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Anybody think drone strikes are a good example of U.S. foreign policy?

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  • Anybody think drone strikes are a good example of U.S. foreign policy?

    Peace-prize winner approved drone strikes, read all about it.

     

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/06/world/middleeast/with-brennan-pick-a-light-on-drone-strikes-hazards.html?_r=0

     

    Late last August, a 40-year-old cleric named Salem Ahmed bin Ali Jaber stood up to deliver a speech denouncing Al Qaeda in a village mosque in far eastern Yemen.

     

    It was a brave gesture by a father of seven who commanded great respect in the community, and it did not go unnoticed. Two days later, three members of Al Qaeda came to the mosque in the tiny village of Khashamir after 9 p.m., saying they merely wanted to talk. Mr. Jaber agreed to meet them, bringing his cousin Waleed Abdullah, a police officer, for protection.

    As the five men stood arguing by a cluster of palm trees, a volley of remotely operated American missiles shot down from the night sky and incinerated them all, along with a camel that was tied up nearby.

    The killing of Mr. Jaber, just the kind of leader most crucial to American efforts to eradicate Al Qaeda, was a reminder of the inherent hazards of the quasi-secret campaign of targeted killings that the United States is waging against suspected militants not just in Yemen but also in Pakistanand Somalia.

     

    Anger at America

    In the days afterward, the people of the village vented their fury at the Americans with protests and briefly blocked a road. It is difficult to know what the long-term effects of the deaths will be, though some in the town


  • #2

    "Targeted killings" or "extra-judicial executions" are murder, no matter who does it, where, or to whom. Bush was guilty as Hell, Obama is guilty as Hell, and we're all guilty by association as a society.

    If the U.S. uses political assassination as a tool to control foreign countries and their people, exactly what makes us better than al-Qaeda?

    America will kill you if you worry us by acting suspicious. Be warned.

    It makes me SO proud.

    Not.

    Comment


    • RogueGnome
      RogueGnome commented
      Editing a comment
      It is forbidden to kill; therefore all murderers are punished unless they kill in large numbers and to the sound of trumpets.
        - Voltaire

    • Sloppy Santa
      Sloppy Santa commented
      Editing a comment

      dblazer wrote:

      "Targeted killings" or "extra-judicial executions" are murder, no matter who does it, where, or to whom. Bush was guilty as Hell, Obama is guilty as Hell, and we're all guilty by association as a society.

      If the U.S. uses political assassination as a tool to control foreign countries and their people, exactly what makes us better than al-Qaeda?

      America will kill you if you worry us by acting suspicious. Be warned.

      It makes me SO proud.

      Not.


      You don't think it's sometimes warranted?


    • GTRMAN
      GTRMAN commented
      Editing a comment

      +1


      dblazer wrote:

      "Targeted killings" or "extra-judicial executions" are murder, no matter who does it, where, or to whom. Bush was guilty as Hell, Obama is guilty as Hell, and we're all guilty by association as a society.

      If the U.S. uses political assassination as a tool to control foreign countries and their people, exactly what makes us better than al-Qaeda?

      America will kill you if you worry us by acting suspicious. Be warned.

      It makes me SO proud.

      Not.


       


  • #3

    I don't understand how any American President could be considered for the Nobel Peace Prize.

    Perhaps Jimmy Carter could be an exception - but only for the work he has done after he was POTUS.



    you can't control the wind but you can learn to sail

    contentment is true wealth

    Comment


    • #4

      infragreen wrote:

      Peace-prize winner approved drone strikes, read all about it.

       


      Well, the president is the commander-in-chief.  I don't see anything wrong in principle, except for one tiny detail:  We're not legally at war with anybody.  So my objections relate to our general breakdown in following the law of our government, the constitution.  But if Congress declares war on somebody, fine, let's use whatever weapons get the job done.

       

      Comment


      • RogueGnome
        RogueGnome commented
        Editing a comment

        Used2BMarkoh wrote:

        infragreen wrote:

        Peace-prize winner approved drone strikes, read all about it.

         


        Well, the president is the commander-in-chief.  I don't see anything wrong in principle, except for one tiny detail:  We're not legally at war with anybody.  So my objections relate to our general breakdown in following the law of our government, the constitution.  But if Congress declares war on somebody, fine, let's use whatever weapons get the job done.

         


        Really?

        when was the peace treaty signed?

        Sept. 20, 2001 - Bush Declares War on Terror


    • #5

      infragreen wrote:

      Peace-prize winner approved drone strikes, read all about it.

       

      http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/06/world/middleeast/with-brennan-pick-a-light-on-drone-strikes-hazards.html?_r=0

       

      Late last August, a 40-year-old cleric named Salem Ahmed bin Ali Jaber stood up to deliver a speech denouncing Al Qaeda in a village mosque in far eastern Yemen.

       

      It was a brave gesture by a father of seven who commanded great respect in the community, and it did not go unnoticed. Two days later, three members of Al Qaeda came to the mosque in the tiny village of Khashamir after 9 p.m., saying they merely wanted to talk. Mr. Jaber agreed to meet them, bringing his cousin Waleed Abdullah, a police officer, for protection.

      As the five men stood arguing by a cluster of palm trees, a volley of remotely operated American missiles shot down from the night sky and incinerated them all, along with a camel that was tied up nearby.

      The killing of Mr. Jaber, just the kind of leader most crucial to American efforts to eradicate Al Qaeda, was a reminder of the inherent hazards of the quasi-secret campaign of targeted killings that the United States is waging against suspected militants not just in Yemen but also in Pakistanand Somalia.

       

      Anger at America

      In the days afterward, the people of the village vented their fury at the Americans with protests and briefly blocked a road. It is difficult to know what the long-term effects of the deaths will be, though some in the town

      Comment


      • #6

        The blowback should prove to be quite profitable for the MIC.

        "Anyone who believes exponential growth can go on forever is either a madman or an economist." Kenneth Boulding

        Comment


        • prolurkerguy
          prolurkerguy commented
          Editing a comment

          note4note wrote:

          The blowback should prove to be quite profitable for the MIC.


          not according to splatbass...


      • #7

        What note4note said! 

         

        Huge round of applause. 

        Comment


        • #8

          **************** em'

          kill em all and let god sort them out. lol!

          i think they should be used any time.

          the op was just a "bump in the road"

          how many allies did alkida and the taliban kill?

          does the op think this guy would survive the week? lol!

           

           

           

          Comment



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