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Waging Heavy Peace by Neil Young

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  • Waging Heavy Peace by Neil Young

    Devoured it in 2 days. Impressions? Needs more barn...

    I liked the flow, very much a remembrance not overtly researched with ridiculous details.

    Neil is trying to change himself into a better man, on his own terms - this book is part of that process. I commend him for attempting something out of his comfort zone. I also commend him for going out of his way to inform history of all the men and women who helped make those great records he did. He readily and constantly is tipping his cap to the many mates, alive and now gone, for their efforts on his behalf. He knows it was a lot of people who did not see the bright lights or big money who helped make his career the enduring legacy it has become. He is humbled by his friends' assistance, and feels an enduring gratitude to them. It is clear he wanted to set that record straight.



    It is not a great book, however.



    The PlayTone aspect, while I 100% agree with the book's sponsor's goal, its overt presence throughout undercuts a 60+ year in the making tale. It is curious how much of the distant past haunts him. The Squires are discussed at great length, throughout the book. I have heard "The Sultan" single myself: They were not a great band, okay. Topango Canyon is huge in the book. I have been there. Must be me. Much of the past discussed is told almost as if his recollection is impressionistic and/or dreamlike, which, as a pot smoker for 40 years (now clean), must have been hard for him. The inability to recreate seminal moments had to be extremely disturbing to him, yet he never seems to note it. Perhaps I read things that aren't truly there. I do that. His says the 'past is the past, nothing to be done'. Yet he is writing an autobiography...



    There are sentences & paragraphs, such as the one on the inner liner jacket, which are really lovely sentences conveying great insight. The man is able to express his linkages to the world around him in a way the really does harken back to an alternative era - the hippie dream. Well, I should say, the fallacy of the hippie dream or the hopes of the hippie dream. I have always felt that the essential ethos of the hippie dream cannot sustain itself, nor can or could it survive once focus was brought to bear on the wonderfulness of the dream. Like a great and haunting melody, the more you look and talk about it, the less it is transcendent. That has always been, and remains, one of the greatest shames of any small pocket of mirth - too many people in paradise, pretty soon you have just another Stockton.



    I enjoyed the read. His talks and ruminations about song writing are fascinating. Neil is a bit of a gear head if you didn't know (really?) but he doesn't get into too much here. They are secrets I suspect, like those old echo chambers in LA, now lost to a flat digital reality, brutal and harsh to the ears. I hope he succeeds with Pono. I want to buy one very much, maybe 4. I would love for his Lincvolt to happen. Man, that would be something. It is admirable that Neil has such....a desire to make the world a better place these days. He restates many times that change is always going on, and we live in exciting times indeed. He is very modern for someone who is near 70.



    "Be great, or be gone." David ****************ing Briggs. A man I'd have loved to hang with, if just for an hour.



    He does not discuss his mother one iota, which is really very very shocking. I don't know what that is about. I do know she was a bit of a pill from "Shakey", very opinionated and abrasive at times. Sounds like they were a bit too much alike? Maybe he just isn't ready to take that corner just yet.



    The book reconfirmed that Neil is a real icon to me, has been since I bought "EKTIN" and "ATGR" all those decades ago (on vinyl - you kids have no idea what you left behind there, it's just so sad.)

  • #2
    Neil is my boy. He's never been anybody's puppet. He does what he wants. Sometimes he swings for the fence and strikes out. That's OK. Sometimes he hits the sweet spot.
    http://2.media.collegehumor.cvcdn.co...freaks-out.gif

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    • #3
      Excellent review, T. Thanks.

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      • #4
        That was such a great review, I feel like I don't even need to read it now.
        (Everybody knows this is nowhere)

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        • #5
          Does he mention he had Danny Whitten murdereded?!

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          • #6






            Quote Originally Posted by TIP
            View Post

            Does he mention he had Danny Whitten murdereded?!




            Yes. Though, typically, it is light on actual details. Just an "I may have had a hand in his death, and I lib with that all the time."



            I like Pondo, but Danny was a better guitarist in my opinion. He also was such a great singer, doing so much fill work. And he wrote some stellar stuff. He may well have become a star on his own - hey, look how being with Neil helped Nils' career!

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            • #7






              Quote Originally Posted by Trashika
              View Post

              Yes. Though, typically, it is light on actual details. Just an "I may have had a hand in his death, and I lib with that all the time."




              or he just plays it off as one of his "epileptic episodes"...epileptics get all the breaks

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              • #8
                lol

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                • #9
                  My son got me that book for Christmas! He also got me Arguably, a collection of Christopher Hitchens' essays, which I've just started.
                  A number of words mean "fool" in various keys. A brinjah is a comical person; to brinja is to play the fool. Fool can be an adjective meaning foolish: "Cho, man! You too fool!" - or as the abstract noun, foolishness: "De whol a de nex week Wasp wid him fool fly up an dung."—Frederic G. Cassidy

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                  • #10
                    Were there any Dylan anecdotes?
                    This is not the so-called Warbleshinny mastadon. over

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                    • #11






                      Quote Originally Posted by Rhone
                      View Post

                      Were there any Dylan anecdotes?




                      He tells the story of how he and Bob wound up drunk together one night shooting at seagulls in a Wal-Mart parking lot. It wasn't a semi-auto so it's OK....it was that night Neil got the idea for "Like A Hurricane"...it's such a different song when you think of it from the perspective of a seagull getting "blown away" from two drunk hippies with a shotgun and some ripple.

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                      • #12






                        Quote Originally Posted by Rhone
                        View Post

                        Were there any Dylan anecdotes?




                        Anecdotes? Not really. But he discusses "Bob" numerous times.

                        Two interesting points I took away on that topic, 1) Neil didnt listen to Bob's records for a long time because he knew he would be influenced by them and was terrified of becoming a Dylan clone (of which there were many) and 2) he wondered why Bob never, ever has returned to his pre-electric approach of the troubadour with just a guitar and a harp. Dylan did that for like 6 years or so, yet never went back. Neil said he was gonna ask him about it at some point. (tick tock) He muses that maybe Dylan likes the comfort and camaraderie of a band, which Neil understood. Still, he never has gone near his early approach.



                        If you have heard Bob's voice in the past 20 years, it is clear it would be kind of scary to small kids these days

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                        • #13
                          TIP is ON FIRE!!!!!!!



                          Board Score: 98

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