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  • OT: Q: computer recording help

    I've haven't done my own personal recording since the cassette recorder days, but am thinking about making a somewhat feeble attempt at computer recording. Since I'm not sure I'll grasp the changes in technology, I would like to make the first attempt on the cheap & need some advice. To begin with, I'm not overly concerned with high recording quality to begin with, just basically somewhat decent. I'm basically thinking about buying one of the older Cakewalk programs or maybe Sonar 1x just to check out the format & see how much I comprehend.  Since it will be a used program, what do I need to look for to make sure I can use it (ie...registration requirements, serial numbers, etc that might make them unusable)?

    Finally, what would you recommend as a starter?

    ''All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing"--Edmund Burke
    Man created science to create what man wants science to create.

  • #2

    stratosaurus wrote:

    I've haven't done my own personal recording since the cassette recorder days, but am thinking about making a somewhat feeble attempt at computer recording. Since I'm not sure I'll grasp the changes in technology, I would like to make the first attempt on the cheap & need some advice. To begin with, I'm not overly concerned with high recording quality to begin with, just basically somewhat decent. I'm basically thinking about buying one of the older Cakewalk programs or maybe Sonar 1x just to check out the format & see how much I comprehend.  Since it will be a used program, what do I need to look for to make sure I can use it (ie...registration requirements, serial numbers, etc that might make them unusable)?

    Finally, what would you recommend as a starter?


    good question, Im kinda in the same boat.

     

    I have a friend who wants to sell me his pro-tools setup, but if there is a steep learning curve on pro tools, I dont want to be bogged down with tech issues.

    Comment


    • stratosaurus
      stratosaurus commented
      Editing a comment

      Just Me wrote:

      stratosaurus wrote:

      I've haven't done my own personal recording since the cassette recorder days, but am thinking about making a somewhat feeble attempt at computer recording. Since I'm not sure I'll grasp the changes in technology, I would like to make the first attempt on the cheap & need some advice. To begin with, I'm not overly concerned with high recording quality to begin with, just basically somewhat decent. I'm basically thinking about buying one of the older Cakewalk programs or maybe Sonar 1x just to check out the format & see how much I comprehend.  Since it will be a used program, what do I need to look for to make sure I can use it (ie...registration requirements, serial numbers, etc that might make them unusable)?

      Finally, what would you recommend as a starter?


      good question, Im kinda in the same boat.

       

      I have a friend who wants to sell me his pro-tools setup, but if there is a steep learning curve on pro tools, I dont want to be bogged down with tech issues.


       Yep, the learning curve is kinda what I'm worried about & would like to keep it simple & to the minimum.

      Feel free to hijack the thread with any question you have.


    • moogerfooger
      moogerfooger commented
      Editing a comment

      Just Me wrote:

      stratosaurus wrote:

      I've haven't done my own personal recording since the cassette recorder days, but am thinking about making a somewhat feeble attempt at computer recording. Since I'm not sure I'll grasp the changes in technology, I would like to make the first attempt on the cheap & need some advice. To begin with, I'm not overly concerned with high recording quality to begin with, just basically somewhat decent. I'm basically thinking about buying one of the older Cakewalk programs or maybe Sonar 1x just to check out the format & see how much I comprehend.  Since it will be a used program, what do I need to look for to make sure I can use it (ie...registration requirements, serial numbers, etc that might make them unusable)?

      Finally, what would you recommend as a starter?


      good question, Im kinda in the same boat.

       

      I have a friend who wants to sell me his pro-tools setup, but if there is a steep learning curve on pro tools, I dont want to be bogged down with tech issues.


      protools is the easiest platfrom out there -- it's usable with no prior knowledge. you set the mixer up just like you would hardware .  each channel has an input and output with can be a hardware output or a buss. you have. aux inputs that opperate the same way.  it has a dep feature set but a low learning curve -- go for it. 


