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  • My take on this gun thing

    IMO, both sides of this issue have it wrong.

     

    There is a brand of wrong coming from pro-gun side...  which has become the pro-gun violence stance.  Americans are armed like an army, yet the violence continues and massacres are on the rise.  How could come to the conclusion that all we need is more guns...  this is pure bull**************** from the NRA (the arms manufacturing shills).  It is in the best interest to whip up a frenzy of fear and the send out a few (very few) stories about how someone with a gun saved someone.  Let me help you out, if this story reaches the thousands, then it will have relevance.

     

    The Anti-gun crowd has it wrong to think that getting rid of guns will stop a massacre.  By banning/limiting gun ownership will only create a "black market" gun economy...  this will work out as well as making drugs illegal.

     

    The solution (IMHO) lies in community.  Historically, the reason people banned together was for safety, first and formost.  Honestly, how many folks know the 8 folks who surround you... not just the persons name, but actually know them.  Then guess how many of them can say the same.  The trend of becoming less aware of community leaves one feeling isolated, this drives fear and a perception of a need for protection (read: a gun). The lack of ability to rely on your neighbors leave you feeling vulneralbe and this makes you feel that you can be taken advantage of.  You know that is is in the best interest of the gun manufactures to foster this falsehood.  Fear = sales.  It has been a national trend for americans to be less and less involved.  This creates a breeding ground for a socially marinalized person to feel that the people around them are less and less human.  The community will feel obligated to help to protect itself...  not with guns, but with eyes and a willingness to be involved.  It has always been a truism that the best way to prevent crime is to see the criminals.  If you have the american "**************** my neighbor, it doesn't affect me" attitude, then expect nothing to improve.  It is the core of all human life to band together and offer protection and support.  In modern america, we are trending away from this.  the reality is that there is no action taken by any public offical at any level that will have a .000000001% affect that becoming a community will have...  now the cool part, it's free, it creates no new laws, and puts the responsablity on the people most affected by gun violence.

    I'm not a gynecologist, but I'll be glad to take a look

    Float like a butterfly, sting like VD

    What happens up north, stays up north

  • #2
    Should I have posted something way more whacky?
    I'm not a gynecologist, but I'll be glad to take a look

    Float like a butterfly, sting like VD

    What happens up north, stays up north

    Comment


    • Marko
      Marko commented
      Editing a comment

      55gibby wrote:
      Should I have posted something way more whacky?

       

      Yes


  • #3
    I stopped reading it after the third line.

    Thanks for the effort though.

    Comment


    • 55gibby
      55gibby commented
      Editing a comment
      Good for you... I hope you enjoy ignorance

    • Hoppy Shimko
      Hoppy Shimko commented
      Editing a comment

      mauser wrote:
      I stopped reading it after the third line.

      Thanks for the effort though.

      lol Hey buddy, did you get that bouquet of petunias your mammy ate at sunday school? lol


  • #4
    Around here you pretty much have to.

    Comment


    • 55gibby
      55gibby commented
      Editing a comment

      BTW, I have owned guns since I was 11 years old and was, at one time, a member of the NRA.  I quit the NRA when they became the gun violence lobby.  I am a life long hunter and have always enjoyed the shooting sports


  • #5

    55gibby wrote:

    IMO, both sides of this issue have it wrong.

     

    There is a brand of wrong coming from pro-gun side...  Which has become the pro-gun violence stance.  Americans are armed like an army, yet the violence continues and massacres are on the rise.  How could come to the conclusion that all we need is more guns...  This is pure bull**************** from the NRA (the arms manufacturing shills).  It is in the best interest to whip up a frenzy of fear and the send out a few (very few) stories about how someone with a gun saved someone.  Let me help you out, if this story reaches the thousands, then it will have relevance.

     

    The Anti-gun crowd has it wrong to think that getting rid of guns will stop a massacre.  By banning/limiting gun ownership will only create a "black market" gun economy...  This will work out as well as making drugs illegal.

     

    The solution (IMHO) lies in community.  Historically, the reason people banned together was for safety, first and formost.  Honestly, how many folks know the 8 folks who surround you... not just the persons name, but actually know them.  Then guess how many of them can say the same.  The trend of becoming less aware of community leaves one feeling isolated, this drives fear and a perception of a need for protection (read: a gun). The lack of ability to rely on your neighbors leave you feeling vulneralbe and this makes you feel that you can be taken advantage of.  You know that is is in the best interest of the gun manufactures to foster this falsehood.  Fear = sales.  It has been a national trend for americans to be less and less involved.  This creates a breeding ground for a socially marinalized person to feel that the people around them are less and less human.  The community will feel obligated to help to protect itself...  not with guns, but with eyes and a willingness to be involved.  It has always been a truism that the best way to prevent crime is to see the criminals.  If you have the american "**************** my neighbor, it doesn't affect me" attitude, then expect nothing to improve.  It is the core of all human life to band together and offer protection and support.  In modern america, we are trending away from this.  the reality is that there is no action taken by any public offical at any level that will have a .000000001% affect that becoming a community will have...  now the cool part, it's free, it creates no new laws, and puts the responsablity on the people most affected by gun violence.


