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Chinese Graduates Say No Thanks to Factory Jobs

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  • Chinese Graduates Say No Thanks to Factory Jobs

    While people and politicians are pitching for more education and reviving manufacturing in this country, jobs go begging in factories while many college educated young workers, which now number 11 times more than in 1989, are unemployed or underemployed in China. A national survey of urban residents, released this winter by a Chinese university, showed that among people in their early 20s, those with a college degree were four times as likely to be unemployed as those with only an elementary school education. Yet, it is not about the pay. Many factories are desperate for workers, despite offering double-digit annual pay increases and improved benefits, while an office job would initially pay as little as a third of factory wages. The glut of college graduates is eroding wages even for those with more marketable majors, like computer science. Vocational schools and training programs are unpopular because they suffer from a low status [or are seen as] for people from unsuccessful, poor, or peasant backgrounds. 'The more educated people are, the less they want to work in a factory,' said an unemployed graduate. If we do succeed bringing back factory jobs, are there enough people who want them?

    Slashdot

    Many Chinese workers are rejecting factory jobs that require no education and pay three times as much as an office job, yet people on this forum want to argue that education is the only way. 

    (There are two links and one is highlighted.)


  • #2

    normh wrote:

    While people and politicians are pitching for more education and reviving manufacturing in this country, jobs go begging in factories while many college educated young workers, which now number 11 times more than in 1989, are unemployed or underemployed in China. A national survey of urban residents, released this winter by a Chinese university, showed that among people in their early 20s, those with a college degree were four times as likely to be unemployed as those with only an elementary school education. Yet, it is not about the pay. Many factories are desperate for workers, despite offering double-digit annual pay increases and improved benefits, while an office job would initially pay as little as a third of factory wages. The glut of college graduates is eroding wages even for those with more marketable majors, like computer science. Vocational schools and training programs are unpopular because they suffer from a low status [or are seen as] for people from unsuccessful, poor, or peasant backgrounds. 'The more educated people are, the less they want to work in a factory,' said an unemployed graduate. If we do succeed bringing back factory jobs, are there enough people who want them?

    Slashdot

    Many Chinese workers are rejecting factory jobs that require no education and pay three times as much as an office job, yet people on this forum want to argue that education is the only way. 

    (There are two links and one is highlighted.)


     

    Who is arguing that education is the only way? You have names?

    Comment


    • normh
      normh commented
      Editing a comment

      splatbass wrote:

      Who is arguing that education is the only way? You have names?


      A substantial number of people in this thread.

      It is kind of like the OWS entitlement attitude.  It has a lot of bearing on this country too: I trained for XYZ, therefore, it is beneath me to do ZXY.  I am entitled to XYZ.  Yada....


  • #3

    normh wrote:

    While people and politicians are pitching for more education and reviving manufacturing in this country, jobs go begging in factories while many college educated young workers, which now number 11 times more than in 1989, are unemployed or underemployed in China. A national survey of urban residents, released this winter by a Chinese university, showed that among people in their early 20s, those with a college degree were four times as likely to be unemployed as those with only an elementary school education. Yet, it is not about the pay. Many factories are desperate for workers, despite offering double-digit annual pay increases and improved benefits, while an office job would initially pay as little as a third of factory wages. The glut of college graduates is eroding wages even for those with more marketable majors, like computer science. Vocational schools and training programs are unpopular because they suffer from a low status [or are seen as] for people from unsuccessful, poor, or peasant backgrounds. 'The more educated people are, the less they want to work in a factory,' said an unemployed graduate. If we do succeed bringing back factory jobs, are there enough people who want them?

    Slashdot

    Many Chinese workers are rejecting factory jobs that require no education and pay three times as much as an office job, yet people on this forum want to argue that education is the only way. 

    (There are two links and one is highlighted.)


    It appears China and the US are not so different after all....HA HA !

     

     

    Comment


    • Elvie
      Elvie commented
      Editing a comment

      Hoppy Shimko wrote:

      normh wrote:

      While people and politicians are pitching for more education and reviving manufacturing in this country, jobs go begging in factories while many college educated young workers, which now number 11 times more than in 1989, are unemployed or underemployed in China. A national survey of urban residents, released this winter by a Chinese university, showed that among people in their early 20s, those with a college degree were four times as likely to be unemployed as those with only an elementary school education. Yet, it is not about the pay. Many factories are desperate for workers, despite offering double-digit annual pay increases and improved benefits, while an office job would initially pay as little as a third of factory wages. The glut of college graduates is eroding wages even for those with more marketable majors, like computer science. Vocational schools and training programs are unpopular because they suffer from a low status [or are seen as] for people from unsuccessful, poor, or peasant backgrounds. 'The more educated people are, the less they want to work in a factory,' said an unemployed graduate. If we do succeed bringing back factory jobs, are there enough people who want them?

      Slashdot

      Many Chinese workers are rejecting factory jobs that require no education and pay three times as much as an office job, yet people on this forum want to argue that education is the only way. 

      (There are two links and one is highlighted.)


      It appears China and the US are not so different after all....HA HA !

       

       


      Neither needs a middle class!


    • Bowe
      Bowe commented
      Editing a comment
      why do so many people want to turn the US into China?

  • #4

    China's downfall will be their total disregard to the environment. Their rivers are toxic.

    Comment


    • Zooey
      Zooey commented
      Editing a comment

      RedRoadEnsemble wrote:

      China's downfall will be their total disregard to the environment. Their rivers are toxic.


      They're actually pulling it together.  Since China is the world's manufacturer, most goods manufactured there comply with strict European standards like WEEE and RoHS.  China also has a national law to regulate hazardous chemicals that is very similiar to RoHS. 



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