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All the meditation techniques we know today come from buddhism

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  • All the meditation techniques we know today come from buddhism

    OK, that's not 100% correct but almost. There are other traditions that have developed their own methods, or similar methods, without eveer having any dealings with buddhism. There are still other techniques around but...

    Before the Buddha meditation in India was about starving yourself, it was about punishing your body, sitting or standing in painful positions to force yourself into trance. This works but the Buddha thought it wasn't the right way, that it was too extreme and that it didn't really lead to the goal he sought.

    He knew pretty well, he had practiced all these hard methods for six years. He had reached the different states of trance that they were said to lead to. He had also realized that while that was cool it had also made his ego stronger, he later described his delusions in a pretty funny way, much like you see in cartoons with one good guy and one bad guy sitting on your shoulders whispering advice in your ears.

    He starved so much that it's not unlikely he got a little psychotic. He gave up when he couldn't keep from fainting. He remembered how he had entered a state of bliss as a child. How he had been sitting under a tree in the shade. How he had been comfortable and how his mind had become very clear. He tried this method, to reach a clear state of mind through relaxation. It worked.

    He was the first one in India, and probably the world, to ever formulate how to do this in clear words that anyone can read still today and understand. He left the world with a manual on "how to do meditation" and of al the things he did this may very well be his greatest achievement.

    Nearly every meditation techique taught today comes from this school, the idea being that you reach this goal not through hard struggle but through relaxation of both body and mind. To sit comfortably with your back straight, those are the Buddha's exact words. He was the first one to actually say that. To focus your mind ut not be uptight about it but tolerant if you notice your mind slipping away, just gently bring it back to the meditation object, those are again his words.

    These thoughts existed in yoga and there are traces of them in the Upanishads but it is the Buddha that formulates it clearly, in a step-by-step and "this is how you do it" kind of way. He not only advices people "to enter samadhi", which is what the older texts tend to do, but he gives details on how to do it and what kind of problems might occur and how to overcome them.

    He taught many techniques if we consider different meditation objects as different techniques but he always used the same foundation. Good moral conduct and a relaxed attitude.

    This was what he first meant with "The Middle Path". He was talking about a not so severe practice, a way of meditation that was not about pain but showed a path away from pain instead wen he held his very first speach talking to the five ascetics that he had starved together with for six years.
    Terje Larsson

    inbox is full, send e-mail instead

    Hey, wanna look at my comics? Come here then http://terjelarssonserier.blogspot.com/

    Ah, sorry, it's all in swedish, but you can always look!

    You can also check out my crazy friend Dan's crazy website where he'll teach you to master the guitar in 8 minutes (or days... or whatever).

    http://spytunes.co.uk/

  • #2
    why do we need to meditate like others?


    I meditate, and I don't know **************** about budda

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Ray20
      why do we need to meditate like others?


      I meditate, and I don't know **************** about budda


      Well, you're probably doing a lot of the things he taught. Unless you're a whirling dervish I highly doubt that the meditation technique you use is so unique that it's got no connection with the Buddha's teachings on the subject.

      So it's not that we need to do like everyone else or that it matters if you know **************** about the Buddha or not. If the meditation you do is good for you then that's fine, I don't care. I'm just pointing out the man's greatest achievement.

      He left detailed instructions on how to actually do it before anyone else had even begun to formulate it. Read the Bhagavadgita for instance, which is older than buddhism by several centuries. It talks about meditation but in such vague words that you can't use any of it.

      The Buddha speaks so clearly that you can read what he said and start on your own without a teacher even. Several texts that go like "start like this, try this object, fi that doesn't work try this one instead, if you have problems focusing try this trick" and so on.
      Terje Larsson

      inbox is full, send e-mail instead

      Hey, wanna look at my comics? Come here then http://terjelarssonserier.blogspot.com/

      Ah, sorry, it's all in swedish, but you can always look!

      You can also check out my crazy friend Dan's crazy website where he'll teach you to master the guitar in 8 minutes (or days... or whatever).

      http://spytunes.co.uk/

      Comment


      • #4
        So basically sit down and don't do anything?

        I do that every day at work.
        SECTION 54: Where our planet finds hope, where wings take dream.

        The shibboleth of MacGyver laid bare, flat on a table, blackened by bruises he couldn’t explain. And there was nothing he could build to save himself out of biros and blue-tac.

        They opened up his cavities in the operating theatre, but the doctors couldn’t find a heart, his lymph glands running motor oil, his calloused fingers lie inert, their intricate ability punctured by the god-shaped hole in adolescent consciousness.

        He couldn’t build a bomb to mend the splinters of his broken heart.

        His home-made radar couldn’t find a way to make his weapons art.


        Last edited by God on 12-22-2004 at 044 AM

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        • #5
          It's a damn shame that the teachings of buddhism are designed to bring about the death of creativity, or else I'd be a card-carrying buddhist right now.

