every where on the fretboard. Also, any tips on making chords now that I know where the notes are? I can improv, but not with chords, just single notes. I know chords, but only at one part of the fretboard haha.

        Comment


        • Calum
          Calum commented
          Editing a comment

          I've found this book pretty useful for chords and chord p

           

           

           

          rojassgressions.

           

           

          Attached Files

        • Phlat Phive
          Phlat Phive commented
          Editing a comment

          Music Is All wrote:
          Do you know of any books that teach chord theory would be taught in? I finished learning e minor pent, and can improvise all over the entire fretboard, it sounds actually pretty good, but I want to know as many chord progressions as possible so I can move easily in and out with chords and scales from one scale to another, every where on the fretboard. Also, any tips on making chords now that I know where the notes are? I can improv, but not with chords, just single notes. I know chords, but only at one part of the fretboard haha.

          One approach is learn chord shapes from the outside; i.e. just learning where to put your fingers. Doing this in the form of chord progressions (preferably within songs) is helpful because you can put them in context.

          The other approach: Since you said you know theory, I'm assuming you know how chords are built (triads, seventh chords, etc). I would suggest you learn the major scale on the fretboard, inside and out, and from there it's a small step to building arpeggios within a major tonality. You can learn a lot about how intervals are spaced out on the fretboard this way, and from there you can build any chord you want.

          Simple example:

          Learn a pattern for a C major scale, over all six strings. Now take that scale and play only the root and the 3rd, 5th, and 7th intervals (in all instances where they occur in the scale pattern): You've just played a Cmaj7 arpeggio. This tells you where on the fretboard the root and the 3rd, 5th and 7th intervals are. Combine them in voicings that make sense with the number of fingers you have and how far you can stretch them, and you should be able to find several different voicings of a Cmaj7 chord.

          Edit: I would recommend you use both approaches, the first to acquire a vocabulary of chords quickly, the second to make sense of what you're doing. And I don't offhand know of any good books, sorry (getting a teacher who can show you this kind of stuff in person would definitely help, more than a book I would say).













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