    I don't disagree at all. Mostly because it mentions the root cause of gun violence....a dehumanization of our neighbors and the cheapening of life.

    Thank you for approaching this from a root cause perspective vs. addressing symptoms that pander to politics and/or emotion.

    When kids kill each other over Air Jordans or because they're throwing a tantrum towards their mom, there's a larger problem and threat to society than inanimate objects. It's the disregard for human life that's the problem.

    Comment


    • #6

      55gibby wrote:

      IMO, both sides of this issue have it wrong.

       

      There is a brand of wrong coming from pro-gun side...  which has become the pro-gun violence stance.  Americans are armed like an army, yet the violence continues and massacres are on the rise.  How could come to the conclusion that all we need is more guns...  this is pure bull**************** from the NRA (the arms manufacturing shills).  It is in the best interest to whip up a frenzy of fear and the send out a few (very few) stories about how someone with a gun saved someone.  Let me help you out, if this story reaches the thousands, then it will have relevance.

       

      The Anti-gun crowd has it wrong to think that getting rid of guns will stop a massacre.  By banning/limiting gun ownership will only create a "black market" gun economy...  this will work out as well as making drugs illegal.

       

      The solution (IMHO) lies in community.  Historically, the reason people banned together was for safety, first and formost.  Honestly, how many folks know the 8 folks who surround you... not just the persons name, but actually know them.  Then guess how many of them can say the same.  The trend of becoming less aware of community leaves one feeling isolated, this drives fear and a perception of a need for protection (read: a gun). The lack of ability to rely on your neighbors leave you feeling vulneralbe and this makes you feel that you can be taken advantage of.  You know that is is in the best interest of the gun manufactures to foster this falsehood.  Fear = sales.  It has been a national trend for americans to be less and less involved.  This creates a breeding ground for a socially marinalized person to feel that the people around them are less and less human.  The community will feel obligated to help to protect itself...  not with guns, but with eyes and a willingness to be involved.  It has always been a truism that the best way to prevent crime is to see the criminals.  If you have the american "**************** my neighbor, it doesn't affect me" attitude, then expect nothing to improve.  It is the core of all human life to band together and offer protection and support.  In modern america, we are trending away from this.  the reality is that there is no action taken by any public offical at any level that will have a .000000001% affect that becoming a community will have...  now the cool part, it's free, it creates no new laws, and puts the responsablity on the people most affected by gun violence.


      this is double plus good

      Comment


      • #7

        55gibby wrote:

        IMO, both sides of this issue have it wrong.

         

        There is a brand of wrong coming from pro-gun side...  which has become the pro-gun violence stance.  Americans are armed like an army, yet the violence continues and massacres are on the rise.  How could come to the conclusion that all we need is more guns...  this is pure bull**************** from the NRA (the arms manufacturing shills).  It is in the best interest to whip up a frenzy of fear and the send out a few (very few) stories about how someone with a gun saved someone.  Let me help you out, if this story reaches the thousands, then it will have relevance.

         

        NRA never said that or even implied it. Thread = FAIL

        Why do chicken coops have two doors?
        Because if they had four doors they would be chicken sedans.

        Comment


        • Mr.NiceGuy
          Mr.NiceGuy commented
          Editing a comment

          "t has always been a truism that the best way to prevent crime is to see the criminals."

           

          And as long as they're within range, if I can see them, I can hit them. yeah - I see how that works.

           

          No, your premise that the NRA is pro-violence is a complete piece of leftist propoganda and simply deflates your attempt to be serious.


      • #8

        55gibby wrote:

        IMO, both sides of this issue have it wrong.

         

        There is a brand of wrong coming from pro-gun side...  which has become the pro-gun violence stance.  Americans are armed like an army, yet the violence continues and massacres are on the rise.  How could come to the conclusion that all we need is more guns...  this is pure bull**************** from the NRA (the arms manufacturing shills).  It is in the best interest to whip up a frenzy of fear and the send out a few (very few) stories about how someone with a gun saved someone.  Let me help you out, if this story reaches the thousands, then it will have relevance.

         

        The Anti-gun crowd has it wrong to think that getting rid of guns will stop a massacre.  By banning/limiting gun ownership will only create a "black market" gun economy...  this will work out as well as making drugs illegal.

