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  • NYC hit with huge wave of homelessness

     

    Any questions as to the value of subsidy housing?

    NYC hit with huge wave of homelessness

     

    New York City is experiencing its largest wave of homelessness since the Great Depression.

    The spike started following cuts to a government rent subsidy program. Ironically, the impact of having to provide shelter to more than 20,000 homeless children each night is costing the city more money than the cost of the subsidies.

    [3:37]


  • #2

    I guess they should have cut something else.

    Comment


    • tequila_titan
      tequila_titan commented
      Editing a comment

      Send 'em your money!


  • #3

    moonlightin wrote:

     

    Any questions as to the value of subsidy housing?

    NYC hit with huge wave of homelessness

     

    New York City is experiencing its largest wave of homelessness since the Great Depression.

    The spike started following cuts to a government rent subsidy program. Ironically, the impact of having to provide shelter to more than 20,000 homeless children each night is costing the city more money than the cost of the subsidies.



    That would all depend.  I routinely advocate in behalf of the homeless.  I get my rear end handed to me all the time in that advocacy.

    One of my most critical advasaries is Palmer Court in SLC.  Palmer Court is a conversion to a long term housing solution for the chronically homeless and was a city/private venture.  I agree with providing and transitioning the homeless into a more stable environment, however Palmer Courts solution is to place a person under a camera as much as possible and to electronically log their residents movements while hiring security from the homeless and giving them electronic override cards to every room.  The residents are in greater danger from the security and the staff than they are from anything else.  The private venture that owns Palmer Court makes a profit of $30,000 per year per room (converted hotel room and a large ex-hotel).

    I object to this because the profit the private venture makes would be better used to provide services to the homeless and the city would save more money building/buying their own facilities than in renting them from that firm.

    Then you have the other side.  There was a low income housing facility that was privately owned, operated, and recieved no public funds up by the University of Utah.  The University did not like the class of residents of that facility, bought out the facility, turned better than 100 low income residents out into the street, and converted the building into a residence for actors at the university.  The actors residence is paid for on the public dime.  Little did I know at the time that the primary person behind that was George Pyle of the Salt lake Tribune, the Media News Group, and Qwest Communications.  I had my ass handed to me royally advocating for the homeless in that issue.

    So, if the money goes to enrich the wealthy, I stand against increasing funds for homeless housing.  If the money actually goes to helping the homeless and homelessness transitioning, I am all for it.

    Comment


    • moonlightin
      moonlightin commented
      Editing a comment

      normh wrote:

      moonlightin wrote:

       

      Any questions as to the value of subsidy housing?

      NYC hit with huge wave of homelessness

       

      New York City is experiencing its largest wave of homelessness since the Great Depression.

      The spike started following cuts to a government rent subsidy program. Ironically, the impact of having to provide shelter to more than 20,000 homeless children each night is costing the city more money than the cost of the subsidies.



      That would all depend.  I routinely advocate in behalf of the homeless.  I get my rear end handed to me all the time in that advocacy.

      One of my most critical advasaries is Palmer Court in SLC.  Palmer Court is a conversion to a long term housing solution for the chronically homeless and was a city/private venture.  I agree with providing and transitioning the homeless into a more stable environment, however Palmer Courts solution is to place a person under a camera as much as possible and to electronically log their residents movements while hiring security from the homeless and giving them electronic override cards to every room.  The residents are in greater danger from the security and the staff than they are from anything else.  The private venture that owns Palmer Court makes a profit of $30,000 per year per room (converted hotel room and a large ex-hotel).

      I object to this because the profit the private venture makes would be better used to provide services to the homeless and the city would save more money building/buying their own facilities than in renting them from that firm.

      Then you have the other side.  There was a low income housing facility that was privately owned, operated, and recieved no public funds up by the University of Utah.  The University did not like the class of residents of that facility, bought out the facility, turned better than 100 low income residents out into the street, and converted the building into a residence for actors at the university.  The actors residence is paid for on the public dime.  Little did I know at the time that the primary person behind that was George Pyle of the Salt lake Tribune, the Media News Group, and Qwest Communications.  I had my ass handed to me royally advocating for the homeless in that issue.

      So, if the money goes to enrich the wealthy, I stand against increasing funds for homeless housing.  If the money actually goes to helping the homeless and homelessness transitioning, I am all for it.


      Thank you. You provide an excellent example of why privatization in some areas should not happen.


  • #4

    Sandy's rejects.

    Comment


    • AxiomVanguard
      AxiomVanguard commented
      Editing a comment

      Thanks O ba ma for the Hope and Change...


  • #5

    moonlightin wrote:

     

    Any questions as to the value of subsidy housing?

    NYC hit with huge wave of homelessness

     

    New York City is experiencing its largest wave of homelessness since the Great Depression.

    The spike started following cuts to a government rent subsidy program. Ironically, the impact of having to provide shelter to more than 20,000 homeless children each night is costing the city more money than the cost of the subsidies.

    [3:37]

    Comment


    • RogueGnome
      RogueGnome commented
      Editing a comment

      mdwagner73 wrote:

      Relocate them to someplace cheaper. 


      A reservation in Oklahoma, perhaps?



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