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          • #6
            i see meditation, as taught by buddha, as a practical method for attaining genuine peace of mind.

            it's something that western society could really do with catching onto just now.

            it's unlikely to do so however as long as the 'method' is bound up with the idea that it's part of an asian religion and therefore alien to our own culture.

            its development may also be hampered by the idea that it is just the same as prayer and therefore of no relevance to anyone who isn't 'religious'.

            what is needed is a western, secular notion of meditation to catch the popular imagination in a big way.

            this would really change the world.
            More tea, vicar?

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            • #7
              It cums from botchulism. Gotta go, I hear the Ice Cream truck............

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              • #8
                Originally posted by hogberto
                its development may also be hampered by the idea that it is just the same as prayer and therefore of no relevance to anyone who isn't 'religious'.

                what is needed is a western, secular notion of meditation to catch the popular imagination in a big way.

                this would really change the world.


                I think you have a point but I must also add that I'm a little tired of seeing buddhist meditation used in the west today totally without any kind of religious, or moral if you will, context. It's sad that this is overlooked because it does lay a foundation for the meditation practice.
                Terje Larsson

                inbox is full, send e-mail instead

                Hey, wanna look at my comics? Come here then http://terjelarssonserier.blogspot.com/

                Ah, sorry, it's all in swedish, but you can always look!

                You can also check out my crazy friend Dan's crazy website where he'll teach you to master the guitar in 8 minutes (or days... or whatever).

                http://spytunes.co.uk/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Stealthy
                  So basically sit down and don't do anything?

                  I do that every day at work.


                  I wish it were that simple.

                  ...but 'doing nothing' often amounts to letting your mind run. Meditation is about the halting of that running. Your brainwaves can mesurably change during this process to what more closely resembles sleep.

                  I always come out of it with a very interesting sense of calm with everything....nothing feels wrong and my normal judgement patterns of everything being good or bad aren't 'on'. I can't say it any better than the cliche "everything just is". Which can be very liberating from your typical chaotic mind running on labelling, stereotyping, judging everything it perceives.

                  I think it's a healthy state to visit, even if only temporarily....
                  (Everybody knows this is nowhere)

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                  • #10
                    What about transcendental masturbation?
                    Poo Haiku

                    Sometimes when I fart
                    I am fooled by my bowels
                    Oops, I did a poo

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                    • #11
                      In the west, we call this...a nap.

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                      • #12
                        terje is so in love with the east, if he ever went there without his wife they'd rob, drug and turn him into a eunich

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Terje


                          I think you have a point but I must also add that I'm a little tired of seeing buddhist meditation used in the west today totally without any kind of religious, or moral if you will, context. It's sad that this is overlooked because it does lay a foundation for the meditation practice.


                          a religious context it can do without. it's not about the social movement around a spiritual dogma that a religion represents. meditation can be practised by an individual without any prior dogma. meditation comes before religion and it can replace religion.

                          as to a moral context, meditation does not need this as a prior condition. what the individual discovers upon meditating, and losing the 'separation' from the surrounding universe, is that a deep swell of peace and wisdom rises up inside. morals come up at this time.

                          the mistake would be to regard an intellectual set of morals as a necessary pre-condition to effective meditation. perhaps we are too easily tied in knots over what is 'moral' and what is 'immoral' because we treat morals as a matter of the intellect rather than of something that arises before thought.

                          if it seems that meditation is being used without any 'religious or moral context' then it may be that this is a result of individuals not genuinely meditating: seeking the benefits of talking about meditation or appearing to do it but not actually deeply engaging in it.
                          More tea, vicar?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by hogberto

                            it's something that western society could really do with catching onto just now.

                            it's unlikely to do so however as long as the 'method' is bound up with the idea that it's part of an asian religion and therefore alien to our own culture.


                            How funny. Christianity is also an Asian religion.
                            Originally Posted by Calum


                            Is she cuddling a dirty swan?









                            Originally Posted by vikingrat


                            The world doesn't need a new generation of hippies.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by hogberto
                              i see meditation, as taught by buddha, as a practical method for attaining genuine peace of mind.

                              it's something that western society could really do with catching onto just now.

                              it's unlikely to do so however as long as the 'method' is bound up with the idea that it's part of an asian religion and therefore alien to our own culture.

                              its development may also be hampered by the idea that it is just the same as prayer and therefore of no relevance to anyone who isn't 'religious'.

                              what is needed is a western, secular notion of meditation to catch the popular imagination in a big way.

                              this would really change the world.



                              Start Here
                              Originally Posted by Buck62


                              Obama is a "reactionary" president. He reacts without looking at the long term effects of his policies, many of which will eventually bankrupt the USA. His constant apologies to these little pissant Marxist leaders will come back to haunt him. Republicans won't have to defeat Obama, he's screwing himself. In other words, if your political foe is commiting political suicide, you don't say anything. You keep your mouth shut and let it happen.

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