         

        The solution (IMHO) lies in community.  Historically, the reason people banned together was for safety, first and formost.  Honestly, how many folks know the 8 folks who surround you... not just the persons name, but actually know them.  Then guess how many of them can say the same.  The trend of becoming less aware of community leaves one feeling isolated, this drives fear and a perception of a need for protection (read: a gun). The lack of ability to rely on your neighbors leave you feeling vulneralbe and this makes you feel that you can be taken advantage of.  You know that is is in the best interest of the gun manufactures to foster this falsehood.  Fear = sales.  It has been a national trend for americans to be less and less involved.  This creates a breeding ground for a socially marinalized person to feel that the people around them are less and less human.  The community will feel obligated to help to protect itself...  not with guns, but with eyes and a willingness to be involved.  It has always been a truism that the best way to prevent crime is to see the criminals.  If you have the american "**************** my neighbor, it doesn't affect me" attitude, then expect nothing to improve.  It is the core of all human life to band together and offer protection and support.  In modern america, we are trending away from this.  the reality is that there is no action taken by any public offical at any level that will have a .000000001% affect that becoming a community will have...  now the cool part, it's free, it creates no new laws, and puts the responsablity on the people most affected by gun violence.


        My take on the gun thing is that if you even suggest that maybe it wouldn't be a bad idea to require some real training and keep better track of the firearms being sold or that the 2nd amendment isn't a blanket prohibition on ALL gun control measures, you'll immediately be labeled a liberal "gun grabber" or something similar.  And if you believe that the 2nd amendment protects an individual right to bear arms and believe that the fact that violent crime rates have been declining for a couple of decades suggests that maybe "too many guns" is not the core of the problem, you'll be labeled a tea-bagging "gun nut" or something similar.

        Comment


        • thankyou
          thankyou commented
          Editing a comment

          Great thinking, Gibby.

           

          Violent crimes are trending down, but mass killings with semi-auto weapons are going up.  Sure, a lot of it may be copy cat crimes, but what brings people to that kind of horror is perplexing and probably has multiple causes.  You are right about the NRA.  Since LaPierre's rise, they have become a shill for gun manufacturers while sucessfully touting that only they stand between you and the gubmint.  Who is that government that they so despise?  It's you and me and every other citizen.


      • #9

        55gibby wrote:

        IMO, both sides of this issue have it wrong.

         

        There is a brand of wrong coming from pro-gun side...  which has become the pro-gun violence stance.  Americans are armed like an army, yet the violence continues and massacres are on the rise.  How could come to the conclusion that all we need is more guns...  this is pure bull**************** from the NRA (the arms manufacturing shills).  It is in the best interest to whip up a frenzy of fear and the send out a few (very few) stories about how someone with a gun saved someone.  Let me help you out, if this story reaches the thousands, then it will have relevance.

         

        The Anti-gun crowd has it wrong to think that getting rid of guns will stop a massacre.  By banning/limiting gun ownership will only create a "black market" gun economy...  this will work out as well as making drugs illegal.

         

        The solution (IMHO) lies in community.  Historically, the reason people banned together was for safety, first and formost.  Honestly, how many folks know the 8 folks who surround you... not just the persons name, but actually know them.  Then guess how many of them can say the same.  The trend of becoming less aware of community leaves one feeling isolated, this drives fear and a perception of a need for protection (read: a gun). The lack of ability to rely on your neighbors leave you feeling vulneralbe and this makes you feel that you can be taken advantage of.  You know that is is in the best interest of the gun manufactures to foster this falsehood.  Fear = sales.  It has been a national trend for americans to be less and less involved.  This creates a breeding ground for a socially marinalized person to feel that the people around them are less and less human.  The community will feel obligated to help to protect itself...  not with guns, but with eyes and a willingness to be involved.  It has always been a truism that the best way to prevent crime is to see the criminals.  If you have the american "**************** my neighbor, it doesn't affect me" attitude, then expect nothing to improve.  It is the core of all human life to band together and offer protection and support.  In modern america, we are trending away from this.  the reality is that there is no action taken by any public offical at any level that will have a .000000001% affect that becoming a community will have...  now the cool part, it's free, it creates no new laws, and puts the responsablity on the people most affected by gun violence.


        Actually massacres aren't "on the rise" from anything I've seen statistically. No one has advocated "more guns" generally, they've suggested armed guards or allowing armed "good guys" into "gun free zones" and a couple of other things that make sense to law abiding gun carrying citizens. Your bias is showing, you didn't say there were "a few, very few" school massacres in the U.S., but there are, aren't there? Why say that about guns used for good purposes then? There are far more guns used to save people than there are to massacre children in schools, and that's a fact. The "death toll" averaged only two fatalities per year for the last 85 years, which is too much, but still less than many, many other perventable causes. Doing away with open lakes and public swimming pools would save more children.


        And even your second opinion is couched in "anti-gun" terms. Mental health treatment made more available and acceptable to society is what is called for, the Connecticut killer was a poster boy for what's wrong with society; it doesn't pay any attention to troubled youth, and doesn't know how to deal with them effectively.

         

        As always, the guns aren't the problem, it's the mindset of their users.

        Comment



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