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  • How do you warm up?

    I am curious how you guys are all warming up for your practise routine?

    Here is my philosophy on getting warmed up:
    I my opinion the most important thing to pay attention to while doing your warm-up is to FULLY engage your mind!

    Let me explain that to you:
    Whenever you start to warm up you need to get your fingers warm and smooth to play more accurate and faster. That is the part most players understand.

    But your Bain also needs to get engaged and here is why:
    If you don't engage your brain during the warm up you will "loose" a lot of precious practise time (YES you will loose the time to improve as a player, because playing a scale mindless up and down has absolutely NO benefit for your guitar playing!)

    So you will actually improve your guitar skills during the warm up and therefore make your guitar routine much more efficient when you start to engage your mind.

    How should you do that?
    It actually doesn't matter what you are playing as long as it is challanging for your BRAIN.
    For example play a scale you know but play a sequence of thirds instead of simply play the scale up and down.
    Once you are getting familiar with that adopt the idea to another scale or simply change the pattern. There are endlesspossibilitys to that.

    You will also get more creative and it is a lot of fun - right away even in the warm up

    So what's your favourite routine or how do you warm up? Let me know

    Cheers,

    Matthias

  • #2
    I bought Transcribe! a couple years, maybe more ago just to have a slowdowner that would export wav and mp3. Since then I've progressed (?) to ever slower tempi. Down to 10% original in a few cases. Anyway I've gotten better and better at real slow; no more headaches, glazed eyes, the usual hazards. Sight reading is a joke ( not really). But the gist is I can do slow AND attentive now and THAT'S my warm up.
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    • #3
      Originally posted by 1001gear View Post
      I bought Transcribe! a couple years, maybe more ago just to have a slowdowner that would export wav and mp3. Since then I've progressed (?) to ever slower tempi. Down to 10% original in a few cases. Anyway I've gotten better and better at real slow; no more headaches, glazed eyes, the usual hazards. Sight reading is a joke ( not really). But the gist is I can do slow AND attentive now and THAT'S my warm up.
      Sound interesting! Maybe i shoud give it a try...do you know if there is a free trial version of transcribe?

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      • #4
        Yeah, 30 days free. I bought mine after a few hours use lol.
        https://www.seventhstring.com/xscribe/overview.html
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        • #5
          Originally posted by 1001gear View Post
          Yeah, 30 days free. I bought mine after a few hours use lol.
          https://www.seventhstring.com/xscribe/overview.html
          Thanks man! Gonna check it out right now

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          • #6
            Hope it works for you.
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            • #7
              Originally posted by 1001gear View Post
              Hope it works for you.
              I just gave it a try - it DOES work!! Thanks a lot!

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              • #8
                Cool. Once you get the hang of "slow" you can zero in on the hangups; invent your own drills. I use it mostly to play through changes that would otherwise go by too fast to learn anything, but the benefits reach into all aspects of musicianship.
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                • #9
                  I constantly use a Varigrip in my free time and when I get my hands I do arpeggios, speed picking, Allan Holdsworth style legato playing, string skipping, fast chord changes and just get my mind get in the mood to go to places that it has never gone before.
                  How many guitarists does it take to screw in a lightbulb ? Five , one to screw it in , hit the switch and four to sit around bragging how much better they could have done it !!!! 😱👹😲

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by AJ6stringsting View Post
                    I constantly use a Varigrip in my free time and when I get my hands I do arpeggios, speed picking, Allan Holdsworth style legato playing, string skipping, fast chord changes and just get my mind get in the mood to go to places that it has never gone before.
                    So you are warming up without your guitar with the Varigrip and then go to the guitar and play?

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                    • AJ6stringsting
                      AJ6stringsting commented
                      Editing a comment
                      During breaks at work , going to and from, here and there.
                      The type of music I play, you have to keep in shape. Fingers and tendons have to sync with the mind.

                  • #11
                    Just play. Gong all cerebral about it hurts my fretboard.
                    “There is nothing which I dread so much as a division of the republic into two great parties, each arranged under its leader, and concerting measures in opposition to each other. This, in my humble apprehension, is to be dreaded as the greatest political evil under our Constitution.”
                    John Adams, The Works Of John Adams, Second President Of The United States

                    _____________________
                    “The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace in a continual state of alarm (and hence clamorous to be led to safety) by menacing them with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary.”
                    H.L. Mencken

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                    • #12
                      If I only have a short time to get ready to go onstage I will play a chromatic scale using four notes per string. I usually start on the fifth fret of the sixth string, The fifth note of the chromatic scale would then be on the fourth fret of the fifth string so playing this scale includes a small stretch.

                      I understand the OP's premise of engaging the brain but, in my case, sometimes it's important that I quickly get past the stiffness or my fingers won't allow me to do what the music wants me to do.
                      As a human being, you come with the whole range of inner possibilities
                      from the deepest hell to the highest states.

                      It is up to you which one you choose to explore
                      .

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                      • #13
                        On practical rehearsal, I'm a drummer. I go through the warm up process and over a period of hours indulge and eliminate all the lust/horniness so at showtime I can bot through whatever comes up.
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                        • #14
                          onelife Well that makes sense for the preparation on stage to get your fingers warm quickly, but do you also warm up like this during your practise routine?

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                          • #15
                            I crack my knuckles

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