    • Philter
      Philter commented
      Editing a comment

      Just Me wrote:

      stratosaurus wrote:

      I've haven't done my own personal recording since the cassette recorder days, but am thinking about making a somewhat feeble attempt at computer recording. Since I'm not sure I'll grasp the changes in technology, I would like to make the first attempt on the cheap & need some advice. To begin with, I'm not overly concerned with high recording quality to begin with, just basically somewhat decent. I'm basically thinking about buying one of the older Cakewalk programs or maybe Sonar 1x just to check out the format & see how much I comprehend.  Since it will be a used program, what do I need to look for to make sure I can use it (ie...registration requirements, serial numbers, etc that might make them unusable)?

      Finally, what would you recommend as a starter?


      good question, Im kinda in the same boat.

       

      I have a friend who wants to sell me his pro-tools setup, but if there is a steep learning curve on pro tools, I dont want to be bogged down with tech issues.


      ProTools is relatively easy.  Very intuitive and straight forward.  Make sure your friend agrees to help you with the initial installation and setup.

       

      I would recommend ProTools to the OP too.

  • #3
    What are you wanting to do? This makes quite a difference in my response.

    Acoustic/vocal ? MIDI sequencing ? Live band ? Do you need mics? Do you have a drum machine ? The more you divulge the better the advice.

    Comment


    • stratosaurus
      stratosaurus commented
      Editing a comment

      Hoppy Shimko wrote:
      What are you wanting to do? This makes quite a difference in my response.

      Acoustic/vocal ? MIDI sequencing ? Live band ? Do you need mics? Do you have a drum machine ? The more you divulge the better the advice.



      Acoustic/vocal ?  Yes

      MIDI sequencing ? No

      Live band ?  Not now, maybe later. Any band recording will be one member, vocal, instrument at a time

      Do you need mics?  Have plenty of mics, though not condensors.

      Do you have a drum machine ? Yes (Alesis SR-16)

      It will be just me to start with & all I'm out to do is see if I can learn how to use the program & figure out all the functions/parameters, how to access them & use them. All  I've done is watch the guy in the studio & what he does looks like a foreign language to me. No experience at this at all.. That's why, I'm not worried so much about quality of the recording. I am basically going to begin with no experience & no idea what I'm getting into & see how it goes & if I enjoy it enough & if I maintain enough interest to continue to learn all the complexities. Right now, it isn't about recording as much as it is just seeing if I have the interest to invest the time to learn the programs.


  • #4

    I'd start with Audacity and Hydrogen. 

     

    Audacity: http://audacity.sourceforge.net/

     

    Hydrogen: http://www.hydrogen-music.org/hcms/

     

    Using these programs you can record and make music immediately. Get your feet wet for only the time it takes to download and install. 

     Edit: I forgot lmms: http://lmms.sourceforge.net/

     

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    We've all heard that a million monkeys banging on a million typewriters will eventually reproduce the entire works of Shakespeare. Now, thanks to the Internet, we know this is not true.

    Comment


    • gspointer
      gspointer commented
      Editing a comment
      I assume you are on a PC?

  • #5

    stratosaurus wrote:

    I've haven't done my own personal recording since the cassette recorder days, but am thinking about making a somewhat feeble attempt at computer recording. Since I'm not sure I'll grasp the changes in technology, I would like to make the first attempt on the cheap & need some advice. To begin with, I'm not overly concerned with high recording quality to begin with, just basically somewhat decent. I'm basically thinking about buying one of the older Cakewalk programs or maybe Sonar 1x just to check out the format & see how much I comprehend.  Since it will be a used program, what do I need to look for to make sure I can use it (ie...registration requirements, serial numbers, etc that might make them unusable)?

    Finally, what would you recommend as a starter?


    You want to get your feet wet in recording, but you do not want to spend a lot of money.  Sounds slightly contradictory.

    May I suggest the open source program Audacity.  It come in Windows, Mac, and Linux flavors.  While the open source programs are free, there is, like any powerful program, an investment in time to learn to use it.  It is a fairly powerful, but easy to use DAW.

    You will also need a decent microphone.


    >>> LINK TO AUDACITY PAGE ON SOURCEFORGE <<<<

    Audacity1

    auacity2

    Attached Files

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